Linux.com

Home Linux Community Community Blogs General Linux The GNU/Linux Adventurer's Backpack

The GNU/Linux Adventurer's Backpack

If you are setting off on your new GNU/Linux adventure, there are some must have things that you'll be needing to take along with you.

When you're at the kitchen table packing that backpack for your big adventure, don't forget to stuff these items in there with your lantern, matches, water purification pills, and lip balm. You'll find this stuff will come in very handy along the trail.

A little history --

Linux, which specifically means the kernel portion of the operating system, was born in 1991 when Finnish student Linus Torvalds decided he wanted something to run on his 80386 processor based PC. Linus turned the code for his new kernel lose on USENET.

Within a short while Softlanding Linux System (SLS) was born of a mating of Linus' new kernel and Richard Stallman's GNU Operating System. The SLS project was taken over by Patrick Volkerding, who morphed it into Slackware Linux, the oldest still living GNU/Linux distribution. You can view the Linux family tree to see how things progressed from there.

Some handy documentation --

C'mon. Quit whining. Sometimes, it's a good thing to read the fine manual. The "man" pages, short for manual, are available to you from within any GNU/Linux distribution. They're already in your backpack even if you didn't know it. To access a manual page for a certain command within Linux, just use this from the command line:

$ man <command or application name>

For example, let's say you want to know how to use the ls command. You would type this into the command line:

$ man ls

LS(1)                            User Commands                           LS(1)

NAME
       ls - list directory contents

SYNOPSIS
       ls [OPTION]... [FILE]...

DESCRIPTION
       List  information  about  the FILEs (the current directory by default).
       Sort entries alphabetically if none of -cftuvSUX nor --sort.

       Mandatory arguments to long options are  mandatory  for  short  options
       too.

       -a, --all
              do not ignore entries starting with .<snip>

...and the manual page for the ls command will magically appear. Cool, huh? You can also refer to that same manual page by using online websites that make that same information available to you. You can use Linux Man Pages, Linux Man Pages Online, or other similar sites.

For some more in depth GNU/Linux documentation, you can check out The Linux Documentation Project (TLDP), LinuxDocs.org, or DistroWatch.com. The last provides brief synopses and reviews of most of the GNU/Linux distributions available today.

Which distribution to start the adventure? --

If you clicked on that DistroWatch link above, you'd see that there are many, many GNU/Linux distributions out there in the world. While choice is a good thing, numerous choices can sometimes be overwhelming for new adventurers; what trail should I take? Every GNU/Linux advocate will have their own favorite list of distributions that they recommend to all the new adventurers they run across. Following is my list of the five easiest transition distributions. What's a transition distribution? I define that as a GNU/Linux distribution that is easy to install and use right out of the box for new adventurers who are mostly used to using Microsoft Windows products.

Ubuntu - this is the distro that took GNU/Linux from the desktops of geeks like me and put it on Gramps and Granny's system. It did more to popularize the GNU/Linux operating system than any other distribution prior.

Linux Mint - this distro from the land of Eire is slam packed with all the great stuff you'd want in an operating system. It's good to go right out of the box.

Mepis - while not the most popular GNU/Linux out there, this Debian-based distribution is a fine product, and most suitable for new adventurers.

PCLinuxOS - this distro is a branch of the old and venerable Mandrake/Mandriva GNU/Linux. It's easy to install and to operate.

Ultimate Edition - this distribution gets its foundation from its Debian and Ubuntu roots. It is also easy to install and has loads and loads of useful software included the moment you boot up.

OK, then. We have some history, some documentation, and a choice of distributions in our backpack now. We're almost ready to begin the adventure. But wait! There are a couple more very important items that we'll be needing.

Tips and Tutorials --

Tutorials are documents that teach in a step-by-step fashion. They can cover a lot of information in a small space. They're usually simplified so that amateurs and novices can follow along without the need to know the really complicated stuff underneath it all. Tips are just that; little tid-bits of information to make things go easier on your adventure.

There was once a man called Bruno, he was my friend. He was also a serious GNU/Linux advocate and teacher. He selflessly spent many hours of his daily life teaching others about GNU/Linux. Many of us who knew him learned from him and were inspired by him to carry on his tradition of teaching. While Bruno may no longer be with us, part of the legacy he left us is his Tips for Linux Explorers site. Yes, some of the info there is a bit dated, but most of it is still very relevant and helpful.

As far as tutorials go, there are many sites with wonderful GNU/Linux tutorials. Here are a few that I use regularly: The Linux Tutorial, YoLinux Tutorials, Linux Survival, HowtoForge, Tutorialized, and Linux Planet Tutorials. Believe me, if there's something you want to accomplish within GNU/Linux, there is a tutorial somewhere that will show you how. Remember, when searching for answers to your GNU/Linux questions, Google is your friend.

And lastly, but never last, this most necessary thing to have in your GNU/Linux adventurer's backpack:

Community --

We come into this world alone and we leave it alone, but fortunately, while in this world, we have each other. Were it not for the GNU/Linux - Open Source community, there wouldn't be any GNU/Linux; or if there were, it would be some ghastly thing used by a few uber-geeks in the darkness of night on their own desktop systems. Joyfully, that isn't so because we have community; arguably the most important ingredient in the brewing pot.

There is a large and very active GNU/Linux - Open Source community every where in the world. You can access and interact with that community in many ways; boards and forums, USENET Groups, mailing lists, websites and portals, blogs like this one, etc. Community means a lot to me. Below you'll find my list of favorite places where I go to learn what I need to continue on my own adventure:

Boards and Forums

Scot's Newsletter Forums - Bruno's All Things Linux - a Linux support forum and much more. This site is run by Scot Finnie, Editor-in-chief of ComputerWorld.com.

Jeremy's LinuxQuestions.org - a Linux support forum and community dedicated to assisting adventurers of all skill levels and abilities.

TechSupportGuy Forums - Linux and Unix - another excellent Linux community forum.

The Linux Foundation's Linux.com Community - a relatively new and growing community with many helpful members.

Just Linux Forums - a great community resource.

Linux Forums - search this place for great tips and assistance as you travel along in your adventure.

Also, don't forget... nearly every distribution of GNU/Linux has its own very helpful support community. Check out the main websites for links to their forums and such. All the distros mentioned above have their own forums. Check 'em out.

Linux News Sites

Tux Machines - Susan Linton's wonderful Linux community site.

Linux Today - news you can use.

Linux Insider - more informative Linux news.

LXer Linux News - the world is talking about GNU/Linux and Free/Open Source Software.

The above are just a sampling. There are literally hundreds of top level, informative Linux news sites on the Net. Search!

Linux Learning Blogs

Linux Operating System - Guillermo Garron's very helpful and informative blog.

Linuxaria - Ricardo Capecchi's bi-lingual Everything About Linux blog.

All About Linux - a self-professed "very" popular blog about Linux, Open Source, and Free Software.

Linux Notes from Dark Duck - helpful information on choosing and running Linux on your systems.

Dedoimedo - a place to learn a lot about a lot. A unique experience, I might add.

There are many more sites out there, too. Each distribution usually has a handful of dedicated bloggers and teachers running from their own websites. Don't forget to search online. You'll find some wonderful stuff.

One other thing you can do when starting out on your adventure is to register with The Linux Counter and be counted as part of the community. Proudly display your Linux Registered User number for all to see. Sorry, they're out of stock on the super-dooper decoder rings, though. You may find one in that Cap'n Crunch serial box on your kitchen table. ;)

I've tried to make this as all-inclusive as I could, but of course, I've failed miserably. GNU/Linux is a topic that volumes have been written about. How could I possibly give you all that information in one short article? Oh well. I hope that what you do find here will help you along in your adventure. I leave you with three bits of wisdom that I learned early on when I first started out on my adventure:

  • First and foremost, GNU/Linux is NOT MS Windows. Please don't expect it to be.
  • Secondly, KEEP notes! You will find this an immeasurably important practice to discipline yourself into doing regularly. I don't care if your notes are on your iPad or your main system or on a dead tree note book (my choice medium). Just keep notes. You won't regret it.
  • Lastly, but again NEVER last, the community is there for you. Take from it all that is offered, so that you can learn and expand your horizons on your great GNU/Linux adventure. We ask only one thing from you in return; when the time comes that you have reached a level of knowledge where you can comfortably (and accurately) do so, please give back to the community that supported you. This way there will always be those willing to help the new GNU/Linux Adventurers coming along the trail.

Happy adventuring!

~Eric

P.S. I intend this document to be a living device. I will probably be amending it from time to time.

*This article originally appeared on my Nocturnal Slacker v1.0 blog at Wordpress.com

 

 

 

Comments

Subscribe to Comments Feed

Upcoming Linux Foundation Courses

  1. LFD320 Linux Kernel Internals and Debugging
    15 Sep » 19 Sep - Virtual
    Details
  2. LFS220 Linux System Administration
    22 Sep » 25 Sep - Virtual
    Details
  3. LFS520 OpenStack Cloud Architecture and Deployment
    29 Sep » 02 Oct - Costa Mesa
    Details

View All Upcoming Courses


Who we are ?

The Linux Foundation is a non-profit consortium dedicated to the growth of Linux.

More About the foundation...

Frequent Questions

Join / Linux Training / Board