Linux.com

Community Blogs



Making My own Desktop Manager: The Design

So I've been looking into Clutter this week and figuring out if (i) it's the right technology to use and (ii) how to incorperate it into the original design, so I have nothing flashy to show in this article (although yesterday I did manage to get xlib composite screenshots into Clutter as actors!), so I'd thought I'd share some more of my design with you instead...

So the main design is very simple, similar to the design of a web site (navbar, content, and side-panel)

Read more... Comment (0)
 

The most important modern innovations of Linux is its transformation into a hypervisor

The battleground has shifted from the Operating System to the hypervisor, and Linux has a clear role to play. One of the most important modern innovations of Linux is its transformation into a hypervisor. Learn how KVM and Lguest paly an important role in this trend.

 

 

Unexpected Things Sometimes Work: What Language is Linux Written in?

I have posted an article on Bright Hub two days ago, which was titled "What Language is Linux Written in." I have discussed the various parts of Linux, from the kernel and device drivers to user programs and I just want to hear the community's critics about it. What else do you have in mind? Anything I forgot to put in? Shoot it in the comments.
 

Computex News and The Future of Linux in Netbooks

Every year we are hearing that "2000-something will be the year of Linux." But it does not happen. Asus announced it is better with Windows, Windows XP support is prolonged, Windows 7 is just around the corner (don't say it's crappy with netbooks, AMD announced dual-core Neo processors which will run Aero fine) and the companies will slowly adopt to Linux. Another competitor on the netbook market comes from Android and Acer announced Aspire One with Android in Q3 this year. Let's count the competitors: Android, XP, 7. It was nice news that Ubuntu Moblin was announced but what will be the competition like: AMD Dual Core Neo + Windows vs. the unfamiliar Ubuntu Moblin or Android (by the way, I really loved Moblin and find it really efficient in terms of netbook use).

Put everything in place and rethink: there are many reasons that Linux is not triumphing over Windows. Plus there is competition and in the arena of the netbooks, I cannot claim that this year or the next will be the year of Linux. Just set aside your passion for this lovely operating system of ours and try to rethink objectively: does the announcements in Computex will have any positive impact on Linux? Or is it just "Computex?"

 Hit the comments!

 

Windows 7 release date near Ubuntu's 9.10

Microsoft announced the release of Windows 7 to be on October 22.  I can't help to think that this is planned as a way to take the wind out of the sails of the Ubuntu 9.10 release, since the code for Windows 7 is planned on being done by July.

 Is it a ploy?  Will Windows 7 steal all the headlines from Ubuntu's 9.10?  The saga continues......

 

How to fix Firefox's semi-fullscreen problem

I have read quite about this problem on sites like the Ubuntu Forums.  But so far the "solutions" do not actually seem to solve the problem, rather temporarily fix it, and I believe that I have found a solution to this problem.

If you have this particular problem, Firefox will look similar to the image below when you open it.  You will have no task bar, no title bar, nothing but the browsers contents.

 

Ok so now on to the solution:

 1.) Press F11 twice and it should go from looking like the image above, to the image below.

As you will have undoubtedly noticed, the task bar and title bar are visible and it looks as if Firefox is simply maximized.

2.) Drag Firefox partially off screen (may only work if compiz is running, I'm not sure) and shrink it to a likeable "un-maximized" size.

 

3.) Now all you need to do is drag it back onto your screen and the problem is resolved.

I think the problem is caused by javascript resizing windows, but it has only happened a few times and I am no expert.  This solution solves the problem until, obviously, it is altered again.  If anyone knows for sure what causes this, please, by all means post a comment explaining it.

Good Luck

 

Bing is not Google, but it is a spin engine.

Microsoft is at the beginning of a major product launch, called Bing, in an attempt to catch up to Google in search, following the collapse of Microsoft's take-over attempt of Yahoo.  While Bing is a re-branding of Microsoft's clunky distant third place "Live Search" search service, Bing is also an attempt to add new features to search.  Microsoft calls Bing a decision engine, in that it purports to offer more comparisons in its search results, rather than the simple blue links which have characterized search up to the recent arrival of Wolfram Alpha.  

But rather than a search engine or even a "decision engine", Bing also appears to be a spin engine, in that it provides partisan answers to controversial topics, such as Steve Ballmer's propensity to throw chairs to blow off stress.  At a friend's suggestion, I typed the following phrases (without quotes) into both Google.com and Bing.com.  The results are very telling.  Be sure to look at the phrase completion options that you are offered as you type.  

"linux "

"antitrust microsoft"

"ballmer throws chair"

"bill gates steals"

The important thing here is not whether Bill Gates does, in fact, steal, and I am not here to make ad hominem attacks on the world's richest man.  The point is how Microsoft deals with criticism.  With spin.  As opposed to Google, which just repeats much of the criticism of it.  

For example, the first phrase, Linux, when typed into Bing, yielded phrase-completion suggestions linked to comparisons of Linux and Microsoft products.  By contrast, the same phrase when typed into google leads to information that a GNU-Linux user would actually want, such as information on different Linux distros.  

The second phrase produced no phrase-completion results at all in Bing.  Google yielded the records in the actual case.

Same for the third phrase.  Bing returned no suggestions at all for "Ballmer thr", whereas that same incomplete phrase yields "ballmer throw chair" and "Ballmer throwing chair" in Google.

As to the fourth phrase, Bing returned "bill gates steve jobs" and "bill gates steps down" for "bill gates ste".  But add an "a" to the end of that search, "bill gates stea" and you get nothing under Bing.

In short, Microsoft is always partisan, whereas Google is more informative, Microsoft couldn't even do so much as suggest phrases that would lead the reader look at official court records regarding its anti-trust trials, or anything else that reflected negatively on it.  

Contrast that with phrases that are negative for Google, such as "Google is evil."  Typing "Google is e" yields no suggestions.  But typing in "Google is" yield results which are both positive and negative for Google as a company:

"Google is your friend"
"Google is broken"
"Google is skynet"
"Google is making us stupid"
"Google is a number"
"Google is paying to work from home"
"Google is always right"
"Google is taking over the world"
"Google is watching you"
"Google is paying"

More to the point is the first phrase.  Microsoft's first suggestions all are aimed at diverting attention away from one of its keenest competition, Free Open Source Software, a competitor which, every year in its official annual 10k SEC-mandated warning to investors, Microsoft lists as a threat to its profitability.

Compare that to Google's suggested results for its main global competitor, Baidu, a Chinese search engine which holds about 60% of search results in China to Google's approximate 32%.  Google's suggested phrase-completions return first a Chinese character hyperlink to Baidu; second to an English-language hyperlink for Google's arch rival; and trailing below that are all viable suggestions for Baidu.com or Baidu MP3 or Baidu Video.  

Clearly, it is more important for Microsoft to put its spin on your results, compared with Google, which is more concerned with giving you information that is probably useful to you, even if it is negative for Google.  

Which raises a question: who at Microsoft is responsible for skewing results this way?  Does Chairman Bill know about this?  I'll bet he does.  Same for Ballmer.  These two men have reputations for cut-throat competition, and yielding no quarter to their competition.  Which is the real lesson to be learned here.  Google has thrived despite competition.  Microsoft has succeeded only where it can choke out competition, as in leveraging its Microsoft Windows desktop monopoly.  Where Microsoft has to compete, such as in search or in on-line video delivery or even in game consoles, it comes in second or even third.

Clearly, Bing is not Google, and is not going to overtake Google anytime use, nor offer information which, on the whole, is as useful to its users as Google search results.  

By the way, the most concise summary of why Google is beating Microsoft can be seen by typing this phrase into your browser: Bingisnotgoogle.com.  Google is always one step ahead of Redmond. 

 

antiX M8.2 Test 2 now available and looking better than ever!

antiX M8.2 Test 2 now available and looking better than ever!

In my previous blog, I reported that antiX M8.2 Test 1 is now available and looking great. I then went on to explain the many reasons why I enjoy using, testing, and promoting antiX so much. The Test 2 release is now available; anticapitalista has already, along with some community members, identified a few more things that will be changed, but Test 2 is looking better than ever. In fact, if someone wants to install Test 2, then simply use it as their lean, fast system, I see nothing in the capabilities or in what is "lacking" that would prevent someone from doing just that.

Yesterday I took antiX M8.2 Test 2 and installed it on my Lenovo Y410 laptop in place of antiX M8.0, using the option to save my /home partition. You generally do not rewrite the disk partition when you this technique; instead the installation program removes the old packages and installs the new packages. It works extremely well and effectively. I claim that for many people this Test 2 version would work fine, even as an every day system. I have it installed and I have no hesitation in using it.

 

The possibilities of Servlet 3.0 and JavaEE 6

Explore the different implementations of developing with Comet. See how popular Java Web servers like Jetty and Tomcat have enabled Comet applications, and learn how to program with each server. And finally, learn about the standardization proposals for Comet in Java that are part of the upcoming Servlet 3.0 and JavaEE 6 specifications.
 

Google Chrome

I still do not understand why Google does not provide Linux installers for this browser. I am using it under  Win XP (in a VM of course) and pretty happy with the performance. I am not a programmer but if they can make Picasa to run under Linux (with WINE), they could do the same for Chrome. Then they could release the Linux-native installation files.

I really want to use Chrome under Linux and try the Wave but I do not want to boot the virtual machine and switch back and forth.

Anyway, I hope it will worth the wait.

 

Media Center Issues...

I do not understand why this common commercial operating system is trying to trick the users as if the only Media Center is available for Vista and 7. There are a lot of Media Center programs for Linux, from Live CDs to full-fledged home automation systems. I spent a weekend going through MythTV, XBMC, eAROS and Linux MCE in detail and I absolutely saw nothing less than the Windows' Media Center. In no way, XBMC or MythTV falls short; if you want to discuss about Linux MCE,  Microsoft needs some more years to do the half of it.

So, in this perspective I wonder if the distributions and their communities are falling short of advertising the media center capabilities? Just think about a new convert from Windows to -say openSUSE: how will he know that a media center program (or programs) is available for his computer.

Why did I point to this issue: I am putting my hands on any device I see here in my country and always media center capabilities are in the top displayed features. Think about HP, Sony, Acer and all the big guys showing how elegant their media centers are. In fact they are not showing the Windows' native media center but rather their own. I know it is not more than eye-candy but in terms of this "eye candy" that the end users value, Windows has a long way to go, considering at least the Compiz Fusion.

I wonder if the developers or the foundations/companies can also put a media center in their default installations and advertise this with the screenshots and other media? I think this will close another gap (which is unexistent by the way) which users ask "can I do everything in Linux that I can do in Windows?"

 
Page 116 of 148

Upcoming Linux Foundation Courses

  1. LFS101 Introduction to Linux
    01 Jan » 31 Dec - Online Self-Paced
    Details
  2. LFS201 Essentials of System Administration
    01 Jan » 31 Dec - Online Self-Paced
    Details
  3. LFS201-Esp Fundamentos de Administración de Sistemas Linux
    01 Jan » 31 Aug - Online Self-Paced
    Details

View All Upcoming Courses


Who we are ?

The Linux Foundation is a non-profit consortium dedicated to the growth of Linux.

More About the foundation...

Frequent Questions

Join / Linux Training / Board