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dstat Tool to Monitor Processor, Memory, Network Performance on Linux Server

Dstats is a versatile resource statistic tool. This tool combines the ability of iostat, vmstat, netstat, and ifstat. Dstat allow us to monitor the linux server resources in real-time. When you need to gather those information real-time, dstat will fit your need.

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How to setup Virtualbox guest additions on Fedora 20

Fedora 20 (Heisenbug) is currently the latest release and if you want to try it on VirtualBox then install the guest additions for full functionality. Installation is simple and takes a few steps, but involves download and updates which would require some bandwidth. 1. Update Fedora The first thing to do is to upgrade all packages and make the system uptodate. $ sudo yum distro-sync 2. Install kernel headers and build tools VirtualBox guest additions are...
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18 things I did after installing Fedora 20, the Xfce spin

Fedora with Xfce Dis-preference for Gnome 3 and un-necessity of KDE is the reason why I mostly choose the Xfce desktop when working on or trying out newer or unknown distros. And when working at length, I always choose to tune the desktop to my whims. Xfce is perfect when productivity is high on priority but not at the cost of functionality or looks either. And this post compiles a list of better-ments I...
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Steps to Install Wine 1.7.11 on CentOS, RHEL and Fedora

Wine is an Open Source implementation of the Windows API and will always be free software. Approximately half of source code is written by its volunteers, and remaining effort sponsored by commercial interests, especially CodeWeavers.

 

Read complete article at Install Wine 1.7.11 on CentOS, RHEL and Fedora. This article will help you to install Wine 1.7.11 using source code by compiling it.

 

Unleashing the Best Open Source Social Networking Software

The open source community plays an important role in the social networking space. It helps individuals create their own social network easily. With the software featured in this article, users can take more control of their site, and help establish and maintain a connection between users of the site.

New social networking platforms keep appearing from every corner. Unlike newcomers, all of the mature software packages featured here are professional, have a good feature set, and are easy to install and configure.

<A HREF="http://www.linuxlinks.com/article/2014011804122865/SocialNetworking.html">Read more</A>

 

Using preload to Speed up Linux

Preload is an ‘Adaptive Read-ahead Damon’, which is the equivalent to Windows Vista’s Superfetch. Effectively what it does is speeds up application load time by monitoring the software that is loaded and used day to day, the software used most often, and cache them in memory. If you have a lot of memory, you will notice things will improve – for example, my work machine has 20gb of RAM, 7gb of it is used by caches and everything runs nice and smooth. If your computer needs the memory, space is made, so you will not lose out if you have the average 4-8gb. The difference is certainly measurable – from 20% to 60% improvement in startup times.

Installation is simple – its supported on most platforms, and can be installed through your repository, for example, Debian and Ubuntu people can use the simple apt-get install preload to install the software. For the more adventurous, you can grab the source code fromhttp://sourceforge.net/projects/preload/.

Configuration wise, the defaults will work happily enough, but for the people who like to tinker, configuration can be found in /etc/preload.conf.

Information on configuring preload can be found within the documentation the author has written. This can be found at http://techthrob.com/2009/03/02/drastically-speed-up-your-linux-system-with-preload/preload_files/preload.pdf.

 

Collectl is a powerful tool to monitor system resources on Linux

Monitoring system resources Linux system admins often need to monitor system resources like cpu, memory, disk, network etc to make sure that the system is in a good condition. And there are plenty of commands like iotop, top, free, htop, sar etc to do the task. Today we shall take a look at a tool called collectl that can be used to measure, monitor and analyse system performance on linux. Collectl is a nifty little program that does a lot more than most other tools. It comes with a...

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Nmon – A Nifty Little Tool to Monitor System Resources on Linux

Nmon Nmon (Nigel's performance Monitor for Linux) is another very useful command line utility that can display information about various system resources like cpu, memory, disk, network etc. It was developed at IBM and later released open source. It is available for most common architectures like x86, ARM and platforms like linux, unix etc. It is interactive and the output is well organised similar to htop. Using Nmon it is possible to view the performance of different system resources on a single screen. The man page describes nmon as nmon is is a systems administrator, tuner,...

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Inxi is an amazing tool to check hardware information on Linux

Inxi A very common thing linux users struggle with is to find what hardware has the OS detected and how well. Because unless the OS is aware of the hardware, it might not be using it at all. And there an entire ocean of commands to check hardware information. There are quite a few gui tools like hardinfo, sysinfo etc on the desktop, but having a generic command line tool is far more useful and this is where Inxi works well. Inxi is a set of scripts that will detect a...
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Munich Transition Documentary

Just in general, if someone has connections with anyone over in Munich, what would be the possibility that a documentary covering their decade long migration to Linux could be assembled for the rest of us to understand better all the trials and tribulations that had to be overcome to bring the complete transition to fruition?

 

How to configure vsftpd to use SSL/TLS (FTPS) on CentOS/Ubuntu

Securing FTP Vsftpd is a widely used ftp server, and if you are setting it up on your server for transferring files, then be aware of the security issues that come along. The ftp protocol has weak security inherent to its design. It transfers all data in plain text (unencrypted), and on public/unsecure network this is something too risky. To fix the issue we have FTPS. It secures FTP communication by encrypting it with SSL/TLS. And this post shows how to setup SSL...
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