Linux.com

Community Blogs



How to disable Ipv6 on Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Debian

Ipv6 Ipv6 is the next version of the addressing scheme Ipv4 that is currently being used to assign numerical address to domain names like google.com over the internet. Ipv6 allows for more addresses than what Ipv4 supports. However it is not yet widely supported and its adoption is still in progress. Does your system support ipv6...
Read more... Comment (0)
 

9 ASCII Games You'll Want to Play Again and Again

Text-based games often receive little coverage in the Linux press. However, there are some real ASCII gems out there waiting to be explored which are immensely addictive and great fun to play.


<A HREF="http://www.linuxlinks.com/article/20140621060017503/9ASCIIGames.html">Read on</A>

 

20 things to do after installing Elementary OS 0.2 Luna

Elementary OS Luna Elementary OS is another very cool linux distro based on Ubuntu. It has an intense focus on visual design and user experience. It comes with its own desktop environment called Pantheon that is designed to resemble mac. In this post we are going to tweak elementary OS right after a fresh installation and also install some essential apps to fully load the desktop for the best experience. 1. Enable all software repositories Launch...
Read more... Comment (0)
 

Add a Printer On Linux With CUPS Web Utility

Apple Inc, is seen by many in the open source world as a power hungry and closed technology company. Although it might be the case to some extent, Apple has in fact contributed quite some open source code. The Darwin kernel based on FreeBSD, Webkit which is a open source browser engine and CUPS web utility to name a few are some of the projects Apple has released under GPL. The CUPS web utility is one project that many Linux users simply can't live without. Based on the Internet Printing Protocol (IIP), CUPS has become a standard printing service in many Linux distros, especially the ones that are based no Debian. Many Debian-based distributions like Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Elementary OS, etc are now bundled with the Common Unix Printing System. It was originally developed for Mac OS X and since it was made open source is now used by UNIX like operating systems.

If ou are using a Linux computer and wish to print from it, you should make use of CUPS to configure your printer. Let us take a look at how you can connect a printer with this print server.

  • 1. Most of the popular Linux operating system are pre-loaded with CUPS. To check if your Linux box has CUPS, open up a browser and load the following address, http://localhost:631/

CUPS

img: https://db.tt/BG4yWNPY

If you get a page that looks something like in the image above, congratulations, you already have CUPS in your system. If you get an error, you should probably install it. For Ubuntu and and its derivative, you can use the following code to install it.

sudo apt-get update

sudo apt-get install cups

You should also check if all the CUPS dependensies are also installed and check its status.

dpkg -l cups

service cups status

  • 2. Once you have CUPS installed, visit the address mentioned above from your favorite web browser. Under administrator click on Add Printers and Classes. In the next page click on Add printers and you will have a page that looks like this. You might be asked to enter your username and password to security reasons.

add printer

Image source: https://db.tt/VnVXRJy0

Choose “Internet Printing Protocol (https)” or “HP Printer (HPLIP)” if you have an HP machine. You can also use the https method to install your HP Printer.

  • 3. In the next page you will be required to add an IP address. This is the IP address of your printer. The IP of your printer could be easily found out using the following terminal commands.

ifconfig

iwconfig

If the printer is connected to a server the IP address of the server is going to the the IP of the printer, as well. It could look something like this, socket://10.34.23.21, along with the port number if need be.

  • 4. You will now be asked for a Name, Description and Location of the printer. You can enter whatever you want in this these fields and also choose sharing option.

Add printer

Img: https://db.tt/q0f9Ve0n

  • 5. In the next page, you will be able to choose your printer using the Make and Model name. If you don't find your model in the printer, you can use your PPD file to configure the machine. Most of the PPD files could be downloaded from the printer manufacturers support website, a simple Google search will help you find the necessary PPDs. Once you have downloaded the PPD, you can browse to the folder using the CUPS interface and add the printer.
  • 6. Once the printer has been added, you can find your printer in the CUPS home page, using the following address http://localhost:631/

The machine is now ready for printing. You can now configure it, and queue jobs. Using the above steps, you will be able to add multiple printers to your Linux machine.

With the help of CUPS, installing a printer in a Linux machine is not as intimidating as it used to be in the old days even though you might have to use the terminal a couple of times. However on the downside, it might be impossible for you to find the ink level in your printer directly from the machine, like how you could do it with proprietary software provided by the manufacturer for Windows. So the next time you are buying printer ink, make sure you buy more supplies from Ink Station and Amazon for backup.

 

9 commands to check hard disk partitions and disk space on Linux

In this post we are taking a look at some commands that can be used to check up the partitions on your system. The commands would check what partitions there are on each disk and other details like the total size, used up space and file system etc. Commands like fdisk, sfdisk and cfdisk are general partitioning...
Read more... Comment (1)
 

20 things to do after installing Linux Mint 17 Qiana Cinnamon

Linux Mint 17 Qiana Cinnamon Linux Mint 17 has been released and is named Qiana. Mint is one of the best linux distros that targets desktop users with focus on usability and simplicity. It comes in various flavors with different desktop environments like Mate and Cinnamon and different base distros like Ubuntu or Debian. In this post we are playing with the cinnamon edition of Linux Mint 17. More information about the Cinnamon edition (including download links) can be...
Read more... Comment (0)
 

Conky disappears on clicking desktop on Linux Mint Cinnamon ? Fix it

Conky on Linux Mint 17 Cinnamon I recently installed Conky on Linux Mint 17 Cinnamon and chose the Gotham theme widgets to display on the desktop. However the next minute I noticed, that on going to the desktop by clicking the show desktop applet on the panel, made the conky widgets disappear. I checked all configurations in Conky Manager and tried to find any relevant option to control this behaviour but...
Read more... Comment (0)
 

How to enable testing and unstable repository on Debian

Testing/Unstable sources The testing and unstable repositories of Debian provide with a higher version of software applications than what is present in the stable repository. Note that these names are actually aliases such that the stable repository points to the current Debian stable release and the Testing repository is what is going to be part of the next Debian stable release. So at the time of this post, Wheezy 7.x is the Stable release and...
Read more... Comment (0)
 

12 Remarkable Free Shell Scripting Books

The focus of this article is to select the finest shell scripting books which are available to download for free. Many of the books featured here can also be freely distributed. So get reading, learning and sharing.

<A HREF="http://www.linuxlinks.com/article/20140612145838315/ShellScriptingBooks.html">Article</A>

 

How to get gorgeous looking fonts on Linux Mint

Fonts In this post I am going to show you how to optimize font rendering on Linux Mint to get the best looking fonts. Linux Mint uses the Sans font by default on the desktop, that do not look that very nice on lcd monitors. So we shall do some tweaks to get great looking fonts on the desktop. The tweaks involve the following changes 1. Use Droid fonts on desktop 2. Use Noto fonts...
Read more... Comment (0)
 

Linux Kernel 3.15 Stable is Now Available! Install/Upgrade to Linux Kernel 3.15 in Ubuntu/Linux Mint

     "The Linux Kernel 3.15 is now available for the users", announced Linus Torvalds. Just check what Linus wrote on the mailing list:
So I ended up doing an rc8 because I was a bit worried about some
last-minute dcache fixes, but it turns out that nobody seemed to even
notice those. We did have other issues during the week, though, so it
was just as well. The futex fixes and cleanups may stand out, but as
usual there's various other random fixes since rc8 in there too:
mainly drivers (drm, networking, sound, usb etc), networking,
scheduling and perf tooling.
But it's all been fairly small and quiet, which *may* of course be due
to the fact that last week was also the first week of the merge window
for 3.16. That might have distracted some developers. I'm not entirely
convinced I liked the overlap, but it seemed to work ok, and unless
people scream really loudly ("Please don't _ever_ do that again") and
give good reasons for doing so, I might end up doing that overlapping
merge window in the future too if it ends up helping out with some
particular timing issue.....

Read More at YourOwnLinux
 
Page 7 of 136

Upcoming Linux Foundation Courses

  1. LFD211 Introduction to Linux for Developers
    08 Dec » 09 Dec - Virtual
    Details
  2. LFS220 Linux System Administration
    08 Dec » 11 Dec - Virtual
    Details
  3. LFD331 Developing Linux Device Drivers
    15 Dec » 19 Dec - Virtual
    Details

View All Upcoming Courses


Who we are ?

The Linux Foundation is a non-profit consortium dedicated to the growth of Linux.

More About the foundation...

Frequent Questions

Join / Linux Training / Board