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How to Setup World of Warcraft on Linux

I wanted to share with everyone a guide that I wrote for a friend a few weeks ago.  Hopefully it may be of some use to people.

 


Here is a quick guide to getting The World of Warcraft working in wine (By the way I am giving you this guide using primarily the command line ... sorry there are easier ways to do it from a GUI, but I am not familiar with them myself ... so I am giving you instructions that I know work because this is the way I do it)

Install lastest version of Wine:

Go to this link: http://www.winehq.org/site/download-deb and follow the instructions to install the latest version of wine. (Make sure to read the whole page there are two things you need to do, also it is all in a GUI so its pretty easy)

Setup Wine for World of Warcraft:

Next open a command terminal and type "winecfg" to start wine configuration screen. 
Change the version of windows on the main screen to "win2000" Click on the "Audio" tab at the top of the window to change wines sound settings.  An error message will pop up ... just click okay (It's wine saying that you haven't set up an audio device yet) Next make sure that ONLY "alsa" is checked marked and click the "okay" button to close the setup window.

There are two methods to proceed from this point.  The easy way is to copy an exsisting install of World of Warcraft from a windows partition, or install thru wine.

1st Method:

Here is the easy way (If you have maintained your WoW updates it is also the quickest when it comes time to update WoW) First navigate to your windows drive "Program Files" folder and copy and paste the "World of Warcraft" folder into the following directory: "/home/$USER/.wine/drive_c/Program Files" (Replace $USER with your user name)\

2nd Method:

Pop in the first install disk wait for an icon of it to appear on your desktop. Open a command terminal and type "cd /media/cdrom (ENTER)" to navigate to the CD. You can type "ls" to list the contents of the directory.  As long as you went to the right cd-drive (Assuming you have more than one) you should see the files on the cd listed. Next type "wine Setup.exe" to start WoW's installer. Go thru the normal install options and let it do it's thing. When it comes time to put in the next CD you need to do a special trick to get wine to release the drive. While keeping the first terminal open (DO NOT CLOSE IT OR YOU HAVE TO START OVER!!) open a second terminal. In the new terminal type "wine eject d:" to open the cd drive. Replace the disk with the next install disk. Before you click on okay in the WoW installer window make sure to Double click on the disk icon (Either on your desktop, or in the "Computer" option under the places menu) to load the replacement disk into the system. Once that is done you can continue on with the installation. Repeat the eject procedure for the remaining three disks. After the installer has completed, World of Warcraft has now been installed into the "/home/$USER/.wine/drive_c/Program Files/World of Warcraft" folder. ($USER being your user name)

Making It Easy to Run World of Warcraft:

Now all you have to do is create a launcher script to make starting WoW easier.  Execute the following command to create a new text file called "wow" in the "/usr/bin" folder and open it in a text editor:

sudo gedit /usr/bin/wow

Once the text editor is open type the following command (or copy and paste) into it:

env WINEPREFIX="/home/$USER/.wine" WINEDEBUG=-all wine "C:\Program Files\World of Warcraft\Wow.exe" -opengl

(Don't worry about changing anything in the above command, when I wrote this I used wildcards to automatically tell the system were stuff is. Alternatively you can replace $USER with your user name and it will still work just fine. I wrote it this way so you can just copy paste it into the file) (Also this script assumes that you only have one user account on the system who intends to play WoW.  If you have more than one user setup on the system that also wants to play WoW you need to change some options which I will explain at the end of this guide)

Now click the save button and close the text editor.  All you have to do now to get World of Warcraft to be easy to start is make the new launcher script you just created executable.
Type the following command (This command just tells the system that this script can be executed):

sudo chmod +x /usr/bin/wow

Your done!  You can now start WoW by either typing "wow" into a terminal, or opening the "Run Dialog" by pressing Alt-F2 and typing "wow"or making a menu icon thru the menu editor and just clicking on it in the menu.

Special Setup Instructions For Systems That Have More than 1 User Account Which Will Run World of Warcraft:

The only change you will make to the above instructions is to setup permissions on your ".wine" folder and modify the start up script. To do this open your "Home" folder in the file manager.
Click the "View" tab at the top of the windows and check mark the box next to "Show Hidden Files" Scroll down until you see the ".wine" folder and right click on it.  Select "Properties" to open the folders properties menu. Click on the "Permissions" tab and change the "Access" for all sections to read:

Folder Access ===>> Create and Delete Files
File Access ===>> Read and Write

Now click on the "close" button to exit the editor.

Lastly you need to make an adjustment to the launcer script from above to point explicitly to the location where World of Warcraft is installed.

Edit the file with the same command from above:

sudo gedit /usr/bin/wow

Change:

env WINEPREFIX="/home/$USER/.wine" WINEDEBUG=-all wine "C:\Program Files\World of Warcraft\Wow.exe" -opengl

To:

env WINEPREFIX="/home/(YOUR USER NAME)/.wine" WINEDEBUG=-all wine "C:\Program Files\World of Warcraft\Wow.exe" -opengl

Save the file and you are done.

Okay easy enuf.... lol sorry man I still tend to do most things from the command line, even though I know that there are easier ways to do it from a GUI. I would bet that you can find guides for a GUI method somewere by searching google.  I have just found over the years it is faster to just hammer it out the old fashioned way.

 

If anyone has any comments or suggestions feel free to let me know.

 

Cheers,

Xipher

 

n00b

Goodness gracious, how many blogs can one girl have?! haha. Honestly I'm not sure I could truly count all the blogs I've created over the years. I am presently maintaining a "personal diary" on a diary website, and have just created another two blogs; one to document my adventures living abroad for my family to see how things are going, and another as a more personal blog, where I intend to share more personal stuff and my views on things.

 But hey, what's one more, right?! I mean after all, this is Linux.com! ;D

I have nothing useful to say right now though, but I just made this account so I thought I should go ahead and post something.

And wow, sharing a blogosphere (yeah I have no idea what to call it, haha) with Linus Torvalds,  talk about exciting! Ok, I sound like a total dope, I know. But Linux is friggin badass amazing, and that's in large part due to him! So I will be fangirl over sharing a blogging world with him. ;D

 Peace out
Mel

 

The Insufferable State of Linux Documentation

I've been waiting for a response from anyone from The Linux Documentation Project (tldp.org). Ghost town projects are normally not such a bad thing - often the page goes down and that's the end of it. Some projects are worth abandoning, as they become obsolete and are replaced by better things.

However, The Linux Documentation Project has been an institution in the Linux Community since 1992. Many of its guides and howtos are still relevant - Linux.com using them is proof enough of that.

The project is in bad need of an overhaul, though. There's little stylistic consistency between pages, the IRC channel (#tldp on freenode) is empty, the mailing lists are no longer a hotbed of activity. The simple steps of getting on the mailing list is made difficult by using an obsolete list program (Mailman could make signing up a snap). You cannot even get anonymous CVS access outside of their ancient CVS viewer.

Half of getting TLDP back on its feet won't even be working with the guides or howto's - it will be addressing the antiquated infrasture of the project itself.

 

Zhu8 On Linux

  就是想来测试一下,貌似新的Linux.com功能很齐全啊!看到kDolphin已经来留了一爪子了。

„ÄÄ„ÄÄPSÔºöË≤剺ºBloggerÂèàÊålj∫ÜÔºåÂîâ……ÂêåÊó∂ÊàëÁúãÂà∞Linux.comÔºåËÆ©ÊàëÊÉ≥Âà∞‰∫ÜOperaÁöÑBlogÊ∞∏‰πÖË¢´GFWԺ剺∞ËÆ°ËøôÈáå……‰∏ç˶ÅËØ¥Êàë‰πåÈ∏¶Âò¥Âïä……

 

A way to find a text string inside all files

# find / -type f -exec grep -l "word" {} \;
 

Learn How to Choose the CMS that’s right for you

Choosing an Open Source CMS is a new book from Packt that guides readers through understanding the different types of CMSs and selecting the one that best fits their needs. Written by Nirav Mehta, this book will help users assess their technical skill level and choose a CMS that combines ease of use with flexibility and power.

Open Source CMSs are the best way to create and manage sophisticated websites. Users can create a website that precisely meets their business goals, and keep the website up-to-date easily because these systems give them full control over every aspect of their website. Open Source CMSs are free to download, and have a vast choice between the various systems.

This book will show users how to avoid choosing the wrong CMS. It will guide users through assessing their website requirements, and based on this assessment, will help identify the CMS that will best fit their needs. It then talks about the major CMSs and the issues that users should consider when choosing, such as their complexity to use, their features, and the power they offer. Users will also be introduced to technical considerations such as programming languages, and compliance with best practice standards in a clear and friendly way.

Additionally, the book highlights many quick-start guides and examples for the most popular CMSs such as WordPress, Joomla! and Drupal. This allows users to experiment with these CMSs, get a feel of how they work, and start using them to build their website. The book also teaches users how to install and customize a CMS with themes and plug-ins. In addition to this, it covers practical tips on hosting, project management, working with specialists and communities, and finding experts.

Developers interested in creating a website by using a good CMS will find this book useful. This book is out now and is available from Packt. For more information, please visit: http://www.packtpub.com/choosing-an-open-source-cms-beginners-guide/book

 

Hello World

Hello World.

–ü—Ä–∏–≤–µ—Ç –ú–∏—Ä.

 

Intro Post

I guess I ought to have an introduction post here on Linux.com.

 I'm a mechanical engineer who loves Linux and has been using it (mostly) full time since 2005.  I got started on Ubuntu using Hoary Hedghog and I haven't looked back.

 I'm currently running Ubuntu Jaunty Jackalope (as of March 2009).  This is the first Ubuntu pre-release I've tried.  It ran well on both my laptop and my desktop.

 I've tried out various incantations of Linux on my laptop in the hopes of getting it working with Linux.  I tried (in no particular order): Mandriva, OpenSUSE, Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Mint, Fedora, Zenwalk,  Linspire, Freespire,Debian, and PCLinuxOS.  I learned how to fix a lot from that laptop; from wireless drivers that just don't work, to graphics cards that act up, to sound issues.

 Now, I'm happily running Ubuntu.  I prefer Gnome to KDE.

I'm an evangelist for the Flock browser; it's my browser of choice when I have a choice.

Well, that's about it... I like using Ubuntu because it's fun to see what my computer can do under Linux, and to show Windows fans what this old hardware can produce.

 

About Sugar!

Sugar is the graphical user interface originally developed for the One Laptop per Child computer/education project and as of May 2008 being developed under the umbrella of Sugar Labs.

Sugar is used on the OLPC XO-1 laptop computer and is also available as a session option on Debian, Ubuntu and Fedora. Unlike more traditional desktop environments, it does not use a "desktop" metaphor and only focuses on one task at a time.

Main contributors to the project include Christopher Blizzard and Marco Pesenti Gritti, Eben Eliason, Tomeu Vizoso, Simon Schampijer, Dan Williams, Walter Bender, Christian Schmidt, Lisa Strausfeld, and Takaaki Okada. The free software community has also contributed greatly to Sugar. Released under the GNU GPL, Sugar is free software.

It is written in the interpreted Python programming language, whereas most other environments are written in a compiled language such as C. Sugar is also referred to as the OLPC Python Environment. It is composed of the Python language, GTK GUI and Gecko HTML engine.

If you want to get involved with it, search by Sugar Group!

 

Disable write

To disable the write command for a user, add the following line in his .bashrc file:
mesg off
You can turn it back by using mesg on or by simply deleting the line from .bashrc.
 

Nagios - A Fork in the Road

Nagios Founder Ethan Galstad comments on the recent fork of Nagios

http://community.nagios.org/2009/05/11/nagios-a-fork-in-the-road/

"Nagios-A fork in the Road"

As many of you know, a recent fork of Nagios has been announced, accompanied with a flurry of activity in both the community and press. An email thread titled "Nagios is dead! Long live Icinga!" began last week on the nagios-devel mailing list to kick this off.

What are my thoughts on this announcement? I think its one of the best things to ever happen to Nagios.

Why? The announcement of the fork, along with the community's reaction to it has brought to light several things:

  • Community interest in furthering Nagios is at an all-time high
  • Community developers want to get more directly involved in the future project direction
  • Nagios development has been slowed by some bottlenecks
  • When the community perceives a problem, the community reacts
  • Communication within the community needs to be improved

This entire event has seen some ugly misconceptions and half-truths lobbed in the direction of Nagios Enterprises, the Nagios Project, the Nagios Community, and myself as an individual. That's unfortunate.

I am disappointed that no one from the Icinga project contacted me directly about this before the decision to fork was made. One of the reasons that was stated for the fork was lack of communication on my part. The unexpected announcement of this fork clearly demonstrates that there are communication problems on both sides of the issue.

 

Many of the individual developers in the Icinga project did what they felt was best in the situation they believed to be true. They appreciated Nagios, wanted to see it succeed, and wanted to play a direct role in its evolution. Many of them have been very active in the Nagios project and community over the years. Their efforts have been much appreciated by both myself and the community as a whole. To those individuals, I pose this question - If what you wanted to do was help create "the" new Nagios interface and be materially involved in the future development of Nagios, why didn't you just ask? It's apparent that we all need to improve our communication and demonstrate better understanding of each other.

In the course of discussions about this fork within the Nagios community, many concerns have been raised, including: the future of Nagios, the Nagios trademark policy, and the commercialization of Nagios.

In an effort to begin to address these concerns, I have penned some of my thoughts in the following write-ups:

Open Source communities are not a panacea. The sky is not always blue. Anyone who tells you otherwise is likely delusional. Community can be great, and community can be frustrating. Ask anyone with long-term involvement in an Open Source project.

It's interesting to watch how individuals and companies react to situations of distress and change. Challenges can bring out the best and worst in all of us. True intentions, motivations, and personal character are often brought to light. I'm sure that the result of all of this will be a stronger Nagios project and community that endures far into the future.

To those of you who would complain about the state of things now or in the future, the time has come to "put up or shut up". If you see the need for change, you must be willing to materially involve yourself and commit your time, effort, and resources to affect that change. Don't assume that someone else will do things for you, and don't complain if they don't.

As things move forward, I can almost certainly guarantee you that you will not always get what you want and things will not always be done the way you want them to. Neither I, nor anyone else involved in the Nagios project, will attempt to please everyone. That is neither possible, nor beneficial to the overall effort.

I would suggest that we need one more fork for Nagios. That being a mental fork - a change in mindset - rather than a code fork. Lets all work together to improve the way we think, communicate, and affect the direction of Nagios for the better.

Are changes necessary? Yes. Will changes happen? Yes. Is Nagios dead? Hardly.

 Author:  Ethan Galstad

http://community.nagios.org/2009/05/11/nagios-a-fork-in-the-road/

 

 

 
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