Linux.com

Home Linux Community Community Blogs

Community Blogs



Formatting blogs for Linux.com

Lets face it, all blogging systems and wysiwyg (What You See Is What You Get) editors have some quirks that the user must work around, particularly when you attempt to paste a pre-built formatted document into the blog system. In the case of the Linux.com Blog system it retains most of the original formatting including text size which may not appear well once it is published in html. For that reason I am here to share my trick with the other users of the blog system so everyone can have well formatted tutorials and blog posts.

 

Lets cut to the chase


In efforts to allow you more time to write your own posts we can jump to my major points.

  1. Do not write your posts in a formatted application, use only a text editor.
  2. Write the post in html using standard flags such as headings, breaks, paragraphs, ordered lists and unordered lists.
  3. Paste your text based file into the Plain Text tab, then add the pictures, hyperlinks, special characters and touchups in the formtted view which will be inthe Rich Text tab.
  4. Keep it simple, by using only the headers and default font formatting rather than specifying the text size you allow the users to change their browser setting to fit their own preferences rather than forcing your own preferences.
  5. All formatting flags except for horizontal rules and line breaks must be started and ended.

 

 

Available HTML flags


Now that you know to write the original document in HTML, it is time share the flags that you can use.

  • Flags with terminators - all Of the followin flags must be terminated to end the formatting.
    • Paragraph - <p> - This flag is used to notate where a paragraph starts and ends, the ending flag is the paragraph with a / character - </p>.
    • Bold - <b> - This flag is used to indicate where bold text starts and ends, the ending flag includes the / character - </b>.
    • Italic - <i> - This flag is used to indicate where italic text starts and ends, the ending flag includes the / character - </i>.
    • Underline - <u> - This flag is used to indicate where underlined text starts and ends, the ending flag includes the / character - </u>.
    • Headings - The heading flags indicate where Headings/Larger Font text starts and ends, there are four size which are numbered 1-4 from Largest to Smallest such as <h1>, the ending flag includes the / character such as </h1>. Generally I do my Section Headings in H2 and the subsections in H3.
    • Lists - The list flags are special because you must start list with <ol> for ordered lists or <ul> for unordered lists. You must then notate each list item with between <li> and </li>. Remember that the list sets must be terminated with </ol> or </ul> depending on which type you are using.
  • Flags without terminators
    1. Line Returns - <br /> - The line returns are used to terminate a line.
    2. Horizontal Line - <hr /> - The Horizontal Lines create a single line across your posts which are useful for seperating sections.

Some additional flags such as adding a hyperlink, a picture or a video can be added, but I recommend using the formatting tools in the Rich Text tab to guarantee that the placement is where you want it. The same can be said for special characters which you will see when you review the text for this post.

 

Now to make this easier I have posted the html formatted text for this post to pastebin so you can reference it to see what formatting I used.

I hope you learned something and if you have any other hints to share please post them in the comments.

 

Welcome New Linux Foundation Corporate Members

If you have been watching the new feeds you may have noticed that many new corporate members have joined the Linux Foundation lately. Most of the new additions have been big name companies, but the two most recent additions have gotten me very excited.

Read more... Comment (0)
 

How to download RSS feeds with a simple script

After a bit of studying and testing, I have found a  very simple way to download RSS feeds from the command line. It works very well, except (in some cases) with encoding. The whole script with explanations is here. Thank you in advance for any help with the encoding problem!

 

Meet the Ultimate Guru Laptop

As some of the reader may be aware, I was awarded the title of the 2011 Linux.com Ultimate Guru for my contributions to the site and the Linux Foundation. What you may not know is that the title came with two major rewards, an invitation to the 2001 Linux Collaboration Summit and the Dream Linux based laptop. In this post I will introduce you to my Ultimate Guru laptop and review it for people who are looking for a good laptop.

 

Read more... Comment (0)
 

openSUSE Weekly News 182 is out!

The Weekly News Team is pleased to announce the Weekly News Issue 182.

In this Issue:

  • openSUSE Continues Brazilian Blaze!
  • Google Summer of Code Reports
  • Frédéric Crozat: Status update on systemd for openSUSE Factory
  • SUSE Studio: Using AutoYaST for customizing your appliance on first boot
  • and many more ...

You can download it there:

We hope you enjoy the reading :-)

If you want to help us collecting interesting articles for the openSUSE Weekly News, so you can all your stuff into our new ietherpad: http://os-news.ietherpad.com/2.

Found Bugs? Please place it in our Bugtracker: http://developer.berlios.de/bugs/?group_id=12095

Features, Ideas and Improvements can placed in our Featuretracker: http://developer.berlios.de/feature/?group_id=12095

Older content can be found there.

Flattr this: http://flattr.com/thing/135641/openSUSE-Weekly-News

 

Jenkins Continuous Integration Server: An Essential Software Development Tool

Continuous integration (CI) is a software engineering practice that aims to minimize software development time while applying rigorous quality control from the beginning and at every step of the process. If you’re ready to jump on the CI bandwagon, turn to the Open Source Continuous Integration Server called Jenkins

 

How to remove duplicate files on Linux without wasting time

Here's how I do it, with a couple of simple scripts

 

 

Major gaps of Open Office Impress versus Microsoft Power Point: what do you think?

Yesterday Sergio, a user of OpenOffice Impress, sent to the OpenOffice.org discussion list his list of the “Major Gaps of OpenOffice Impress 3.3 vs. Microsoft Office PowerPoint” because “after struggling for over 1 year, sadly he had to stop using Open Office Impress and go back to Microsoft Power Point”. After speaking with Sergio, I reformatted and put online his list of complaints to gather more feedback. Please have a look at it. I am particularly curious to know if with LibreOffice it would be different.

 

Seven photo-archiving tips and the Linux tools to help you

I recently posted my favourite seven rules to manage digital photographs under Linux. What are yours?

 

 

 

openSUSE Weekly News 181 is out!

We are pleased to announce our new openSUSE Weekly News 181.

In this Issue:

  • openSUSE Milestone 2
  • Google Summer of Code Reports
  • Sebastian Kügler: Plasma Active updates
  • ZDNet/Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols: Firefox 5: New, but improved?
  • and many more ...

You can download it there:

We hope you enjoy the reading :-)

If you want to help us collecting interesting articles for the openSUSE Weekly News, so you can all your stuff into our new ietherpad: http://os-news.ietherpad.com/2.

Found Bugs? Please place it in our Bugtracker: http://developer.berlios.de/bugs/?group_id=12095

Features, Ideas and Improvements can placed in our Featuretracker: http://developer.berlios.de/feature/?group_id=12095

Older content can be found there.

 

 

MultiPath TCP in the Linux Kernel

MultiPath TCP is an extension to TCP to transmit data of a single connection over multiple interfaces simultaneously. (http://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/mptcp)

This allows a better throughput and better resilience in case of link-failures.

We have an implementation of MultiPath TCP in the Linux Kernel.

Visit http://inl.info.ucl.ac.be/mptcp/ to try out and contribute to our open-source project.

 

 

 

Read more... Comment (0)
 
Page 16 of 133

Who we are ?

The Linux Foundation is a non-profit consortium dedicated to the growth of Linux.

More About the foundation...

Frequent Questions

Join / Linux Training / Board