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Samba 4.0.10 Released – Fixes Some Major Bugs

Samba is a software that uses TCP/IP protocol to enable interaction between Microsoft Windows and other systems (like Unix, Linux etc.). It is a popular tool for file transfers across the systems. A new version of Samba 4.0.10 has been released on 8th October 2013. It is the latest stable release that includes fixes to the following major bugs.

 

Elementary OS 0.2 Luna – now that’s more like it

Elementary OS - Luna Elementary OS 0.2 Luna is a linux distro that has become quite popular recently. It is based on Ubuntu and designed to look somewhat like a mac. There have been many attempts to get a mac like feel on the linux desktop and Pear OS is the most significant one. However all of them fall short somewhere or the other. Elementary introduces a new desktop environment called Pantheon that achieves a lot. First of all it gives a mac like look and feel, but most importantly it makes the desktop remarkably simple and productive. I think I shall use it on notebook and those desktops where I don't code. I have been using KDE for the last decade and never moved out of it. Never liked gnome, never needed xfce or any of those light desktops. But elementary seems something irresistible. Not only are the looks elegant and beautiful, the usability is remarkable compared to other more common desktop environments like Gnome or Unity. Elementary has the perfect balance of style and usability and this would no doubt make it a very popular distro. Now lets take a quick tour of this brand new linux distro that you would love, if you want to be fashionable and show off. Yeah really. elementary on a sleek ultra thin notebook would make the macs envious!! Onto the desktop The desktop is well drawn and painted. The wallpapers are quite pleasant. Infact its the first time I see such good looking wallpapers packed by default with a distro. As for the fonts, elementary is smart enough to use the Droid fonts which definitely is one of the best. The wallpaper and font selections definitely make a lot of sense and there is nothing wrong in what elementary developers claim on their website elementary is crafted by designers and developers who believe that computers can be easy, fun, and gorgeous. By putting design first, we ensure we're not compromising on quality or usability. On the top left is the menu for accessing applications which is called the Slingshot. It has 2 modes of display, either only icons, or icons with categories on the left. And at the base you see Plank, the dock for icons. It is configurable and has a very decent appearance. Elementary uses its own window manager called Gala. It is considered to be very resource consuming, so you would need high CPU power or a dedicated graphics unit for elementary to work smoothly. Otherwise cpu usage would rise high making the system sluggish. Gnome and KDE all have desktop effects but they are all very raw in nature. They just keep showing the user with all possible desktop effects that could be created. Elementary on the other hand has very balanced mixture of various effects...
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A Simple BASH Script to Test Your Internet Connectivity

Most of the users all over the world make use of Google's Index Page to check whether their Internet connection is working or not.  Many times it is required to check periodically whether the server you are running is connected to internet or not. It is very cumbersome to open the web page every time you wish to check the connection. As an alternative, it definitely makes sense to run some scripts in the background periodically scheduling them using cron.

Read More on YourOwnLinux...

 

How To : Configure Ubuntu as a Router

INTRODUCTION

If you are having two network interface cards or some other component that connects you to the internet along with a network interface card installed in your ubuntu system, it can be transformed into an immensely powerful router. You can establish basic NAT (Network Address Translation), activate port forwarding, form a proxy, and prioritize traffic observed by your system so that your downloading stuff do not intervene with gaming. This article will explicate setting up your ubuntu system as a router which can later be configured as a firewall with prior knowledge of 'IPTables'. The resulting setup will help you to control traffic over ports and make your system less vulnerable to security breaches.

 

Read More at YourOwnLinux

 

Kernel Crash Seen In case of VLAN Tagged ICMP packets

Hi Friends,

I am using Windriver customized kernel 3.0 based on main line Linux version 2.6.27.18

Getting Kernel crash In case of Vlan Tagged ICMP packets. Please find below stack trace for the crash.

 

Kindly help me in analysing the trace and to identify the main culprit.

[<ffffffff81154108>] warn_on_slowpath+0x58/0x90

[<ffffffff8115bd20>] local_bh_enable+0x88/0xf8

[<ffffffff81344a44>] dev_queue_xmit+0x144/0x688

[<ffffffff81301f04>] bond_dev_queue_xmit+0x44/0x178

[<ffffffff81302408>] bond_xmit_activebackup+0xb0/0xe8

[<ffffffff81344ea4>] dev_queue_xmit+0x5a4/0x688

[<ffffffff813d59b4>] vlan_dev_hwaccel_hard_start_xmit+0x8c/0xa0

[<ffffffff81344ea4>] dev_queue_xmit+0x5a4/0x688

[<ffffffff81377cbc>] ip_push_pending_frames+0x37c/0x4c0

[<ffffffff813a0768>] icmp_reply+0x170/0x290

[<ffffffff813a0a58>] icmp_echo+0x58/0x68

[<ffffffff813a11b4>] icmp_rcv+0x334/0x390

[<ffffffff813721a4>] ip_local_deliver_finish+0x13c/0x2d8

[<ffffffff813718c4>] ip_rcv_finish+0x134/0x510

[<ffffffff81343af4>] netif_receive_skb+0x41c/0x5d8

[<ffffffff81343d58>] process_backlog+0xa8/0x160

[<ffffffff8134186c>] net_rx_action+0x194/0x2e8

[<ffffffff8115b71c>] __do_softirq+0x114/0x288

[<ffffffff8115b910>] do_softirq+0x80/0x98

[<ffffffff8115bb8c>] irq_exit+0x64/0x78

[<ffffffff81100e40>] plat_irq_dispatch+0xd0/0x1d0

[<ffffffff81120c80>] ret_from_irq+0x0/0x4

[<ffffffff81120ea0>] r4k_wait+0x20/0x40

[<ffffffff81123414>] cpu_idle+0x34/0x60

 

Thanks in Advance

Gautam

 

An introduction to Linux Deepin’s way of innovation

Author: Andy Stewart, co-founder and leader of the Linux Deepin team

Note: This article is translated from this page.

 

When Linux Deepin team was organized two years ago, we already have a clear idea of what a perfect deskop operating system would be like. Over the last two years, our team has grown from several people to more than 30 members. We've always had a clear-cut goal, that is, to make a Linux operating system with the best interactive user experience.

 

Our view about interactive experience


In our opinion, the criteria for good interactive experience are as follows:

1. It's not the users' job to work out the details

There are lots of things to learn about Linux. Programmers can examine underlying algorithms. Designers can do visual studies. Experts in other subjects can do research in their fields. However, ordinary users will basically need to listen to the music, watch movies or the like.

Traditionally, Linux users, especially Chinese users, have to spend days to get fonts, character encodings and codecs working properly. Sometimes they go to extremes to get bleeding-edge versions of underlying libraries. I am a geek myself. I never use a mouse when coding and I use Emacs to get everything done. I also lived the days when I was full of enthusiasm and spend days and nights playing with my system. However, as time goes by, I would rather see that things *JUST* work and do not need configuration after installation.

So We have put the idea into practice. The arduous and daunting configurations are already done by Deepin. All users need to do is enjoy.

2. Good interactive design is not just about themes.

Some people who work with the command line every day still think of interactive design as good-looking themes. In fact, good themes merely give pleasure to the eyes. However, interactive design comes from deep thoughts about humanity. Based on the research, we make decisions and feedback which are considered natural and meet users' expectations.

Let's take DSnapshot and DPlayer as examples.

1). Perhaps the best screenshot tool with GUI before DSnapshot was Shutter. What did we do if we wanted to take a screenshot and share it with a friend?

Steps: Take a screenshot -> Save it -> Open the picture and edit it -> Save it again -> Upload to social websites

Users could not edit the picture immediately after the screenshot had been taken. They had to save it, open it for editing, save it again and then open a browser or use other tools to upload it.

Let's see what our users really need?

a). Select the area to take a screenshot as they wish;

b). Edit it immediately if they need to;

c). Share it with friends once the previous preparations are done.

So what we need to do is get rid of the unneccessary steps and only "bother" our users where choices are needed. Taking a screenshot, editing it and sharing - no extra steps. The simplest way to realize user experience is the best interactive design.

2). What does DPlayer do when it is minimized?

Let's analyze why a user who was focusing on a movie wants to minimize the player? Because he/she has other things to do. What is he/she going to do when he/she's finished? That's right. He/she's going to continue to watch the movie.

So what do WE do now? When the user minimize DPlayer, we pause the movie for him/her. When he/she restored the player window, we continue to play the movie. This is basically what interactive design is like. When the user needs to pause, we help him/her pause it. When they come back, we help them play it.

As is shown above, it is the details that we care most about.

3). What do users do when they've finished installing an application in the Software Center?

They'll need to launch it. And no, they don't need to go to the launcher menu to start them. We give them a startup button on the app's page. Users don't have to worry about where the application was installed. They can just click the button and launch it.

 

Linux Deepin is *NOT* reinventing the wheel. They are creating an excellent interactive design.

 

Many Chinese Linux fans often ask us the question, "Why are you reinventing the wheel when there are so many distributions out there?" So I think we need to make our point clear. The powerful tools on Linux is beyond counting, but they rarely give the pleasure to an ordinary user as being considered easy to use.

It is not the answer to the question that matters. What surprised us is that lovely monomania deeply rooted in the heart of Linux techies, who work with git, patches, mailing lists, IRC and bugs everyday. In China, a misunderstanding about Linux is always around. On one hand, ordinary people tend to think Linux is for experts. On the other hand, the enthusiasm of Linux users has, to some degree, developed into some sort of religion. The techies love to make Linux a symbol of expert. They wouldn't see their lovely toy ended up as easy to use for newbies. Some even obstruct efforts to make Linux available for average computer users.

We all love Linux. Any efforts on Free and Open Source, being it on underlying algorithms or simply making Linux easy to use, are worth praising. We are all working for a better Linux with more users and great future.

 

Linux Deepin has always been leading the Chinese way of Open Source.

 

Linux Deepin has contributed heavily to the Free and Open Source world. The projects we created in the past two years are shown below:

a). Deepin Software Center

b). DSnapshot

c). DMusic

d). DPlayer

e). Deepin Desktop Environment

We'll bring more innovative design to the world, such as desktop apps, community tools and many other unprecedented creations.

 

As we are moving forward faster than ever before, we are facing considerable challenges. Every week, we receive about 30 to 50 bug reports or suggestions from our users.

For example:

a). Add a launcher icon for DSnapshot;

b). Provide a weather forecast item for Taipei (P.R. China) in the weather widget;

c). Give a switch to users to turn on/off automatic updates in the Software Center.

....

So how are we going to make our System and apps stable and deal with improvement suggestions from our users? If Linux Deepin only focused on new features and wouldn't listen to feedback, their product would be like many other desktop distributions. It wouldn't be like those predecessors as being average and unbearable as to details.

Suggestions from users, no matter how "trivial" the idea may seem, would be accepted as long as we think it will improve user experience.

Therefore, we decided to spend one working day each week to deal with feedback and known issues. Now we are investing 80 percent of our time in innovation and 20% in improvement.

In a word, we are taking 20 percent of our time to improve user experience as we are rapidly making innovations.

 

Precise Puppy 5.7.1 review – a small and swift linux distro

Puppy Linux - the Precise variant Precise Puppy is a puppy linux variant that is "based" on Ubuntu 12.04 precise. It is designed as a small and fast distro that can run on older hardware with low resources. It is intended to be run in live mode rather than installing on the hard drive. The iso file can be burnt to a disc or put on a flash drive and it would boot like any other linux distro. I always wanted to try puppy linux and this time I finally got my hands on it. Version 5.7.1 was recently released. So what is puppy linux. Well, if you don't already know, puppy linux is not a distinct distro by itself. It is more of a concept with lots of distros being build on it. For example precise puppy is a puppy linux variant built using packages from ubuntu precise. Similarly there is slacko puppy that is based on slackware. The term "based on" is not very strict in sense and should not be mistaken for a trimmed down version of a large distro. It is more of a compatibility factor such that packages from a larger distros are used to build the particular puppy variant. You might be surprised to know how many puppies are there in the town. Check this link to find out. Archpup, Attackpup, Macpup, pup .... pup .... pup ... So in this post we are focussing on precise puppy 5.7.1 Download and run Puppy linux distros are always small in size compared to other larger distros. Most are within 150MB and although that is not really small, but doesn't matter. There are distros that are smaller, damn small linux for example. You should be able to find the precise puppy distros at http://distro.ibiblio.org/quirky/. Navigate to the directory for version 5.7.1 and download the right iso. You would find lots of "retro" builds. Retros are those builds which have additional software/driver to support older hardware. This makes them larger in size. I am trying out puppy on an old Samsung N110 netbook (not very old). It has a dual core intel atom processor with 1 GB ram. It has Lubuntu installed, which works fine, till you fire too many applications or browser tabs, which would lead to a clear speed lag. You can try it inside virtualbox if you want to. Virtualbox would allow to set the hardware configuration parameters like ram and cpu so it can be tested in a restricted environment. I used unetbootin to put the puppy iso on a flash drive. Easy enough and works the same way as any other distro. Onto the desktop Puppy boots right into its Jwm desktop which is very colorful like kid...
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25+ examples of Linux find command – search files from command line

Linux find command The Linux find command is a very useful and handy command to search for files from the command line. It can be used to search for files based on various criterias like permissions, user ownership, modification date/time, size etc. In this post we shall learn to use the find command along with various options that it supports. The examples are broken down into discrete examples making it easy to learn and comprehend. The find command is available on most linux distros by default so you do not have to install any package. This is a command you must master, if you want to get comfortable with your linux system. So lets begin with the command. The basic format of the syntax is like this find where-to-look criteria what-to-look-for Basic examples 1. List all files in current and sub directories This command lists out all the files in the current directory as well as the subdirectories in the current directory. $ find . ./abc.txt ./subdir ./subdir/how.php ./cool.php The command is same as the following $ find . $ find . -print 2. Search specific directory or path The following command will look for files in the test directory in the current directory. Lists out all files by default. $ find ./test ./test ./test/abc.txt ./test/subdir ./test/subdir/how.php ./test/cool.php The following command searches for files by their name. $ find ./test -name abc.txt ./test/abc.txt We can also use wildcards $ find ./test -name *.php ./test/subdir/how.php ./test/cool.php Note that all sub directories are searched recursively. So this is a very powerful way to find all files of a given extension. Trying to search the "/" directory which is the root, would search the entire file system including mounted devices and network storage devices. So be careful. Of course you can press Ctrl + c anytime to stop the command. Ignore the case It is often useful to ignore the case when searching for file names. To ignore the case, just use the "iname" option instead of the "name" option. $ find ./test -iname *.Php ./test/subdir/how.php ./test/cool.php 3. Limit depth of directory traversal The find command by default travels down the entire directory tree recursively, which is time and resource consuming. However the depth of directory travesal can be specified. For example we don't want to go more than 2 or 3 levels down in the sub directories. This is done using the maxdepth option. $ find ./test -maxdepth 2 -name *.php ./test/subdir/how.php ./test/cool.php $ find ./test -maxdepth 1 -name *.php ./test/cool.php The second example uses maxdepth of 1, which means it will not go lower than 1 level deep, either only in the current directory. This is very useful when we want to do a limited search only in the current directory or max 1 level deep sub directories and not the entire directory tree which would take more time. Just like maxdepth there is an option called mindepth which does what the name suggests, that is, it will go atleast N...
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Reviewing Kali Linux – The Distro for Security Geeks

An introduction to Kali Linux - the distro for security geeks

When it comes to hacking, security, forensics etc, linux is the only and the preferred tool. Linux is very hacker friendly from ground up. But still there are distros that are more oriented towards assisting hackers. To name a few, backtrack, backbox, blackbuntu etc.

Backtrack is the most popular distro when it comes to penetration testing and security stuff. And now it has taken a new avatar called Kali Linux. Kali Linux is the new name of backtrack (version 5 rc3 was the last backtrack release).

--

Read more at BinaryTides

 

Starting a Linux Branch in Srilanka

TO WHOM THIS MAY CONCERN


My name is janith kashan and i am a software engneer as well as i have done CCNA (Cisco Cerificate In Network Admistartion) so i want to tell you is me and my group can promot linux OS in sril lanka so if my idea is a good one please let me know you can send me a mail to my e mail 

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

this will be a greate idea i hop so

                THAKYOU!

 

 

How to Turn a PC Into a Linux Web Kiosk

Webconverger in Costa Rica!

Although the PC market is in turmoil, it has never been easier to replace its out-of-date, often unsupported, bloated & infected preinstalled OS with a Linux alternative.

In this tutorial, I'll explain how to turn your PC into a Web kiosk. What's a Web kiosk? It's a PC that directs the public to a certain intended Web application. Imagine public computers found at a library or a cafe, these would be considered Web kiosks.

You might think configuring your favourite desktop operating system to start a browser is easy enough, though the devil is in the details.

  1. Is the system locked down so the user can only get access to the browser?

  2. Does the system have a window manager which can allow a misuse like hiding and minimising the browser?

  3. Does the system prevent downloads in order to save bandwidth?

  4. Is the browser locked down so no malicious addons or configurations can be set?

  5. When a user has finished using the kiosk, is that user's data wiped clean? Is it security reviewed & validated?

  6. Does the kiosk stay upto date with latest security and HTML developments?

  7. Can the kiosk be setup without a URL bar or restricted so the user can't browse sites that have nothing to do with the intended application?

Webconverger is such a Linux kiosk solution that is focused on all these details, delivering Web kiosk software in deployments ranging from retail banks to call centers to community centers.

To try Webconverger out on your PC without touching any existing data, you need 1Gigabyte of RAM and any USB stick you are willing to format.

Download Webconverger and follow the detailed instructions for Windows, Linux or Mac on how to put Webconverger on it upon on a USB memory stick

Once you have the USB stick ready, you need to choose to boot from it in your BIOS menu. Next you should see the Webconverger boot menu and the Live default is just fine.

With any luck, you should now have a Web browser looking back at you. Browse the Web and once you are finished, close the tab to ensure every trace of your session is kept private.

If you install Webconverger, Webconverger will stay uptodate with its unique git upgrade technology. So it's as close as you can get to zero maintenance.

So if you have a place that could use more traffic, set up a PC with Webconverger Web kiosk and turn it into a destination.

 
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