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Linux Desktop Wishlist

Link to this post 23 Apr 09

jdeslip wrote:

[b]Khabi wrote:[/b]
[quote]Direct3D support is actually being worked on in VirtualBox already (I believe it might actually be in the dev repository for it if you feel lucky). From my understanding they're wrapping the Direct3D stuff in OpenGL using a few dll files (I think this is how WINE does it too). So you would just have to install a few dlls in your windows virtual host and off you go.

Its not official, but I'm willing to bet sometime soon it will be in VirtualBox driver install package for your virtual host.

Is this the way VMWare does it? I am worried about robust the mapping of direct3d to opengl is. We all that lots of windows games don't work in wine for example. VMWare's implementation seems pretty robust, though.[/quote]

I actually *think* (I can't find evidence of this however, but its the buzz on the internet) that is how vmware does it.

I can see how its easier. You know what calls OpenGL will make since its an open standard. You write for that, then try to match up rendering functions on the host so you only have on API to code for. I'm sure there will probably be some graphical hiccups because of things D3D supports that OpenGL might not yet, but over time it should work its way out.

Link to this post 27 Apr 09

My Desktop wishlist:
- Less applications requiring runtime environments (Mono, Java...) in default installation
- less redundancy in core components (OSS, Alsa, PulseAudio for example)

Otherwise - I'm using Linux because it has everything I need and it has it out of the box.

Link to this post 13 May 09

IMO, the "desktop experience" is tied very tightly to the distro, which in my case, is usually Fedora and family. As it stands, I have nothing on my list that screams to be fixed or added. I don't watch video or listen to music on Linux, though, so that's probably why. I like the choice of default desktop environment (GNOME), the lack of unnecessary bloat-ware at login, the disabling of eye-candy by default (at least on my "ancient" F8 boxen - which for me is cutting edge), the clean desktop and usually a decent resolution auto-detected. I do wish that changing video/monitor settings was a smoother experience but I know that is partly an xorg issue.

The shakiness of Flash (and, yes, the alternatives) drives me bananas, this is definitely my biggest beef when using Linux as a desktop computer.

Oh, and I wish Fedora would incorporate these into their repos:
TightVNC
TrueCrypt

Link to this post 13 May 09

Very good list ...

Link to this post 14 May 09

Top on my list would be a rewrite of F-Spot in C++, like the rewrite of Tomboy (Gnote). That would mean I could remove mono completely from my system.

Second on my list would be an API that beats OpenGL and the usability of DirectX for things like games. Something that could be common across operating systems, easy to program for and encourage game developers to use for cost and ease of cross platformability (made up word).

Third would be a sorting out sound, maybe through improving pulse audio. Again this could be very multi-platform which benefits Linux from an ease of porting pov.

In no particular order:

I'd like the final 10% of polishing work to be done on desktop apps so that they don't fall over so easily. Which runs into the next point.

I'd like to know whether people want bug reports before I waste my time making them. If I report a bug from a user perspective, without digging into the code I've found it's mostly a waste of time and sometimes it is a waste of time even with a patch at hand.

I'd like Gnome to feel lightweight and responsive on a core duo cpu @ > 2GHz and 2G of RAM. I'd like Gnome to feel lightweight and responsive on 1/4 of that.

I'd like for people I've installed Linux for to be able to go to a website and download a program without knowing what distro they are running, what version of said distro, and whether it's 32 or 64 bit.

I'd like eZoom to have text caret support.

I'd like my Ubuntu system to boot in the time it takes xpud . Then I would feel they could crow about the boot time.

But there is one other thing on my wishlist (for now). I'd like to spend time writing programs and patching stuff for the Linux desktop rather than doing server stuff.

OK it's a highly personal wishlist and I think it lacks some important things that the first post in this thread and subsequent posts have. But there you go.

Link to this post 14 May 09

Top on my list would be a rewrite of F-Spot in C++, like the rewrite of Tomboy (Gnote). That would mean I could remove mono completely from my system.

Yes, that should be the way to go. Less mono and more freedom.

Second on my list would be an API that beats OpenGL and the usability of DirectX for things like games. Something that could be common across operating systems, easy to program for and encourage game developers to use for cost and ease of cross platformability (made up word).

Start developing it, I'd bet OpenGL people is trying their best. You also need to get hardware to recognice yourGL.

I'd like Gnome to feel lightweight and responsive on a core duo cpu @ > 2GHz and 2G of RAM. I'd like Gnome to feel lightweight and responsive on 1/4 of that.

I had a computer with that 1/4 and it ran Gnome really well. I now have a laptop with C2D and 3G ram and Gnome flies. It doesn't use even that 1/4 of ram, so it does not matter if I have 1 or 3GB.

If you are doing heavy compiling, rendering and such at the same time, it's not the fault of Gnome if it does not run well. Anyway, I have gone for Openbox and I'm looking for ways to go lighter with command-line tools. You want a lighter system? Build it or choose one. It helps nothing to whine that "I want this and I want that" when you do not bring anything new to the conversation.

I'd like for people I've installed Linux for to be able to go to a website and download a program without knowing what distro they are running, what version of said distro, and whether it's 32 or 64 bit.

No you don't, you want them to "sudo apt-get install whatever" or to use the lovely add/remove program thingy. They should not install everything they find from the internet. That's what repositories are for.

But there is one other thing on my wishlist (for now). I'd like to spend time writing programs and patching stuff for the Linux desktop rather than doing server stuff.

Yay! If you have things you'd like to change, just do it. It's good to scratch your personal itches first. I have some things I'd like to do and I'm actively learning how.

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