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Whats the best OS for us

Link to this post 01 Jun 10

Please see eBay to max out your RAM (probably PC133, needing 2X256), then go to http://linux.softpedia.com/progDownload/MEPIS-AntiX-Download-27857.html and download.

This Linux distro is amazing on lod machines and with access to Debian and sidux (and other) repositories, you will hav no trouble upgrading software, including OpenOffice. You will definitely need the most RAM your motherboard will support, however.

To find this out, go to SystemRescueCD (http://sourceforge.net/projects/systemrescuecd/files/) and download version 1.3.4.
It is a LiveCD and has a utility that tells one all that is needed about Hardware used.

Best wishes and my the Creator bless your efforts!

Link to this post 02 Jun 10

I agree with GoinEasy9, Ubuntu is the easiest to install on any computer, even with the latest hardware. Mint, is another flavor of Ubuntu with a flashy GUI that they've modified while Ubuntu keeps theirs simple.

Also, Ubuntu uses the SUDO option (rootless) commands to prevent hackers from attempting to break in the system. root is present but deactivated. Never reactivate it.

Link to this post 02 Jun 10

Maarek Stele wrote:

Also, Ubuntu uses the SUDO option (rootless) commands to prevent hackers from attempting to break in the system. root is present but deactivated. Never reactivate it.[/quote]

Why so?

Link to this post 02 Jun 10

marc wrote:

[b]Maarek Stele wrote:[/b]

Also, Ubuntu uses the SUDO option (rootless) commands to prevent hackers from attempting to break in the system. root is present but deactivated. Never reactivate it.

Why so?[/quote]
First reason as I've seen online and from my server logs, root is the primary account automated scripts try to break in through. Before adding additional security measures to block these scripts and free up bandwidth, my server logs were in the 10s of thousands with these types of hits. Sure I'm using SSH which Greatly slows down the automation of the attack, but the whole findings end up annoying, I would trace hits from Guatemala, China, Russia, Middle East, and even parts of the US. And that's about it. Nothing more I can do in return without repercussions.

The Second part of not activating the root user is simple. If you want to be in the command line as "the" admin, just type su. you'll be at a # sign after the password and you won't need the sudo option for the server maintenance you are preforming.

Link to this post 02 Jun 10

I differ in my opinion, sudo represents a potential issue by allowing attackers to potentially access root rights from a standard user account, which may have a weak password. I think it is better practice to keep the root account, remove sudo rights except for specific actions and secure root with a difficult password. As for ssh that should be restricted to not allow root login and limit retries or only allow root ssh access via a key file.

Link to this post 02 Jun 10

Good tips, moderator! I believe I had what you refer to happen to me. As such, should one goes with any ubuntu flavor to access the web, I would recomment immediately installing Bastille along with it.

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