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Learning linux severs: Red Hat or Centos ?

Link to this post 26 Apr 11

Hi there, I have a question, please. I'm new to linux and I'm learning with unix academy training DVDs. The training comes bundled with many Linux distros, and I initially installed and been using Ubuntu for my lessons (it was a random choice). I do have IT experience, but not with Linux (databases, app servers, win admin). I know that Red Hat is most widely used, when it comes to large scale enterprise installations.
Now I'm stuck in a confusion: is CentOS really the same as Red Hat, and could it be used for training for Red Hat? Are these two absolutely identical?

Link to this post 26 Apr 11

The short answer is "yes". My understanding of CentOS is, they ripped out everything proprietary from Red Hat (logos, etc.) and rebuilt the packages from the source RPMS (that Red Hat is obliged to provide).

I can tell you that I support Red Hat EL servers at my work and we use CentOS all the time for our development servers and workstations, when we can get away with it (i.e. when customer does not require RHEL) b/c we have never once run into an issue using it instead of RHEL. For example, every piece of code that we write (and package as an RPM) we can install onto a CentOS box and it works perfectly. Similarly, we can take any package that was built for a RHEL system (either binary or rebuilt from SRPM, if we feel like doing the extra work - but usually is not necessary) and install it on CentOS again, with no compatibility problems whatsoever.

Plus, it is a great way to have a RHEL server at home for you to play with, and not have to worry about the license.

-bill

Link to this post 26 Apr 11

atreyu wrote:

The short answer is "yes". My understanding of CentOS is, they ripped out everything proprietary from Red Hat (logos, etc.) and rebuilt the packages from the source RPMS (that Red Hat is obliged to provide).

I can tell you that I support Red Hat EL servers at my work and we use CentOS all the time for our development servers and workstations, when we can get away with it (i.e. when customer does not require RHEL) b/c we have never once run into an issue using it instead of RHEL. For example, every piece of code that we write (and package as an RPM) we can install onto a CentOS box and it works perfectly. Similarly, we can take any package that was built for a RHEL system (either binary or rebuilt from SRPM, if we feel like doing the extra work - but usually is not necessary) and install it on CentOS again, with no compatibility problems whatsoever.

Plus, it is a great way to have a RHEL server at home for you to play with, and not have to worry about the license.

-bill


+1 CentOS is definitely is a free version of Red Hat Fedora.

Link to this post 26 Apr 11

brunewarren wrote:

Hi there, I have a question, please. I'm new to linux and I'm learning with unix academy training DVDs. The training comes bundled with many Linux distros, and I initially installed and been using Ubuntu for my lessons (it was a random choice). I do have IT experience, but not with Linux (databases, app servers, win admin). I know that Red Hat is most widely used, when it comes to large scale enterprise installations.
Now I'm stuck in a confusion: is CentOS really the same as Red Hat, and could it be used for training for Red Hat? Are these two absolutely identical?

They are not identical but are 100% binary compatible.

Centos rebuilds the sources packages from Red Hat free from any copyrighted material and that's it :)

You can perfectly use CentOs to learn RedHat systems management (although some commands may change names)

I would also suggest giving a try to Scientific Linux :)

Regards

Link to this post 28 Apr 11

All right, so for all my training purposes I can use CentOS.

Link to this post 29 Apr 11

brunewarren wrote:

All right, so for all my training purposes I can use CentOS.

Nice chosing :)

My server runs centos as well as the work servers. It's a very good server OS and amazing for learning purposes as you can use Red Hat's documentation (docs.redhat.com)

Regards

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