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Lightweight/fast/stable distro which supports high-end machines?

Link to this post 05 Aug 12

What is a recommended distro which would support any (large) amount of RAM, best CPU etc.?

Is it possible to run the Kernel without a distro? If so, would that be a good solution, and how would one go about installing and running just the Kernel.?

Would be even better if it could be booted off a disc and stored in RAM..

I don't need any pre-installed apps, or fancy UI..

Thanks for your help :-)

Link to this post 09 Aug 12

Linux is the best choice to support any amount of RAM, CPU etc, but distro may vary one to one.
Technically can install just a bootloader and the kernel alone, but as soon as the kernel boots, it complains about not being able to start "init", then it just sits there and u can't do anything with it. It is part of bootloader that is in the MBR. The kernel sits somewhere on the regular area of a disk. The bootloader is configured to know where that is, so it can load the kernel and execute it. LFS / Minix have a good idea to figure out how to build a minimum system. U can also navigate Linux From Scratch: www.linuxfromscratch.org/

Link to this post 14 Aug 12

lynx said:

What is a recommended distro which would support any (large) amount of RAM, best CPU etc.?

Is it possible to run the Kernel without a distro? If so, would that be a good solution, and how would one go about installing and running just the Kernel.?

Would be even better if it could be booted off a disc and stored in RAM..

I don't need any pre-installed apps, or fancy UI..

Thanks for your help :-)

Any linux distro can support any amount of ran and most CPUs. It really depends on your intended use with the system.

The Kernel is the program that runs your physical computer. It does nothing unless it is given a command from the user which is via programs. Mostly a kernel based system is used in recovery mode. A distro is a Kernel supplied with a few programs or a DE.

If you want to run a linux distro from disk, use a LiveCD of the distro of choice.

Link to this post 12 Jan

Im using bodhi atm, very fast

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