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Kernel 2.6.35.10?

Link to this post 17 Jan 11

It's been a while (weeks) that I've been getting this response from finger @ftp.kernel.org:
The latest linux-next version of the Linux kernel is: next-20110115
The latest snapshot 2.6 version of the Linux kernel is: 2.6.37-git14
The latest mainline 2.6 version of the Linux kernel is: 2.6.37
The latest stable 2.6 version of the Linux kernel is: 2.6.37
The latest stable 2.6.36 version of the Linux kernel is: 2.6.36.3
The latest longterm 2.6.35 version of the Linux kernel is: 2.6.35.10
The latest stable 2.6.35 version of the Linux kernel is: 2.6.35.9
The latest longterm 2.6.34 version of the Linux kernel is: 2.6.34.8
The latest stable 2.6.34 version of the Linux kernel is: 2.6.34.7
The latest stable 2.6.33 version of the Linux kernel is: 2.6.33.7
The latest longterm 2.6.32 version of the Linux kernel is: 2.6.32.28
The latest stable 2.6.32 version of the Linux kernel is: 2.6.32.28
The latest longterm 2.6.27 version of the Linux kernel is: 2.6.27.57
The latest stable 2.6.27 version of the Linux kernel is: 2.6.27.57
The latest stable 2.4.37 version of the Linux kernel is: 2.4.37.11

However, in ftp.kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/v2.6 (I also tried some mirror) I cannot find any file *2.6.35.10*.
Can anyone please explain me why?

Link to this post 17 Jan 11

I think I'm slowly getting it. I thought it had to do with the latest longterm tag, but of the four such tagged kernels I could not find three (i.e. kernels 2.6.32.28, 2.6.34.8 and 2.6.35.10) but I could find version 2.6.27.57. But now I see kernel 2.6.27.57 is also tagged latest stable, so I guess it's normal that latest longterm kernels that are not yet declared stable are not in the official repository. Is then the non-stable "latest longterm" kernel a kernel due to be released in the future?

Link to this post 17 Jan 11

It does get confusing. Maybe this link will help.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linux_kernel?wasRedirected=true

Link to this post 17 Jan 11

Thank you.
Yet, I did get confused: reading https://lkml.org/lkml/2010/12/2/388 it appears Greg KH changed his mind little time after introducing the longterm kernels, faced with the big task of maintaining several versions of the stable kernel. All right, I'll just keep in mind that the definition (and maybe the existence) of "stable longterm" kernels is fluid.

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