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Istimsak Abdulbasir

Istimsak Abdulbasir

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  • Member Since: 05 Jan 10
  • Last Logged In: 2 days ago

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  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: Linux version best for Mobile App server
    [quote="Kaveek"]Greetings I am very new to Linux and would like to know the following: a. Which Linux version will work best as a server for a Mobile App sitting in the cloud and why so? b. I have been advised to utilize MongoDB as it is open source as well and easily expandable. In your opinion was this a wise decision? Any advise or tips would be highly appreciated. Regards, Kaveek[/quote] When you say server for a mobile app, did you envision a server hosting the mobile app and will allows others to download the app directly from the server? Or, the server will data collected by the mobile app? This is an interesting question and I would like to learn more about it.
    Link to this post 2 days ago

    Kaveek said:

    Greetings

    I am very new to Linux and would like to know the following:

    a. Which Linux version will work best as a server for a Mobile App sitting in the cloud and why so?

    b. I have been advised to utilize MongoDB as it is open source as well and easily expandable. In your opinion was this a wise decision?

    Any advise or tips would be highly appreciated.

    Regards,
    Kaveek

    When you say server for a mobile app, did you envision a server hosting the mobile app and will allows others to download the app directly from the server? Or, the server will data collected by the mobile app? This is an interesting question and I would like to learn more about it.

  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: Linux version best for Mobile App server
    [quote="Akdom"]Hi Kaveek, I'm no big expert, but I would suggest you CentOS or Debian since they are pretty good for a server. Look them up on the internet. They are both kind-of lightweight, intuitive and easy to use. And they both have a great community and are still maintained on regular basis. Both OS are widely used, so you won't hit a wall if you have a problem and most of VPS provider offer them along other OS flavour. Debian is also concervative in their packages version, so you won't get all the latest cool and amazing features for each of your packages, but you are sure they will work and they are (almost :) ) flawless. I personally use Debian on all my servers. You may want to ask more specific questions to the ServerFault awesome community concerning server-specific questions if you need help to set up your server (they won't do it for you but they can guide you). Concerning MangoDB, I tried MangoDB for a week or so, but I personally prefer MariaDB with the TokuDB engine. It is open source, it is an active project, it is way better than MySQL in many ways, and it's fast (with some tweaks, it can fly!). TokuDB offer on-the-fly compression (among many other benefits) which I looooove. Those are just quick tips, you may want to look on those respective websites or search more information about them on the internet. [/quote] Don't forget to also give the user links to the sites that you are suggesting. The sites you have in mind might work but without links, the user could get lost.
    Link to this post 2 days ago

    Akdom said:

    Hi Kaveek,

    I'm no big expert, but I would suggest you CentOS or Debian since they are pretty good for a server. Look them up on the internet. They are both kind-of lightweight, intuitive and easy to use. And they both have a great community and are still maintained on regular basis. Both OS are widely used, so you won't hit a wall if you have a problem and most of VPS provider offer them along other OS flavour. Debian is also concervative in their packages version, so you won't get all the latest cool and amazing features for each of your packages, but you are sure they will work and they are (almost :) ) flawless.

    I personally use Debian on all my servers.

    You may want to ask more specific questions to the ServerFault awesome community concerning server-specific questions if you need help to set up your server (they won't do it for you but they can guide you).

    Concerning MangoDB, I tried MangoDB for a week or so, but I personally prefer MariaDB with the TokuDB engine. It is open source, it is an active project, it is way better than MySQL in many ways, and it's fast (with some tweaks, it can fly!). TokuDB offer on-the-fly compression (among many other benefits) which I looooove.

    Those are just quick tips, you may want to look on those respective websites or search more information about them on the internet.


    Don't forget to also give the user links to the sites that you are suggesting. The sites you have in mind might work but without links, the user could get lost.

  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: Changing the OS to make a new one?
    [quote="Zethnos"]Hey guys. For some time now I have had (what I think are) a few great ideas for my own OS. I asked some of my friends that do computer programing if they could help me, but they all said that it is too much work that I should just look at linux. I took their advice and did some googling and found out I can take linux and make my own OS from it. I have a problem though. I am not a computer programer by any means. I am a graphic designer. My coding knowledge is limited to HTML and CSS coding for websites and such. I mean I can probably sit down and try to learn programing code in my free time, but that would take a long long time, and I am not looking to going back to school for it because I am scared I would just end up failing the classes. (I am 19 years old by the way.) Do any of you know where I might be able to find someone willing to help me as just a side project? or is there maybe some software that can do code editing and I just tell the program what I want the OS to do? Most of my ideas are User Interface based. I can do all of the graphics and everything for the OS I just need help with coding it to do things. I was also thinking I might want to do a tablet or phone OS to start with if it would be easier to make. I don't really know anything about linux or where to start, I was just told it would be best to start here instead of making one from scratch. Can you guys recommend any youtube videos that can teach me all about the OS itself and what all it can/can't do? I heard that it has a lot of short comings compaired to other operating systems. or is it just as good as windows and apple? Sorry about the long post and all the questions, I am just really interested in having my own OS and using linux to help. One last thing, is there a way to code it so I can run Windows programs without using WINE or Crossover? Thank you for reading and for any advice you can give me![/quote] Before you pursue creating your own OS, there are some things to consider 1) Do you see a problem that this new OS will fix? 2) Can you allocate the required time needed to learn its programming structure? 3) Is there another Linux distro that functions towards your liking? 4) Can you build and manage your own packages and can you get help when needed? 5) what package format will you be using and what package management program will be in place (very important) 6) Would it be better to contribute to a current GNU/Linux project and negotiate your changes there? Definitely research question 1. You don't want to recreate an already ongoing project and start a project that does not have a market. Share your ideas first with other linux users and developers. Their feedback will tell you if you have something. Because you are not familiar with linux, first step will be to learn it. Put it on a desktop,or server, and hack it. Learn as much as you can. Linux is good for development but may not be good for you. First learn to drive the car before learning how to fix it. You must also be willing to learn a lot of programming. Creating a new OS is no easy task. If you are not sure about your abilities, then you will stop before you get started. Here is a good site that gives an overview about forking a Linux OS. [url=http://www.fotiskoutoulakis.com/distro-forking-101/]http://www.fotiskoutoulakis.com/distro-forking-101/[/url] This will give you an idea of is required to perform this process. Then browse this site to start learning linux. [url=http://www.linux.com/learn/new-user-guides]http://www.linux.com/learn/new-user-guides[/url] You can also have a look at this site to get you started. [url=http://www.tldp.org/LDP/sag/html/index.html]http://www.tldp.org/LDP/sag/html/index.html[/url]
    Link to this post 2 days ago

    Zethnos said:

    Hey guys. For some time now I have had (what I think are) a few great ideas for my own OS. I asked some of my friends that do computer programing if they could help me, but they all said that it is too much work that I should just look at linux. I took their advice and did some googling and found out I can take linux and make my own OS from it.

    I have a problem though. I am not a computer programer by any means. I am a graphic designer. My coding knowledge is limited to HTML and CSS coding for websites and such. I mean I can probably sit down and try to learn programing code in my free time, but that would take a long long time, and I am not looking to going back to school for it because I am scared I would just end up failing the classes. (I am 19 years old by the way.)

    Do any of you know where I might be able to find someone willing to help me as just a side project? or is there maybe some software that can do code editing and I just tell the program what I want the OS to do? Most of my ideas are User Interface based. I can do all of the graphics and everything for the OS I just need help with coding it to do things.

    I was also thinking I might want to do a tablet or phone OS to start with if it would be easier to make. I don't really know anything about linux or where to start, I was just told it would be best to start here instead of making one from scratch. Can you guys recommend any youtube videos that can teach me all about the OS itself and what all it can/can't do? I heard that it has a lot of short comings compaired to other operating systems. or is it just as good as windows and apple?

    Sorry about the long post and all the questions, I am just really interested in having my own OS and using linux to help. One last thing, is there a way to code it so I can run Windows programs without using WINE or Crossover?

    Thank you for reading and for any advice you can give me!


    Before you pursue creating your own OS, there are some things to consider
    1) Do you see a problem that this new OS will fix?
    2) Can you allocate the required time needed to learn its programming structure?
    3) Is there another Linux distro that functions towards your liking?
    4) Can you build and manage your own packages and can you get help when needed?
    5) what package format will you be using and what package management program will be in place (very important)
    6) Would it be better to contribute to a current GNU/Linux project and negotiate your changes there?

    Definitely research question 1. You don't want to recreate an already ongoing project and start a project that does not have a market. Share your ideas first with other linux users and developers. Their feedback will tell you if you have something.

    Because you are not familiar with linux, first step will be to learn it. Put it on a desktop,or server, and hack it. Learn as much as you can. Linux is good for development but may not be good for you. First learn to drive the car before learning how to fix it.

    You must also be willing to learn a lot of programming. Creating a new OS is no easy task. If you are not sure about your abilities, then you will stop before you get started.

    Here is a good site that gives an overview about forking a Linux OS.
    http://www.fotiskoutoulakis.com/distro-forking-101/

    This will give you an idea of is required to perform this process.

    Then browse this site to start learning linux.
    http://www.linux.com/learn/new-user-guides

    You can also have a look at this site to get you started.

    http://www.tldp.org/LDP/sag/html/index.html

  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: Youtube instantly crashes my system. Mint 17 / Cinnamon with Chromium.
    You might want to read this post as well. [url=https://support.google.com/chrome/answer/108086?hl=en]https://support.google.com/chrome/answer/108086?hl=en[/url]
    Link to this post 3 days ago

    You might want to read this post as well.

    https://support.google.com/chrome/answer/108086?hl=en

  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: Youtube instantly crashes my system. Mint 17 / Cinnamon with Chromium.
    [quote="Guiphil"]No flashplugins in Chrome/plugins. I read that I had to do sudo apt-get install pepperflashplugin-nonfree or sudo dpkg-reconfigure pepperflashplugin-nonfree but these commands don't do anything. I searched but ran out of solutions.[/quote] The title of this post indicates that you are using the chromium browser. You can view flash content in this browser if you use the pepperflashplugin that adobe developed that the google-chrome browser now uses. I have read that in order for chromium to use pepper flash, the plugin must be extracted form google chrome [url=http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2014/01/chromium-npapi-flash-dropped-april-2014]http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2014/01/chromium-npapi-flash-dropped-april-2014[/url]. I also read that you can install pepperflash from ubuntu's trusty repositories [url=http://askubuntu.com/questions/449103/chromium-34-and-later-cannot-detect-flash-plugin]http://askubuntu.com/questions/449103/chromium-34-and-later-cannot-detect-flash-plugin[/url] You are using mint 17 which is based on ubuntu 14.04 trusty. They are both using the same repositories. What you can install on ubuntu you can install on mint, mostly. I am using google chrome on my mint 17 system which comes with flash enabled. I installed chromium and installed pepperflash by downloading it from my system's repositories #sudo apt-get install pepperflashplugin-nonfree To check that pepperflash was enabled in chromium, in the address bar, type chrome:plugins. Pepperflash was not enabled by default. After I clicked allow always, I was able to view youtube videos. Check to make sure chromium is using pepperflash by following the instructions in the above links. You can always stick with firefox.
    Link to this post 3 days ago

    Guiphil said:

    No flashplugins in Chrome/plugins.
    I read that I had to do sudo apt-get install pepperflashplugin-nonfree
    or
    sudo dpkg-reconfigure pepperflashplugin-nonfree
    but these commands don't do anything.

    I searched but ran out of solutions.

    The title of this post indicates that you are using the chromium browser. You can view flash content in this browser if you use the pepperflashplugin that adobe developed that the google-chrome browser now uses.

    I have read that in order for chromium to use pepper flash, the plugin must be extracted form google chrome http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2014/01/chromium-npapi-flash-dropped-april-2014.

    I also read that you can install pepperflash from ubuntu's trusty repositories http://askubuntu.com/questions/449103/chromium-34-and-later-cannot-detect-flash-plugin

    You are using mint 17 which is based on ubuntu 14.04 trusty. They are both using the same repositories. What you can install on ubuntu you can install on mint, mostly.

    I am using google chrome on my mint 17 system which comes with flash enabled. I installed chromium and installed pepperflash by downloading it from my system's repositories

    #sudo apt-get install pepperflashplugin-nonfree

    To check that pepperflash was enabled in chromium, in the address bar, type chrome:plugins. Pepperflash was not enabled by default. After I clicked allow always, I was able to view youtube videos.

    Check to make sure chromium is using pepperflash by following the instructions in the above links. You can always stick with firefox.

  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: Dual Boot of Windows 7 and Linux (Debian 7 or Centos 7)
    As for booting windows and Ubuntu on a UEFI system, I found some articles that not only teaches you what UEFI is and why it was developed but also how to dualboot windows and linux on such a system. There a few steps you have to take. Take your time and read it. UEFI is the new computer bios that boots up your computer and hands over the remaining boot process your operating system. Your operating system must be able to communicate with the new UEFI or EFI. Using an OS that is not UEFI compatible, one must disable UEFI or Secure Boot. If you have an OS installed under UEFI, you have to use UEFI. None UEFI systems must be installed using legacy bios. That means you have to manually enable and disable UEFI from your system's bios to boot your system. That may be the reason whay you were not seeing windows and ubuntu under the same boot menu. If you are going to use UEFI, then both OSes must be install using UEFI. [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unified_Extensible_Firmware_Interface]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unified_Extensible_Firmware_Interface[/url] [url=http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh824898.aspx]http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh824898.aspx[/url] [url=https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Installation/UEFI-and-BIOS]https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Installation/UEFI-and-BIOS[/url] I would suggest you image your harddrive just in case something major goes wrong. You can always reverse the issue. Some programs that will help with disk imaging using linux. [url=http://www.cyberciti.biz/open-source/linux-based-disk-cloning-imaging-software/]http://www.cyberciti.biz/open-source/linux-based-disk-cloning-imaging-software/[/url] For imaging and backup using windows, have a look at this site. [url=http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/4241/how-to-create-a-system-image-in-windows-7/]http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/4241/how-to-create-a-system-image-in-windows-7/[/url] hope this helps.
    Link to this post 4 days ago

    As for booting windows and Ubuntu on a UEFI system, I found some articles that not only teaches you what UEFI is and why it was developed but also how to dualboot windows and linux on such a system. There a few steps you have to take. Take your time and read it.

    UEFI is the new computer bios that boots up your computer and hands over the remaining boot process your operating system. Your operating system must be able to communicate with the new UEFI or EFI. Using an OS that is not UEFI compatible, one must disable UEFI or Secure Boot.

    If you have an OS installed under UEFI, you have to use UEFI. None UEFI systems must be installed using legacy bios. That means you have to manually enable and disable UEFI from your system's bios to boot your system.

    That may be the reason whay you were not seeing windows and ubuntu under the same boot menu. If you are going to use UEFI, then both OSes must be install using UEFI.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unified_Extensible_Firmware_Interface

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh824898.aspx

    https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Installation/UEFI-and-BIOS

    I would suggest you image your harddrive just in case something major goes wrong. You can always reverse the issue.

    Some programs that will help with disk imaging using linux.

    http://www.cyberciti.biz/open-source/linux-based-disk-cloning-imaging-software/

    For imaging and backup using windows, have a look at this site.

    http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/4241/how-to-create-a-system-image-in-windows-7/

    hope this helps.

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