Linux.com

Istimsak Abdulbasir

Istimsak Abdulbasir

  • Moderator
  • Posts: 509
  • Member Since: 05 Jan 10
  • Last Logged In: 59 minutes ago

Latest Posts

Posted by
Topic
Post Preview
Posted
  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: Dual Boot of Windows 7 and Linux (Debian 7 or Centos 7)
    Is boot.cfg part of the CentOS system? If so, can you print out the contents of that file. We may need to add an entry for the other OS. Here is how one of my systems are listed in grub.cfg from Linuxmint 17: [code]menuentry 'Linux Mint 17 Xfce 32-bit, 3.13.0-24-generic (/dev/sda2)' --class ubuntu --class gnu-linux --class gnu --class os { recordfail gfxmode $linux_gfx_mode insmod gzio insmod part_gpt insmod ext2 set root='hd0,gpt2' if [ x$feature_platform_search_hint = xy ]; then search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root --hint-bios=hd0,gpt2 --hint-efi=hd0,gpt2 --hint-baremetal=ahci0,gpt2 7ed92cda-ecbc-4415-b074-feb509662efc else search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root 7ed92cda-ecbc-4415-b074-feb509662efc fi linux /boot/vmlinuz-3.13.0-24-generic root=UUID=7ed92cda-ecbc-4415-b074-feb509662efc ro quiet splash $vt_handoff initrd /boot/initrd.img-3.13.0-24-generic[/code] By the way, is there a boot.cfg in one of those /bootefi folders?
    Link to this post 04 Dec

    Is boot.cfg part of the CentOS system? If so, can you print out the contents of that file. We may need to add an entry for the other OS.

    Here is how one of my systems are listed in grub.cfg from Linuxmint 17:

    menuentry 'Linux Mint 17 Xfce 32-bit, 3.13.0-24-generic (/dev/sda2)' --class ubuntu --class gnu-linux --class gnu --class os {
    recordfail
    gfxmode $linux_gfx_mode
    insmod gzio
    insmod part_gpt
    insmod ext2
    set root='hd0,gpt2'
    if [ x$feature_platform_search_hint = xy ]; then
    search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root --hint-bios=hd0,gpt2 --hint-efi=hd0,gpt2 --hint-baremetal=ahci0,gpt2 7ed92cda-ecbc-4415-b074-feb509662efc
    else
    search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root 7ed92cda-ecbc-4415-b074-feb509662efc
    fi
    linux /boot/vmlinuz-3.13.0-24-generic root=UUID=7ed92cda-ecbc-4415-b074-feb509662efc ro quiet splash $vt_handoff
    initrd /boot/initrd.img-3.13.0-24-generic

    By the way, is there a boot.cfg in one of those /bootefi folders?

  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: Bootable DVD and Switchign to Linux Help
    [quote="Nerafim"]Hmm, well thanks a lot for the advice, bootneck. I'll look into Zorin. Honestly I haven't looked up more about Linux but I remember now that it's supposed to be script based commands, so if this one is streamlined like that then it sounds like it is for me. I would still like to know more about these stuff however and explore my options. And how do I burn the DVD? Honestly I am kind of disappointed at the amount of feedback I got on this. It's supposed to be the Linux main community/center thing even. ;/[/quote] When dealing with computers, nothing is ever solved in one sentence. If so, it was not thought all the way through. That is the nature of technology. Here is the link to zorinOS, [url=http://zorin-os.com/index.html]http://zorin-os.com/index.html[/url] [url=http://www.linux.com/directory/Distributions/desktop/zorin-os]http://www.linux.com/directory/Distributions/desktop/zorin-os[/url] You can create a linux boot disk in two ways; use startup-disk-creator, https://apps.ubuntu.com/cat/applications/usb-creator-gtk/ in ubuntu, or download netbootin http://unetbootin.sourceforge.net/. It is impossible to explain what every 230 linux distros are useful for. We can suggest based on what we use. You have to be clear on what you want your linux system to do. That narrows down the search and we can direct you to the right place. No question or answer is open-ended. We engage with the users. [code] apt-get install linux!![/code]
    Link to this post 03 Dec

    Nerafim said:

    Hmm, well thanks a lot for the advice, bootneck. I'll look into Zorin. Honestly I haven't looked up more about Linux but I remember now that it's supposed to be script based commands, so if this one is streamlined like that then it sounds like it is for me. I would still like to know more about these stuff however and explore my options. And how do I burn the DVD?

    Honestly I am kind of disappointed at the amount of feedback I got on this. It's supposed to be the Linux main community/center thing even. ;/

    When dealing with computers, nothing is ever solved in one sentence. If so, it was not thought all the way through. That is the nature of technology.

    Here is the link to zorinOS,
    http://zorin-os.com/index.html

    http://www.linux.com/directory/Distributions/desktop/zorin-os

    You can create a linux boot disk in two ways; use startup-disk-creator, https://apps.ubuntu.com/cat/applications/usb-creator-gtk/ in ubuntu, or download netbootin http://unetbootin.sourceforge.net/.

    It is impossible to explain what every 230 linux distros are useful for. We can suggest based on what we use. You have to be clear on what you want your linux system to do. That narrows down the search and we can direct you to the right place.

    No question or answer is open-ended. We engage with the users.

     apt-get install linux!!

  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: Changing the OS to make a new one?
    Another thing I want you to look at it Arch Linux: [url=http://www.linux.com/directory/Distributions/desktop/arch-linux]http://www.linux.com/directory/Distributions/desktop/arch-linux[/url] This system was deigned for linux users who want to learn how a linux system is built and works from the ground up. It shows you everything. Step by step, you are shown how linux is installed on a computer, what happens in the background during installation; booting from bios to mbr, to bootloader to boot partition; packages included with the system and what additional packages that can be added if using internet services; how to configure your system using the command line and text files; how to install packages once the system has been install either through a package manager or using source code. This will be a great place to learn forking. Combine the lessons learned from arch to debian and linuxmint, you will become a formidable master of your systems.
    Link to this post 01 Dec

    Another thing I want you to look at it Arch Linux:

    http://www.linux.com/directory/Distributions/desktop/arch-linux

    This system was deigned for linux users who want to learn how a linux system is built and works from the ground up. It shows you everything. Step by step, you are shown how linux is installed on a computer, what happens in the background during installation; booting from bios to mbr, to bootloader to boot partition; packages included with the system and what additional packages that can be added if using internet services; how to configure your system using the command line and text files; how to install packages once the system has been install either through a package manager or using source code.

    This will be a great place to learn forking.

    Combine the lessons learned from arch to debian and linuxmint, you will become a formidable master of your systems.

  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: Changing the OS to make a new one?
    [quote="Zethnos"]Cool thanks. I will check them out in a bit and see what they are like. I'll post back here when I decide. I can't seem to get my PMs to work on here.[/quote] What do you mean "PMs". I want to be clear so I am not making the wrong assumptions.
    Link to this post 01 Dec

    Zethnos said:

    Cool thanks. I will check them out in a bit and see what they are like. I'll post back here when I decide. I can't seem to get my PMs to work on here.

    What do you mean "PMs". I want to be clear so I am not making the wrong assumptions.

  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: Changing the OS to make a new one?
    Haha, sorry. As a new user to linux, a recommend using something that mimics windows a bit. Start with Linuxmint the Xfce edition. It is light weight, allows you to install and remove programs easily using GUI tools, has codecs that allows you to play music, videos and interact with media on the web. It is backed by a great community who's mission is to create a true desktop linux OS. It is based on ubuntu and uses the same repositories, archive of programs that ubuntu downloads its packages from. It can use the latest open source and closed source programs. It has a beautiful visual expression. You will feel right at home with it. You don't need to do any heavy programming, configuration, or hacking. Linuxmint is Linux done for you. All you have to do, is boot and enjoy. [url=http://www.linuxmint.com/release.php?id=22]http://www.linuxmint.com/release.php?id=22[/url] Then when it is time to move on to something more advanced, try debian 7.7. [url=https://www.debian.org/distrib/]https://www.debian.org/distrib/[/url] Of course I am suggesting what I use. You don't have to pick them. There are hundreds of Linux distros. They all have a target audience. I cannot and will not learn all 230 Linux distros. I have picked what works for me and that is what I will stick with. If you take my route, I will be with you every step of the way.
    Link to this post 01 Dec

    Haha, sorry.

    As a new user to linux, a recommend using something that mimics windows a bit. Start with Linuxmint the Xfce edition. It is light weight, allows you to install and remove programs easily using GUI tools, has codecs that allows you to play music, videos and interact with media on the web. It is backed by a great community who's mission is to create a true desktop linux OS. It is based on ubuntu and uses the same repositories, archive of programs that ubuntu downloads its packages from. It can use the latest open source and closed source programs. It has a beautiful visual expression. You will feel right at home with it. You don't need to do any heavy programming, configuration, or hacking. Linuxmint is Linux done for you. All you have to do, is boot and enjoy.

    http://www.linuxmint.com/release.php?id=22


    Then when it is time to move on to something more advanced, try debian 7.7.

    https://www.debian.org/distrib/

    Of course I am suggesting what I use. You don't have to pick them. There are hundreds of Linux distros. They all have a target audience. I cannot and will not learn all 230 Linux distros. I have picked what works for me and that is what I will stick with. If you take my route, I will be with you every step of the way.

  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: Changing the OS to make a new one?
    Use the latest VM version 4.3.20 for windows. [url=https://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads]https://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads[/url]
    Link to this post 30 Nov

    Use the latest VM version 4.3.20 for windows.

    https://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads

Who we are ?

The Linux Foundation is a non-profit consortium dedicated to the growth of Linux.

More About the foundation...

Frequent Questions

Join / Linux Training / Board