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Istimsak Abdulbasir

Istimsak Abdulbasir

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  • Member Since: 05 Jan 10
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  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: Changing the OS to make a new one?
    Another thing I want you to look at it Arch Linux: [url=http://www.linux.com/directory/Distributions/desktop/arch-linux]http://www.linux.com/directory/Distributions/desktop/arch-linux[/url] This system was deigned for linux users who want to learn how a linux system is built and works from the ground up. It shows you everything. Step by step, you are shown how linux is installed on a computer, what happens in the background during installation; booting from bios to mbr, to bootloader to boot partition; packages included with the system and what additional packages that can be added if using internet services; how to configure your system using the command line and text files; how to install packages once the system has been install either through a package manager or using source code. This will be a great place to learn forking. Combine the lessons learned from arch to debian and linuxmint, you will become a formidable master of your systems.
    Link to this post 01 Dec

    Another thing I want you to look at it Arch Linux:

    http://www.linux.com/directory/Distributions/desktop/arch-linux

    This system was deigned for linux users who want to learn how a linux system is built and works from the ground up. It shows you everything. Step by step, you are shown how linux is installed on a computer, what happens in the background during installation; booting from bios to mbr, to bootloader to boot partition; packages included with the system and what additional packages that can be added if using internet services; how to configure your system using the command line and text files; how to install packages once the system has been install either through a package manager or using source code.

    This will be a great place to learn forking.

    Combine the lessons learned from arch to debian and linuxmint, you will become a formidable master of your systems.

  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: Changing the OS to make a new one?
    [quote="Zethnos"]Cool thanks. I will check them out in a bit and see what they are like. I'll post back here when I decide. I can't seem to get my PMs to work on here.[/quote] What do you mean "PMs". I want to be clear so I am not making the wrong assumptions.
    Link to this post 01 Dec

    Zethnos said:

    Cool thanks. I will check them out in a bit and see what they are like. I'll post back here when I decide. I can't seem to get my PMs to work on here.

    What do you mean "PMs". I want to be clear so I am not making the wrong assumptions.

  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: Changing the OS to make a new one?
    Haha, sorry. As a new user to linux, a recommend using something that mimics windows a bit. Start with Linuxmint the Xfce edition. It is light weight, allows you to install and remove programs easily using GUI tools, has codecs that allows you to play music, videos and interact with media on the web. It is backed by a great community who's mission is to create a true desktop linux OS. It is based on ubuntu and uses the same repositories, archive of programs that ubuntu downloads its packages from. It can use the latest open source and closed source programs. It has a beautiful visual expression. You will feel right at home with it. You don't need to do any heavy programming, configuration, or hacking. Linuxmint is Linux done for you. All you have to do, is boot and enjoy. [url=http://www.linuxmint.com/release.php?id=22]http://www.linuxmint.com/release.php?id=22[/url] Then when it is time to move on to something more advanced, try debian 7.7. [url=https://www.debian.org/distrib/]https://www.debian.org/distrib/[/url] Of course I am suggesting what I use. You don't have to pick them. There are hundreds of Linux distros. They all have a target audience. I cannot and will not learn all 230 Linux distros. I have picked what works for me and that is what I will stick with. If you take my route, I will be with you every step of the way.
    Link to this post 01 Dec

    Haha, sorry.

    As a new user to linux, a recommend using something that mimics windows a bit. Start with Linuxmint the Xfce edition. It is light weight, allows you to install and remove programs easily using GUI tools, has codecs that allows you to play music, videos and interact with media on the web. It is backed by a great community who's mission is to create a true desktop linux OS. It is based on ubuntu and uses the same repositories, archive of programs that ubuntu downloads its packages from. It can use the latest open source and closed source programs. It has a beautiful visual expression. You will feel right at home with it. You don't need to do any heavy programming, configuration, or hacking. Linuxmint is Linux done for you. All you have to do, is boot and enjoy.

    http://www.linuxmint.com/release.php?id=22


    Then when it is time to move on to something more advanced, try debian 7.7.

    https://www.debian.org/distrib/

    Of course I am suggesting what I use. You don't have to pick them. There are hundreds of Linux distros. They all have a target audience. I cannot and will not learn all 230 Linux distros. I have picked what works for me and that is what I will stick with. If you take my route, I will be with you every step of the way.

  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: Changing the OS to make a new one?
    Use the latest VM version 4.3.20 for windows. [url=https://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads]https://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads[/url]
    Link to this post 30 Nov

    Use the latest VM version 4.3.20 for windows.

    https://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads

  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: Changing the OS to make a new one?
    I have an old tutorial that shows how I did this same thing on Xubuntu 12.04. [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qrSaQChJ70w&index=1&list=PLjKzGLAepus8ob9XGuUKLpsJJqexiymIU]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qrSaQChJ70w&index=1&list=PLjKzGLAepus8ob9XGuUKLpsJJqexiymIU[/url]
    Link to this post 29 Nov

    I have an old tutorial that shows how I did this same thing on Xubuntu 12.04.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qrSaQChJ70w&index=1&list=PLjKzGLAepus8ob9XGuUKLpsJJqexiymIU

  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: Changing the OS to make a new one?
    You can always install Linux on a VM. You can test how the system will function as if it was installed on real hardware. If you have hypervisor extensions support on your CPU, hopefully it is dual-core, you can test all your ideas on that system. It is what we call a virtual sandbox. There is where most prototyping it done. From me to you, power users like systems that expects the users to decide how it functions. There is no "one-system-fits-all". I have done what you were thinking about on debian based systems. To find what works, you will be testing multiple system before you get to one that speaks your language. A few places to start. [url=http://www.linux.com/directory/Distributions/desktop]http://www.linux.com/directory/Distributions/desktop[/url]
    Link to this post 29 Nov

    You can always install Linux on a VM. You can test how the system will function as if it was installed on real hardware. If you have hypervisor extensions support on your CPU, hopefully it is dual-core, you can test all your ideas on that system. It is what we call a virtual sandbox. There is where most prototyping it done.

    From me to you, power users like systems that expects the users to decide how it functions. There is no "one-system-fits-all". I have done what you were thinking about on debian based systems. To find what works, you will be testing multiple system before you get to one that speaks your language.

    A few places to start.

    http://www.linux.com/directory/Distributions/desktop

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