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Istimsak Abdulbasir

Istimsak Abdulbasir

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  • Member Since: 05 Jan 10
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  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: Unexpected token fi
    [quote="lukefrost2014"]I am trying to run my command but it comes up with this error: syntax error near unexpected token `fi' on line 7. Here is my command: if [ $# -gt 0 ] then if [ $1 = head ] || [$1 = tail ] then $1 -n $3 else [color=blue]You did not put an action to execute after the else statement. The "else" statement always needs an action in order for the command to execute properly.[/color] [color=blue][/color] [color=blue]If this is not satisfied[/color], [color=red]"$1 -n $3[/color], [color=blue]what should the command do as a result?[/color] fi fi if [ -d $3 ] then echo "Directory selected exists" else echo "Directory selected does not exist" fi if [[ $2 = *[[:digit:]]* ]]; then echo "value is a digit" else echo "$2 is not an integer" fi [/quote]
    Link to this post 1 day ago

    lukefrost2014 said:

    I am trying to run my command but it comes up with this error:
    syntax error near unexpected token `fi' on line 7.

    Here is my command:

    if [ $# -gt 0 ]
    then
    if [ $1 = head ] || [$1 = tail ]
    then
    $1 -n $3
    else

    You did not put an action to execute after the else statement. The "else" statement always needs an action in order for the command to execute properly.

    If this is not satisfied, "$1 -n $3, what should the command do as a result?

    fi
    fi

    if [ -d $3 ]
    then
    echo "Directory selected exists"
    else
    echo "Directory selected does not exist"
    fi

    if [[ $2 = *[[:digit:]]* ]];
    then
    echo "value is a digit"
    else
    echo "$2 is not an integer"
    fi

  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: Installing Linux Mint 17.1 or Ubuntu 14.04 LTS on MacbookPro
    It will, and I had nothing but good experience with Intel hardware. Lets us know how things went with your new system setup. Take care.
    Link to this post 2 days ago

    It will, and I had nothing but good experience with Intel hardware.

    Lets us know how things went with your new system setup.

    Take care.

  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: Installing Linux Mint 17.1 or Ubuntu 14.04 LTS on MacbookPro
    [quote="Hugenoot"][color=blue]Hi[/color] [color=blue][/color] [color=blue]I am about to entirely replace OS X with Linux. I am pretty clued up as an experienced Linux user but far from being a true geek.[/color] [color=blue][/color] [color=blue]Mac: I like the hardware but not the OS. So I am not really interested in dual-booting at all.[/color] [color=blue][/color] [color=blue]Current MacbookPro (Mavericks) is a 2012 i5 2.5GHz with 4GB DDR and an aftermarket WD 1TB HDD and Mint 17.1 LiveSession runs rather well.[/color] [color=blue][/color] [color=blue]You have in your possession some nice hardware. You can run just about any Linux system on that.[/color] [color=blue][/color] [color=blue]Also considering a new MacbookPro 15" 2.2Ghz i7 Quad with 16GB DDR, IrisPro and a 256GB SSD.[/color] Questions: [list=] [*] [color=blue]Is there any reason NOT to replace the entire OS X?[/color] I believe there are two reasons not to replace your current OS: 1) the hardware does not support Linux 2) you still want to use your current system's native apps FOSS has thousands of software you can use in place of the apps you are using now. They won't work the same or implement the same features. Some are more stable than others. IF those native apps are of high importance, or you cannot find good open source replacements for them, do not wipe your current system Another thing to keep in mind is the support level of linux on your current hardware. You may be able to use the Live-session of your preferred Linux OS, but it might not install correctly on your hardware. Dualbooting will ensure that if something goes wrong, you can always go back to what works. If everything works as planned, or works as satisfactory levels, then you can decide on when to completely let linux take over your system. [*] [color=blue]Will the Macbook allow replacing OS X?[/color] First thing is to find out if that MacOSX hardware will allow another OS to be installed. The question is yes. You can install Linux on Mac-grade hardware. [*] [color=blue]How well does Linux (Mint) handle the Retina display? Will it at least do 1920x1080 resolution, or can Linux go higher?[/color] Depending on the support your chosen Linux system has on your graphic controller, you can either have all or some of the resolution features of your system. Linux upgrades its hardware support database constantly. The generic open drivers that deploys with the more modern Linux systems offers above average support for graphic controllers. If you need to access all the features of your GPU, then it is best to install the proprietary drivers for your system. Should be able to find them on your system's support website. [/list] [/quote]
    Link to this post 2 days ago

    Hugenoot said:

    Hi

    I am about to entirely replace OS X with Linux. I am pretty clued up as an experienced Linux user but far from being a true geek.

    Mac: I like the hardware but not the OS. So I am not really interested in dual-booting at all.

    Current MacbookPro (Mavericks) is a 2012 i5 2.5GHz with 4GB DDR and an aftermarket WD 1TB HDD and Mint 17.1 LiveSession runs rather well.

    You have in your possession some nice hardware. You can run just about any Linux system on that.

    Also considering a new MacbookPro 15" 2.2Ghz i7 Quad with 16GB DDR, IrisPro and a 256GB SSD.

    Questions:
    1. Is there any reason NOT to replace the entire OS X?

      I believe there are two reasons not to replace your current OS:
      1) the hardware does not support Linux
      2) you still want to use your current system's native apps

      FOSS has thousands of software you can use in place of the apps you are using now. They won't work the same or implement the same features. Some are more stable than others. IF those native apps are of high importance, or you cannot find good open source replacements for them, do not wipe your current system

      Another thing to keep in mind is the support level of linux on your current hardware. You may be able to use the Live-session of your preferred Linux OS, but it might not install correctly on your hardware. Dualbooting will ensure that if something goes wrong, you can always go back to what works. If everything works as planned, or works as satisfactory levels, then you can decide on when to completely let linux take over your system.

    2. Will the Macbook allow replacing OS X?

      First thing is to find out if that MacOSX hardware will allow another OS to be installed. The question is yes. You can install Linux on Mac-grade hardware.

    3. How well does Linux (Mint) handle the Retina display? Will it at least do 1920x1080 resolution, or can Linux go higher?

      Depending on the support your chosen Linux system has on your graphic controller, you can either have all or some of the resolution features of your system. Linux upgrades its hardware support database constantly. The generic open drivers that deploys with the more modern Linux systems offers above average support for graphic controllers. If you need to access all the features of your GPU, then it is best to install the proprietary drivers for your system. Should be able to find them on your system's support website.

  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: installing ovftool from vmware
    [quote="ladowny"]Is your /tmp or /var/tmp partition mounted noexec ? I was getting the same error before I remounted the partition execute mount command [code] # mount .... /dev/mapper/hostvg-tmp on /tmp type ext3 (rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev) .... [/code] if you see noexec attriibute next to your tmp partition you need to remount it executable [code] mount -o remount,exec /tmp [/code] This may not always work if you have something running on your system that keeps open files on the /tmp partition ( eg MySQL server often does that ), you can try to mount it exec on boot [code] # vi /etc/fstab [/code] remove noexec attibute in the line [code] /dev/mapper/hostvg-tmp /tmp ext3 defaults,nodev,nosuid,noexec [/code] and reboot your system Note that mounting /tmp noexec is actually security related [/quote] This is an interesting case. Do you think that mounting a folder with [b]noexec[/b] prevents files from executing if they must be ran?
    Link to this post 4 days ago

    ladowny said:

    Is your /tmp or /var/tmp partition mounted noexec ?
    I was getting the same error before I remounted the partition

    execute mount command

    # mount
    ....
    /dev/mapper/hostvg-tmp on /tmp type ext3 (rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev)
    ....


    if you see noexec attriibute next to your tmp partition you need to remount it executable

    mount -o remount,exec /tmp

    This may not always work if you have something running on your system that keeps open files on the /tmp partition ( eg MySQL server often does that ), you can try to mount it exec on boot

    # vi /etc/fstab

    remove noexec attibute in the line

    /dev/mapper/hostvg-tmp /tmp ext3 defaults,nodev,nosuid,noexec


    and reboot your system

    Note that mounting /tmp noexec is actually security related

    This is an interesting case. Do you think that mounting a folder with noexec prevents files from executing if they must be ran?

  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: Just tried to install Ubuntu and now I'm livid.
    The file zone.tab was designed for offline installations. However, whatever changes were made to that file are now permanent. Even if you install ubuntu using internet services, the only option for Montreal time zone is [b]"Eastern Time - Ontario & Quebec - most locations[/b] If you specifically need Montreal time zone, you will have to contact the maintainer of the tzdata package and create a new argument.
    Link to this post 10 Dec

    The file zone.tab was designed for offline installations.

    However, whatever changes were made to that file are now permanent. Even if you install ubuntu using internet services, the only option for Montreal time zone is "Eastern Time - Ontario & Quebec - most locations

    If you specifically need Montreal time zone, you will have to contact the maintainer of the tzdata package and create a new argument.

  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: Just tried to install Ubuntu and now I'm livid.
    It appears when installing Ubuntu offline, your system will only use included packages on the installer media. A file called [b]zone.tap[/b] is used to configure time zones in Ubuntu. Zone.tab, before 2013, included time zones for both Montreal:[b]America/Montreal[/b], and Toronto:[b]America/Toronto[/b] and these zones could be accessed during offline installation. During the 2013 release of the tzdata package, both these time zones have been merged into one time zone region that covers Ontario and Quebec locations. You will have to pick [b]"Eastern Time - Ontario & Quebec - most locations"[/b] to get the time zone for Montreal. [url=https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu-geonames/+bug/1268585/]Ubuntu 14.04 bug report for the Montreal time zone[/url]
    Link to this post 10 Dec

    It appears when installing Ubuntu offline, your system will only use included packages on the installer media. A file called zone.tap is used to configure time zones in Ubuntu.

    Zone.tab, before 2013, included time zones for both Montreal:America/Montreal, and Toronto:America/Toronto and these zones could be accessed during offline installation.

    During the 2013 release of the tzdata package, both these time zones have been merged into one time zone region that covers Ontario and Quebec locations. You will have to pick "Eastern Time - Ontario & Quebec - most locations" to get the time zone for Montreal.

    Ubuntu 14.04 bug report for the Montreal time zone

  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: Hello!
    There are tons of Linux related resources available. So much, it could sink a battle ship, figure of speech. Well to start, be specific on what aspect of Linux you want to learn; linux administration, linux networking, kernel development, development, cloud computing, etc. Use that to collect materials on those aspects. [b]Documentations and howTo's are good sources[/b] Start here: [url=http://www.linux.com/learn/]Learn linux[/url]
    Link to this post 09 Dec

    There are tons of Linux related resources available. So much, it could sink a battle ship, figure of speech.

    Well to start, be specific on what aspect of Linux you want to learn; linux administration, linux networking, kernel development, development, cloud computing, etc. Use that to collect materials on those aspects.

    Documentations and howTo's are good sources

    Start here:

    Learn linux

  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: Bootable DVD and Switchign to Linux Help
    Let us know how things worked out for you.
    Link to this post 09 Dec

    Let us know how things worked out for you.

  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: Linux on Chromebook
    I have never installed Linux on a chromebook. Never had a chromebook. Not yet however :-) Here are a few sites that demonstrates how to install Linux on a chromebook. Perhaps there is something in these tutorials that can help you. [url=http://www.linux.com/learn/tutorials/795730-how-to-easily-install-ubuntu-on-chromebook-with-crouton]Installing Linux in a chromebook using croutun[/url] [url=http://www.howtogeek.com/162120/how-to-install-ubuntu-linux-on-your-chromebook-with-crouton/]How to install ubuntu Linux on your chromebook[/url] This might be interesting for you to read. I learned that if you enable OS verification(disabling developer mode), you will reset your chromebook erasing what you previously did. [b]Removing Crouton and Restoring Your Chromebook[/b] "If you decide you’re done with Linux, you can easily get rid of the scary boot screen and get your internal storage space back. Just reboot your Chromebook normally to get back to the scary warning screen at boot-up. Follow the prompts on your screen (tap the Space bar and then press Enter) to disable Developer Mode. When you disable Developer Mode, your Chromebook will clean everything up, restoring you to a clean, safe locked-down Chrome OS system and overwriting all the changes you’ve made to your Chromebook’s software." (HowToGeek) [b]Enable developer mode[/b] "In order to install your own operating system on Chromebooks, you have to enable the developer mode. It’s extremely easy to do and is very well documented by Google. The latest Chromebooks use a combination of keys to enter the developer mode, whereas older devices have a physical switch. Different devices have different locations for the switch, so please Google your device to find the location of the switch and flip it. If you are on the latest Chromebook then you can enable the developer mode by holding Esc + Refresh keys and then push the ‘power’ button. The recovery screen will show a scary warning. Just ignore it and let Chrome OS wipe your data. The process can take up to 15 minutes, so don’t turn off your Chromebook. Also keep in mind that once Chrome OS is reinstalled you will continue to see this warning every time you boot your system, as long as the developer mode is enabled. However, it won’t wipe the data every time. You can simply hit Ctrl+d to quickly boot into Chrome OS (don’t do it this time while Chrome OS is preparing your system for developer mode)." (Swapnil Bhartiya)
    Link to this post 09 Dec

    I have never installed Linux on a chromebook. Never had a chromebook. Not yet however :-) Here are a few sites that demonstrates how to install Linux on a chromebook. Perhaps there is something in these tutorials that can help you.

    Installing Linux in a chromebook using croutun

    How to install ubuntu Linux on your chromebook


    This might be interesting for you to read. I learned that if you enable OS verification(disabling developer mode), you will reset your chromebook erasing what you previously did.

    Removing Crouton and Restoring Your Chromebook
    "If you decide you’re done with Linux, you can easily get rid of the scary boot screen and get your internal storage space back.

    Just reboot your Chromebook normally to get back to the scary warning screen at boot-up. Follow the prompts on your screen (tap the Space bar and then press Enter) to disable Developer Mode. When you disable Developer Mode, your Chromebook will clean everything up, restoring you to a clean, safe locked-down Chrome OS system and overwriting all the changes you’ve made to your Chromebook’s software." (HowToGeek)


    Enable developer mode
    "In order to install your own operating system on Chromebooks, you have to enable the developer mode. It’s extremely easy to do and is very well documented by Google. The latest Chromebooks use a combination of keys to enter the developer mode, whereas older devices have a physical switch. Different devices have different locations for the switch, so please Google your device to find the location of the switch and flip it. If you are on the latest Chromebook then you can enable the developer mode by holding Esc + Refresh keys and then push the ‘power’ button. The recovery screen will show a scary warning. Just ignore it and let Chrome OS wipe your data. The process can take up to 15 minutes, so don’t turn off your Chromebook.

    Also keep in mind that once Chrome OS is reinstalled you will continue to see this warning every time you boot your system, as long as the developer mode is enabled. However, it won’t wipe the data every time. You can simply hit Ctrl+d to quickly boot into Chrome OS (don’t do it this time while Chrome OS is preparing your system for developer mode)." (Swapnil Bhartiya)

  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: Just tried to install Ubuntu and now I'm livid.
    Perhaps the city Montreal is part of a time zone region. You may have to select the region to get the correct time. What region are you in? Example of Time Zone Regions: [code]1) Newfoundland Time, including SE Labrador 2) Atlantic Time - Nova Scotia (most places), PEI 3) Atlantic Time - Nova Scotia - places that did not observe DST 1966-1971 4) Atlantic Time - New Brunswick 5) Atlantic Time - Labrador - most locations 6) Atlantic Standard Time - Quebec - Lower North Shore 7) Eastern Time - Ontario & Quebec - most locations 8) Eastern Time - Ontario & Quebec - places that did not observe DST 1967-1973 9) Eastern Time - Thunder Bay, Ontario 10) Eastern Time - east Nunavut - most locations 11) Eastern Time - Pangnirtung, Nunavut 12) Central Time - Resolute, Nunavut 13) Eastern Standard Time - Atikokan, Ontario and Southampton I, Nunavut 14) Central Time - central Nunavut 15) Central Time - Manitoba & west Ontario 16) Central Time - Rainy River & Fort Frances, Ontario 17) Central Standard Time - Saskatchewan - most locations 18) Central Standard Time - Saskatchewan - midwest 19) Mountain Time - Alberta, east British Columbia & west Saskatchewan 20) Mountain Time - west Nunavut 21) Mountain Time - central Northwest Territories 22) Mountain Time - west Northwest Territories 23) Mountain Standard Time - Creston, British Columbia 24) Mountain Standard Time - Dawson Creek & Fort Saint John, British Columbia 25) Pacific Time - west British Columbia 26) Pacific Time - south Yukon 27) Pacific Time - north Yukon[/code] Ubuntu supports hundreds of languages which would mean it supports the majority of time zones if not all. Discover the time zones ubuntu supports or supported time Zone regions. Then determine that time zone region Montreal is located in. [url=http://manpages.ubuntu.com/manpages/utopic/man1/tzselect.1.html]Selecting Time Zones in Ubuntu[/url]
    Link to this post 09 Dec

    Perhaps the city Montreal is part of a time zone region. You may have to select the region to get the correct time.

    What region are you in?

    Example of Time Zone Regions:

    1) Newfoundland Time, including SE Labrador
    2) Atlantic Time - Nova Scotia (most places), PEI
    3) Atlantic Time - Nova Scotia - places that did not observe DST 1966-1971
    4) Atlantic Time - New Brunswick
    5) Atlantic Time - Labrador - most locations
    6) Atlantic Standard Time - Quebec - Lower North Shore
    7) Eastern Time - Ontario & Quebec - most locations
    8) Eastern Time - Ontario & Quebec - places that did not observe DST 1967-1973
    9) Eastern Time - Thunder Bay, Ontario
    10) Eastern Time - east Nunavut - most locations
    11) Eastern Time - Pangnirtung, Nunavut
    12) Central Time - Resolute, Nunavut
    13) Eastern Standard Time - Atikokan, Ontario and Southampton I, Nunavut
    14) Central Time - central Nunavut
    15) Central Time - Manitoba & west Ontario
    16) Central Time - Rainy River & Fort Frances, Ontario
    17) Central Standard Time - Saskatchewan - most locations
    18) Central Standard Time - Saskatchewan - midwest
    19) Mountain Time - Alberta, east British Columbia & west Saskatchewan
    20) Mountain Time - west Nunavut
    21) Mountain Time - central Northwest Territories
    22) Mountain Time - west Northwest Territories
    23) Mountain Standard Time - Creston, British Columbia
    24) Mountain Standard Time - Dawson Creek & Fort Saint John, British Columbia
    25) Pacific Time - west British Columbia
    26) Pacific Time - south Yukon
    27) Pacific Time - north Yukon

    Ubuntu supports hundreds of languages which would mean it supports the majority of time zones if not all. Discover the time zones ubuntu supports or supported time Zone regions. Then determine that time zone region Montreal is located in.

    Selecting Time Zones in Ubuntu


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