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Rubberman

Rubberman

  • Linux.com Member
  • Posts: 504
  • Member Since: 21 Apr 09
  • Last Logged In: 22 Feb

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  • Rubberman
    RE: Please give me a few tips.
    One other thing - I also run a variety of emulators for other CPU families (ARM, MIPS, etc) on these systems as well. I need to emulate an entire raft of mobile phone systems, which I do. All of this is done in virtual machines or emulated machines (different CPU types).
    Link to this post 25 Apr 12

    One other thing - I also run a variety of emulators for other CPU families (ARM, MIPS, etc) on these systems as well. I need to emulate an entire raft of mobile phone systems, which I do. All of this is done in virtual machines or emulated machines (different CPU types).

  • Rubberman
    RE: Please give me a few tips.
    Usually Linux loads a lot faster than Windoze; however, the latest versions of Ubuntu are starting to get really bloated. Myself, in order to learn about and get comfortable with new operating systems, I don't dual boot them. Rather, I will install a virtual machine manager such as VirtualBox (free) and run the new operating systems in a virtual machine in my host OS. Examples: At home, my main system is a Red Hat Enterprise Linux clone (Scientific Linux). I run Windows, other Linux systems, Solaris, QNX, and DOS in VirtualBox virtual machines. At work, my main system is a Windows 7 laptop. I run Linux (several versions), Windows XP, and other systems in VirtualBox virtual machines. Why? Because doing it this way I can allocate just as much system resources as I want to the operating system in question, and they don't mess with my main OS configuration. If I want to remove them entirely, it is a matter of deleting some files.
    Link to this post 25 Apr 12

    Usually Linux loads a lot faster than Windoze; however, the latest versions of Ubuntu are starting to get really bloated. Myself, in order to learn about and get comfortable with new operating systems, I don't dual boot them. Rather, I will install a virtual machine manager such as VirtualBox (free) and run the new operating systems in a virtual machine in my host OS. Examples:

    At home, my main system is a Red Hat Enterprise Linux clone (Scientific Linux). I run Windows, other Linux systems, Solaris, QNX, and DOS in VirtualBox virtual machines.

    At work, my main system is a Windows 7 laptop. I run Linux (several versions), Windows XP, and other systems in VirtualBox virtual machines.

    Why? Because doing it this way I can allocate just as much system resources as I want to the operating system in question, and they don't mess with my main OS configuration. If I want to remove them entirely, it is a matter of deleting some files.

  • Rubberman
    RE: Locked Out!
    AHarris's last comment was not far off the mark. If you think you may have been infected with a virus, what I do for my consulting clients in such a case is extract the drive from their system, plug it into a dock on my Linux system, and scan it with 3 different A/V scanners (there a a bunch for Linux systems that will catch Linux and Windows virus-infected files and discs). If it is a Linux system drive, then after scanning/cleaning it, I set the root password to an empty string (no password), put it back in their system with it set to boot into single user mode (no graphics), boot up, login to root, reset the root password and any affected user accounts (or all of them if necessary), and set all user accounts to require changing their password on next login. Yes, this is a major PITA, but the alternatives are much less appealing! I have also done all this by booting into a live/recovery CD/DVD/USB drive, installing the A/V programs temporarily in the recovery systems (along with updating virus signature files), mounting and scanning the system partitions / discs as necessary, and doing the other cruft (single-user mode, no GUI, reset passwords, etc). I only do that if I can't get the system drive to my workstation/server, like when I need to do an onsite call, though then I take my laptop and docking bay with all my tools installed. Much cleaner!
    Link to this post 24 Apr 12

    AHarris's last comment was not far off the mark. If you think you may have been infected with a virus, what I do for my consulting clients in such a case is extract the drive from their system, plug it into a dock on my Linux system, and scan it with 3 different A/V scanners (there a a bunch for Linux systems that will catch Linux and Windows virus-infected files and discs). If it is a Linux system drive, then after scanning/cleaning it, I set the root password to an empty string (no password), put it back in their system with it set to boot into single user mode (no graphics), boot up, login to root, reset the root password and any affected user accounts (or all of them if necessary), and set all user accounts to require changing their password on next login.

    Yes, this is a major PITA, but the alternatives are much less appealing! I have also done all this by booting into a live/recovery CD/DVD/USB drive, installing the A/V programs temporarily in the recovery systems (along with updating virus signature files), mounting and scanning the system partitions / discs as necessary, and doing the other cruft (single-user mode, no GUI, reset passwords, etc). I only do that if I can't get the system drive to my workstation/server, like when I need to do an onsite call, though then I take my laptop and docking bay with all my tools installed. Much cleaner!

  • Rubberman
    RE: Locked Out!
    Boot with a recovery CD/DVD disc. Mount the root file system. Edit the file /etc/inittab in the mounted file system and change the runlevel to 3. Then reboot from disc. That will boot you into text mode so you can login as root and fix the GUI and other cruft.
    Link to this post 21 Apr 12

    Boot with a recovery CD/DVD disc. Mount the root file system. Edit the file /etc/inittab in the mounted file system and change the runlevel to 3. Then reboot from disc. That will boot you into text mode so you can login as root and fix the GUI and other cruft.

  • Rubberman
    RE: double spacing
    No problem. Sometimes, these sort of things just need to be exposed to the light to correct themselves... :-)
    Link to this post 19 Apr 12

    No problem. Sometimes, these sort of things just need to be exposed to the light to correct themselves... :-)

  • Rubberman
    RE: double spacing
    Well the lpi (lines / inch) seems correct. Word-wrap is on, so I am wondering if it may be possible that there are fill characters at the end of the lines that may be forcing a wrap? If not in the original document, then perhaps the CUPS driver is inserting them incorrectly? I'm just trying to think of what could be causing this situation. Another thing to check is the driver you are using on CentOS. Make sure it is the same one you are using on Red Hat, assuming it would be compatible. What versions of CentOS and RedHat are you running?
    Link to this post 19 Apr 12

    Well the lpi (lines / inch) seems correct. Word-wrap is on, so I am wondering if it may be possible that there are fill characters at the end of the lines that may be forcing a wrap? If not in the original document, then perhaps the CUPS driver is inserting them incorrectly? I'm just trying to think of what could be causing this situation. Another thing to check is the driver you are using on CentOS. Make sure it is the same one you are using on Red Hat, assuming it would be compatible. What versions of CentOS and RedHat are you running?

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