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GoinEasy9

GoinEasy9

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  • Member Since: 13 May 09
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  • GoinEasy9
    RE: Applications and World of Warcraft
    Thanks Richard, I was trying to remember that one myself. My rapidly ageing brain couldn't Google it up.
    Link to this post 09 Apr 12

    Thanks Richard, I was trying to remember that one myself. My rapidly ageing brain couldn't Google it up.

  • GoinEasy9
    RE: Avast! Anti Virus for Linux, kind of cool.
    I use Avast on the one Windows machine that we use to download coupons, the only thing I can't do in Linux. Since I don't surf the internet in Windows, I haven't encountered anything that would infect the Windows machine, so, I can't really judge the product on it's merits. I have seen a post though, that said that their anti-virus for Android (Which I probably don't need either), comes with a lost/stolen phone feature similar to Prey. I might take a look at it in the future. I'm still looking for a good app that will track the phone if it is lost or stolen. Since I don't use Windows, I have little use for an anti-virus that checks Windows files. I have Fedora hardened with SELinux and a double firewall (router & desktop), so, I feel pretty secure here. There still hasn't been a virus or trojan that has spread in the Linux universe, so, I'm feeling pretty safe here. BTW - I discussed the recent Apple virus with a niece who owns a Mac laptop today, and read through explanation of how it propagated. It seems that the user is asked for permission before the trojan is installed, and, without that permission, no infection. Unlike Linux, there was no message in the update window as to what was about to be updated. Was it Automatic updating that was the problem? And why would anyone except an update without an explanation? I saw the window that opened in a post (sorry I don't have a link handy), all it said was an update was ready and permission was needed for it to continue. I'm glad I get to choose what and where I get my updates from. I thought Apple and its BSD based OS had similar features. I'm not a Mac user, so, can't say for certain. Just happy I'm a Linux user.
    Link to this post 09 Apr 12

    I use Avast on the one Windows machine that we use to download coupons, the only thing I can't do in Linux. Since I don't surf the internet in Windows, I haven't encountered anything that would infect the Windows machine, so, I can't really judge the product on it's merits.

    I have seen a post though, that said that their anti-virus for Android (Which I probably don't need either), comes with a lost/stolen phone feature similar to Prey. I might take a look at it in the future. I'm still looking for a good app that will track the phone if it is lost or stolen.

    Since I don't use Windows, I have little use for an anti-virus that checks Windows files. I have Fedora hardened with SELinux and a double firewall (router & desktop), so, I feel pretty secure here. There still hasn't been a virus or trojan that has spread in the Linux universe, so, I'm feeling pretty safe here.

    BTW - I discussed the recent Apple virus with a niece who owns a Mac laptop today, and read through explanation of how it propagated. It seems that the user is asked for permission before the trojan is installed, and, without that permission, no infection. Unlike Linux, there was no message in the update window as to what was about to be updated. Was it Automatic updating that was the problem? And why would anyone except an update without an explanation? I saw the window that opened in a post (sorry I don't have a link handy), all it said was an update was ready and permission was needed for it to continue. I'm glad I get to choose what and where I get my updates from. I thought Apple and its BSD based OS had similar features. I'm not a Mac user, so, can't say for certain. Just happy I'm a Linux user.

  • GoinEasy9
    RE: AvLinux - nVidia GeForce560 HDMI - No Sound
    I'm sorry about the lack of responses. Your problem is unique, but, not unanswerable. Unfortunately, I don't know any of the mods or forum members that use hardware as you do. That, and the fact that Linux.com forums were down for a few months at the end of last year because of the security breach, we now have many fewer forum members than we used to. Thus, we lost many of our experts. While we try to answer as many problems as we can, and, still have quite a few experts helping, we can no longer address every problem, or address them as quickly as we used to. Feel free to visit and share your knowledge as we rebuild the forums to their former glory. We can use the help, and, if you do solve your problem, please let us know how, so, others who visit can gain from your problem solving. Thanks again for visiting and responding. Tom
    Link to this post 09 Apr 12

    I'm sorry about the lack of responses. Your problem is unique, but, not unanswerable. Unfortunately, I don't know any of the mods or forum members that use hardware as you do. That, and the fact that Linux.com forums were down for a few months at the end of last year because of the security breach, we now have many fewer forum members than we used to. Thus, we lost many of our experts.

    While we try to answer as many problems as we can, and, still have quite a few experts helping, we can no longer address every problem, or address them as quickly as we used to.

    Feel free to visit and share your knowledge as we rebuild the forums to their former glory. We can use the help, and, if you do solve your problem, please let us know how, so, others who visit can gain from your problem solving.

    Thanks again for visiting and responding.

    Tom

  • GoinEasy9
    RE: camera sensor module
    I'm sorry but your question is beyond my knowledge, and, I'm removing your duplicate post from the other forum. Please don't duplicate, the same question is seen by all. Also, be patient, it's a holiday weekend here in the US, so, many of our forum members are out and about instead of glued to their computers. Someone should come along eventually that has the answer you're looking for.
    Link to this post 08 Apr 12

    I'm sorry but your question is beyond my knowledge, and, I'm removing your duplicate post from the other forum. Please don't duplicate, the same question is seen by all.

    Also, be patient, it's a holiday weekend here in the US, so, many of our forum members are out and about instead of glued to their computers. Someone should come along eventually that has the answer you're looking for.

  • GoinEasy9
    RE: What's the difference between:Gnome +Mate / LXDE / KDE?
    Gnome, Mate, KDE, LXDE and XFCE are all different Desktop Managers. One must try them to actually see the differences. I'm a fan of KDE, well, it's the most configurable to me. Other folks like the new look of Gnome (Gnome3), because it looks more like a modern day tablet or phone. Mate is a fork of Gnome 2. They forked it because many of the Gnome 2 fans did not like the new look of Gnome 3 (Mate is Gnome 2 unchanged). Cinnamon is another fork of Gnome 2, except that it uses the shell of Gnome 3. Unity is Ubuntu's answer to Gnome 3 and LXDE and XFCE are older, stable (but still improving) lighter desktop managers, and, there are many more. If you're looking at Ubuntu, as I said before, they feature the Unity desktop. One of the other mods here favours it, as do many of the Ubuntu fans, although many of the older Ubuntu fans didn't like the new look and changed distros. BTW - The reason Ubuntu created Unity was because they didn't like the look of Gnome 3. Mint, which is/was a more user friendly version of Ubuntu, didn't like the new look of Unity, and, started creating their own desktop manager so they wouldn't have to use Unity. They created Cinnamon, which is a cross between Gnome 2 and Gnome 3 with the look and feel of Gnome 2. Heh, confused yet? Which is the reason I said you have to try them for yourself to see which one you prefer. Live CD's are a good way to get a feel for a distro and their corresponding desktop managers. They run a bit slower than the installed to hard drive version would be, but they are good for testing and getting used to the look and feel. Most of the different desktop managers have all the features that the others have, and, there's no reason why you couldn't run a Gnome based application in KDE or vice versa. When I switched to Gnome a few years back I used to run a lot of KDE applications with it. When I switched back to KDE, I continued to use some of the Gnome applications that I was comfortable with when I used Gnome. The nice thing about Linux is you get to choose what you like and include it in the distro you're running. Or, you can choose a distro and then pick and choose the features you like during installation, so, it's not the same as the default version. If you've looked at Ubuntu and Mint, give their Live CD's a try and see how they feel. I'm running Fedora right now, and, I can download Live CD's in many flavours. The default of Gnome 3, the KDE version, the XFCE version or the LXDE version. Even though Fedora defaults to Gnome 3, I decided to use the KDE version, and I chose that when installing. The install DVD has all the choices in one place, or, you can install directly from the Live CD's of each version. If you have any other questions, please ask. I hope my answer helped more than it confused, heh. Tom
    Link to this post 08 Apr 12

    Gnome, Mate, KDE, LXDE and XFCE are all different Desktop Managers. One must try them to actually see the differences. I'm a fan of KDE, well, it's the most configurable to me. Other folks like the new look of Gnome (Gnome3), because it looks more like a modern day tablet or phone. Mate is a fork of Gnome 2. They forked it because many of the Gnome 2 fans did not like the new look of Gnome 3 (Mate is Gnome 2 unchanged). Cinnamon is another fork of Gnome 2, except that it uses the shell of Gnome 3. Unity is Ubuntu's answer to Gnome 3 and LXDE and XFCE are older, stable (but still improving) lighter desktop managers, and, there are many more.

    If you're looking at Ubuntu, as I said before, they feature the Unity desktop. One of the other mods here favours it, as do many of the Ubuntu fans, although many of the older Ubuntu fans didn't like the new look and changed distros. BTW - The reason Ubuntu created Unity was because they didn't like the look of Gnome 3. Mint, which is/was a more user friendly version of Ubuntu, didn't like the new look of Unity, and, started creating their own desktop manager so they wouldn't have to use Unity. They created Cinnamon, which is a cross between Gnome 2 and Gnome 3 with the look and feel of Gnome 2.

    Heh, confused yet? Which is the reason I said you have to try them for yourself to see which one you prefer. Live CD's are a good way to get a feel for a distro and their corresponding desktop managers. They run a bit slower than the installed to hard drive version would be, but they are good for testing and getting used to the look and feel.

    Most of the different desktop managers have all the features that the others have, and, there's no reason why you couldn't run a Gnome based application in KDE or vice versa. When I switched to Gnome a few years back I used to run a lot of KDE applications with it. When I switched back to KDE, I continued to use some of the Gnome applications that I was comfortable with when I used Gnome.

    The nice thing about Linux is you get to choose what you like and include it in the distro you're running. Or, you can choose a distro and then pick and choose the features you like during installation, so, it's not the same as the default version.

    If you've looked at Ubuntu and Mint, give their Live CD's a try and see how they feel. I'm running Fedora right now, and, I can download Live CD's in many flavours. The default of Gnome 3, the KDE version, the XFCE version or the LXDE version. Even though Fedora defaults to Gnome 3, I decided to use the KDE version, and I chose that when installing. The install DVD has all the choices in one place, or, you can install directly from the Live CD's of each version.

    If you have any other questions, please ask. I hope my answer helped more than it confused, heh.

    Tom

  • GoinEasy9
    RE: Lost my profile and other customization after adding new harddrives
    From what you told us, you seemed to do everything correctly, but, how did you move /home? When you copied the contents of /home, did you also copy the hidden directories? Those are the one that begin with a period. They are used fr many things, and, one of the things they are used for is to hold personal configuration files. For example, I use KDE and many of my personal KDE settings are in the .kde folder in my /home directory. When you go into your File Manager, under View, click on the "Show Hidden Files" and you will see what I mean. If by some chance you know about the hidden files, and I guessed wrong, let us know.
    Link to this post 08 Apr 12

    From what you told us, you seemed to do everything correctly, but, how did you move /home? When you copied the contents of /home, did you also copy the hidden directories? Those are the one that begin with a period. They are used fr many things, and, one of the things they are used for is to hold personal configuration files. For example, I use KDE and many of my personal KDE settings are in the .kde folder in my /home directory.

    When you go into your File Manager, under View, click on the "Show Hidden Files" and you will see what I mean.

    If by some chance you know about the hidden files, and I guessed wrong, let us know.

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