Linux.com

KenJackson

KenJackson

  • Linux.com Member
  • Posts: 3
  • Member Since: 24 Aug 10
  • Last Logged In: 26 Aug 13

Latest Posts

Posted by
Topic
Post Preview
Posted
  • KenJackson
    RE: How can I use man with special title ?
    I'm not sure I understand you question. Are you saying you want to skip everything before the description? If so, this works, although you loose the bold formatting: [code]man objdump | sed -n /DESCRIP/,\$p | less[/code]
    Link to this post 03 Aug 13

    I'm not sure I understand you question. Are you saying you want to skip everything before the description?

    If so, this works, although you loose the bold formatting:

    man objdump | sed -n /DESCRIP/,\$p | less

  • KenJackson
    RE: downloading in linux
    [quote="rtrg"]Is there a way to download ANYTHING in LINUX NOT using the command line approach?[/quote] Linux has about ten web browsers to choose from. (How many does Windows offer?) All of them download things by clicking or right clicking. I see the command-line and scripting as empowerment, so it's hard for me to identify with your complaint. But I believe Gnome and KDE are both frequently criticized for being too much like Windows. You may just need to install some more bells and whistles.
    Link to this post 01 Jun 13

    rtrg said:

    Is there a way to download ANYTHING in LINUX NOT using the command line approach?

    Linux has about ten web browsers to choose from. (How many does Windows offer?) All of them download things by clicking or right clicking.

    I see the command-line and scripting as empowerment, so it's hard for me to identify with your complaint. But I believe Gnome and KDE are both frequently criticized for being too much like Windows. You may just need to install some more bells and whistles.

  • KenJackson
    RE: use of "const volatile" variable. [ Not using pointers]
    My favorite use of "[i]const volatile[/i]" is a time or ticks counter in embedded apps. That is, if I have an interrupt service routine (ISR) that increments an integer once per tick (maybe once per msec), it's convenient and efficient to use the variable directly, without calling a function. But you want to make it safe, so no one accidentally changes it or passes it's address to a function that changes it. Of course the ISR has to cast it to write it (e.g. *(int *)&ticks += 1;). An even more popular use is for processor register declarations. Many processors have memory-mapped registers that you can read but not write which are updated by hardware. They're definitely "[i]const[/i]" because you can't write them, and they're definitely "[i]volatile[/i]" because the hardware can update them at any time.
    Link to this post 01 Jun 13

    My favorite use of "const volatile" is a time or ticks counter in embedded apps.

    That is, if I have an interrupt service routine (ISR) that increments an integer once per tick (maybe once per msec), it's convenient and efficient to use the variable directly, without calling a function. But you want to make it safe, so no one accidentally changes it or passes it's address to a function that changes it. Of course the ISR has to cast it to write it (e.g. *(int *)&ticks += 1;).

    An even more popular use is for processor register declarations. Many processors have memory-mapped registers that you can read but not write which are updated by hardware. They're definitely "const" because you can't write them, and they're definitely "volatile" because the hardware can update them at any time.

Who we are ?

The Linux Foundation is a non-profit consortium dedicated to the growth of Linux.

More About the foundation...

Frequent Questions

Join / Linux Training / Board