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atreyu

atreyu

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  • Posts: 218
  • Member Since: 06 May 09
  • Last Logged In: 10 Jun 13

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  • atreyu
    RE: Learning linux severs: Red Hat or Centos ?
    [b]marc wrote:[/b] [quote] 1st: SL hasn't released a 5.6 version whereas CentOS has. 2nd (and importand one): CentOS support is *longer* The thing is that one of the main centos developers (Dag) left the project months ago and they've been restructuring Regards[/quote] Fortunately, we are solidly entrenched in 5.5 so we're not affected by that. That definitely hurts losing Dag. I've been benefiting from his hard work for years. I remember reading about his laptop getting stolen and him losing a lot of work.
    Link to this post 20 May 11

    marc wrote:


    1st: SL hasn't released a 5.6 version whereas CentOS has.

    2nd (and importand one): CentOS support is *longer*

    The thing is that one of the main centos developers (Dag) left the project months ago and they've been restructuring

    Regards

    Fortunately, we are solidly entrenched in 5.5 so we're not affected by that.
    That definitely hurts losing Dag. I've been benefiting from his hard work for years. I remember reading about his laptop getting stolen and him losing a lot of work.

  • atreyu
    RE: Learning linux severs: Red Hat or Centos ?
    You bring up a good point, Goineasy9. I depend on CentOS a lot and right now, we're happy on 5.x, but if we need to support a RH 6 soon, SL may be the way to go. This is a good read on the subject (from Brian Proffitt, posted yesterday): [url]http://www.itworld.com/open-source/166067/hyper-v-shines-spotlight-centos-ready-soon-60-release[/url]
    Link to this post 20 May 11

    You bring up a good point, Goineasy9. I depend on CentOS a lot and right now, we're happy on 5.x, but if we need to support a RH 6 soon, SL may be the way to go.

    This is a good read on the subject (from Brian Proffitt, posted yesterday):
    http://www.itworld.com/open-source/166067/hyper-v-shines-spotlight-centos-ready-soon-60-release

  • atreyu
    RE: BT module in Slackware
    [b]mfillpot wrote:[/b] [quote]The installed system scripts work that way because there are scripts in rc.local and rc.M stating to check the specific system scripts for executable rights prior to launching them. People cannot just drop executable scripts into the folder and expect them to work, they must first add the correct initialization scripts to the correct files. I consider this a better method than what is used by distros that use the SystemV init method in which any executable script that is placed into a runlevel folder is executed without any further modifications.[/quote] At least with Fedora/RH-based Linux, system initscripts will not be run by the system unless the proper symlinks have been generated for them for the specific runlevels in which they are supposed to run. These runlevels are defined at the top of each initscript ( e.g., "# chkconfig: - 85 15" ). So you can drop an executable script in /etc/init.d/ but it won't run until you: a) put the proper "chkconfig" entry at the top of the script b) run a command to create the symlinks, e.g. "chkconfig --add myService" , or create them manually
    Link to this post 19 May 11

    mfillpot wrote:

    The installed system scripts work that way because there are scripts in rc.local and rc.M stating to check the specific system scripts for executable rights prior to launching them. People cannot just drop executable scripts into the folder and expect them to work, they must first add the correct initialization scripts to the correct files. I consider this a better method than what is used by distros that use the SystemV init method in which any executable script that is placed into a runlevel folder is executed without any further modifications.

    At least with Fedora/RH-based Linux, system initscripts will not be run by the system unless the proper symlinks have been generated for them for the specific runlevels in which they are supposed to run. These runlevels are defined at the top of each initscript ( e.g., "# chkconfig: - 85 15" ). So you can drop an executable script in /etc/init.d/ but it won't run until you:

    a) put the proper "chkconfig" entry at the top of the script
    b) run a command to create the symlinks, e.g. "chkconfig --add myService" , or create them manually

  • atreyu
    RE: Doubt in linux file management?
    [b]linustorvalds wrote:[/b] [quote]Hai, Am using slackware,fedora. In both cases , there are two dirs, 1. /usr/src/linux-{Kernerl version}/ 2. /lib/modules/{kernel-version}/ what is the difference b/w these two? Actually , these two dir content are totally different, I agree. But, which one is the Kernel source ? :huh: For writing device drivers, I am using the second one. But, actually, the first one only is in "src" dir . I am not sure , this question is meaningfull or not, may this is so naive. But , want to know the difference. thank you[/quote] Just to be clear, in Fedora, the kernel source (packaged in kernel-devel or kernel-PAE-devel) is installed to: /usr/src/kernels/{kernel_version}/ and like mfillpot said, the kernel modules, etc. are installed to: /lib/modules/{kernel_version}/ In this directory is a directory named "source" which is actuall a symbolic link to "build" in the same dir and "build" is actually a symbolic link to the above kernel source dir (/usr/src/kernels/{kernel_version}/).
    Link to this post 19 May 11

    linustorvalds wrote:

    Hai,

    Am using slackware,fedora. In both cases , there are two dirs,

    1. /usr/src/linux-{Kernerl version}/
    2. /lib/modules/{kernel-version}/


    what is the difference b/w these two? Actually , these two dir content are totally different, I agree. But, which one is the Kernel source ? :huh:

    For writing device drivers, I am using the second one. But, actually, the first one only is in "src" dir .

    I am not sure , this question is meaningfull or not, may this is so naive. But , want to know the difference. thank you

    Just to be clear, in Fedora, the kernel source (packaged in kernel-devel or kernel-PAE-devel) is installed to:

    /usr/src/kernels/{kernel_version}/

    and like mfillpot said, the kernel modules, etc. are installed to:

    /lib/modules/{kernel_version}/

    In this directory is a directory named "source" which is actuall a symbolic link to "build" in the same dir and "build" is actually a symbolic link to the above kernel source dir (/usr/src/kernels/{kernel_version}/).

  • atreyu
    RE: Suggestions for a career in Linux
    [b]marc wrote:[/b] [quote]LAMP is just Linux + Apache + Mysql + PHP[/quote] or for me, Linux + Apache + Mysql + Perl! Yes, knowing how to do things from the command line is great advice. To be a good (FILL_IN_THE_OS) systems administrator, you should know the basics, e.g., how to: - Network PCs together - Apply updates to the system - Set up and manage user/group accounts - Set up and configure network services (printing, web server, FTP, File Sharing, firewalls, etc.) - Perform disk/filesystem management - Learn to write shell scripts that help you do the above stuff That's just a beginning. My advice to you, is to get at least two Linux PCs up and running (really challenge yourself and make one RPM-based and one-Debian based) and start teaching yourself how to do the above things. To learn the ins and outs of the scripts that glue Linux together, check out the init scripts in /etc/init.d/. They're mostly written in Bash and make great resources when you start writing your own scripts. I'd also recommend learning Perl (it's great for playing w/text files), if you're going to be SysAdmin, but that can come later. And of course, ask questions here.
    Link to this post 19 May 11

    marc wrote:

    LAMP is just Linux + Apache + Mysql + PHP

    or for me, Linux + Apache + Mysql + Perl!

    Yes, knowing how to do things from the command line is great advice. To be a good (FILL_IN_THE_OS) systems administrator, you should know the basics, e.g., how to:

    - Network PCs together

    - Apply updates to the system

    - Set up and manage user/group accounts

    - Set up and configure network services (printing, web server, FTP, File Sharing, firewalls, etc.)

    - Perform disk/filesystem management

    - Learn to write shell scripts that help you do the above stuff

    That's just a beginning. My advice to you, is to get at least two Linux PCs up and running (really challenge yourself and make one RPM-based and one-Debian based) and start teaching yourself how to do the above things.

    To learn the ins and outs of the scripts that glue Linux together, check out the init scripts in /etc/init.d/. They're mostly written in Bash and make great resources when you start writing your own scripts. I'd also recommend learning Perl (it's great for playing w/text files), if you're going to be SysAdmin, but that can come later.

    And of course, ask questions here.

  • atreyu
    RE: Incorrect screen size
    I'll try to help, but I don't know all the right Ubuntu commands (hopefully someone can jump in and correct me). Before editing the Xorg config file, I assume you've tried running any Preferences-type settings that can be launched from within the Desktop environment (Gnome, etc.) itself to change the res? Assuming you have, and you've still had no luck, then you can try: 1) Manually editing the Xorg config file 2) Installing missing drivers 1) To edit the xorg config file, do this in a terminal: [code]sudo gedit /etc/X11/xorg.conf[/code] and look for a section like: [code] Section "Device" Identifier "Videocard0" Driver "vesa" EndSection [/code] To try the intel driver, change "vesa" to "i810" (or "intel", not sure which). To add the HorizSync/VertRefresh info, find those values from some laptop documentation, then put them under the monitor section of the xorg file, e.g.: [code] Section "Monitor" Identifier "Monitor0" VendorName "Monitor Vendor" ModelName "Dell E193FP" HorizSync 30.0 - 83.0 VertRefresh 56.0 - 76.0 Option "dpms" EndSection [/code] Don't use the above values, those are for my monitor! 2) For 1) to work, you might have to install the Intel Graphics driver first, if it is missing. It'll be some "apt-get install ..." command (help anyone?). I think you can do "apt-cache search ..." for it, or something like that. To test your changes you have to restart the X server. You can do that by simply rebooting, but sometimes the Ctrl+Alt+Backspace key combo does it, too. hth
    Link to this post 19 May 11

    I'll try to help, but I don't know all the right Ubuntu commands (hopefully someone can jump in and correct me).

    Before editing the Xorg config file, I assume you've tried running any Preferences-type settings that can be launched from within the Desktop environment (Gnome, etc.) itself to change the res?

    Assuming you have, and you've still had no luck, then you can try:

    1) Manually editing the Xorg config file
    2) Installing missing drivers

    1) To edit the xorg config file, do this in a terminal:

    sudo gedit /etc/X11/xorg.conf

    and look for a section like:


    Section "Device"
    Identifier "Videocard0"
    Driver "vesa"
    EndSection

    To try the intel driver, change "vesa" to "i810" (or "intel", not sure which).

    To add the HorizSync/VertRefresh info, find those values from some laptop documentation, then put them under the monitor section of the xorg file, e.g.:


    Section "Monitor"
    Identifier "Monitor0"
    VendorName "Monitor Vendor"
    ModelName "Dell E193FP"
    HorizSync 30.0 - 83.0
    VertRefresh 56.0 - 76.0
    Option "dpms"
    EndSection

    Don't use the above values, those are for my monitor!

    2) For 1) to work, you might have to install the Intel Graphics driver first, if it is missing. It'll be some "apt-get install ..." command (help anyone?). I think you can do "apt-cache search ..." for it, or something like that.

    To test your changes you have to restart the X server. You can do that by simply rebooting, but sometimes the Ctrl+Alt+Backspace key combo does it, too.

    hth

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