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Jonny10

Jonny10

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  • Posts: 4
  • Member Since: 09 Mar 11
  • Last Logged In: 18 Mar 11

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  • Jonny10
    RE: Switching Over
    Hello, I am installing and need some guidance setting up my paritions. Win 7 Starter is preloaded on 250 Gb ntfs hard drive. I have Kubuntu installer running - I want to dual boot. So I selected manually manage paritions (only other option is reformat hard drive for 100% kubuntu) What I dont understand is partitioning order, does it matter? By default it says: Device Type Mount Point Format? Size Used /dev/sda (unchecked box) /dev/sda1 ntfs (unchecked box) 1572 MB 524 MB /dev/sda2 ntfs (unchecked box) 223955 MB 17759 MB /dev/sda3 ntfs (unchecked box) 15208 MB 7229 MB /dev/sda4 ntfs (unchecked box) 9320 MB 8616 MB When I right/double click on each partion I get: the following options for each [ new partition size; "use as:"; format parition (y/n); mount point] OK so I want to allocate 40-70GB to Windows and the rest to Kubuntu. So appartantly I need a swap file, root, and a home partition? I have found no good guides. Windows format should be ntfs (not FAT32?) and Kubuntu shold be ext3? what about ext4 (better/worse?)? Mount point should read windows, root, swap, home? Should I have format checked? Windows should be in sda1? Is the order of Windows, swap, root, Kubuntu, partitioning important? I've read it is good to have Windows as first, and extra space at the end. Is the first partition sda1? (count upwards and not down?) I have 2 Gb RAM should I make my swap file 4Gb or 3 Gb? Should I just exit installer. Boot windows and partition once (with Gparted 60 Gb for windows/ 190Gb for Kubuntu). Exit. Run installer and tell it to use full 190 Gb as it wants? Any feedback is appreciated, J
    Link to this post 18 Mar 11

    Hello,

    I am installing and need some guidance setting up my paritions.
    Win 7 Starter is preloaded on 250 Gb ntfs hard drive.

    I have Kubuntu installer running - I want to dual boot.
    So I selected manually manage paritions (only other option is reformat hard drive for 100% kubuntu)
    What I dont understand is partitioning order, does it matter?
    By default it says:

    Device Type Mount Point Format? Size Used

    /dev/sda (unchecked box)
    /dev/sda1 ntfs (unchecked box) 1572 MB 524 MB
    /dev/sda2 ntfs (unchecked box) 223955 MB 17759 MB
    /dev/sda3 ntfs (unchecked box) 15208 MB 7229 MB
    /dev/sda4 ntfs (unchecked box) 9320 MB 8616 MB

    When I right/double click on each partion I get: the following options for each
    [ new partition size; "use as:"; format parition (y/n); mount point]

    OK so I want to allocate 40-70GB to Windows and the rest to Kubuntu. So appartantly I need a swap file, root, and a home partition? I have found no good guides.

    Windows format should be ntfs (not FAT32?) and Kubuntu shold be ext3? what about ext4 (better/worse?)?
    Mount point should read windows, root, swap, home? Should I have format checked?

    Windows should be in sda1? Is the order of Windows, swap, root, Kubuntu, partitioning important?
    I've read it is good to have Windows as first, and extra space at the end. Is the first partition sda1? (count upwards and not down?)
    I have 2 Gb RAM should I make my swap file 4Gb or 3 Gb?

    Should I just exit installer. Boot windows and partition once (with Gparted 60 Gb for windows/ 190Gb for Kubuntu). Exit.
    Run installer and tell it to use full 190 Gb as it wants?

    Any feedback is appreciated,

    J

  • Jonny10
    RE: Switching Over
    Hello, Thanks all for responses. I appreciate the list on Linux software that does the tasks I currently do in Windows. With regards to Kubuntu/Ubuntu - Its basically the same OS with a different GUI. The Kubuntu uses KDE where Ubunto uses GNOME. In windows I have read that you can use a USB drive as increased RAM. I do not understand how this works. Has anyone tried anything similar for Linux? Ive read that .." The 32-bit Linux kernel can be recompiled to handle up to 64GB of RAM" - Could you use an external hard drive to max that out? If that was the case then you could actually partition your hard drive and dedicate it to RAM... That seems too easy - I must be missing something. What about tweaking your TCP for faster speeds on Linux. Does anyone have any experience with this? I want to buy an extra VGA chord so I can just hijack some desktop space anytime I sit down in a computer lab. (I have 10.1" screen). Would I have to find a driver for each type of monitor I plan to use>? J
    Link to this post 16 Mar 11

    Hello,

    Thanks all for responses. I appreciate the list on Linux software that does the tasks I currently do in Windows.

    With regards to Kubuntu/Ubuntu - Its basically the same OS with a different GUI. The Kubuntu uses KDE where Ubunto uses GNOME.

    In windows I have read that you can use a USB drive as increased RAM. I do not understand how this works. Has anyone tried anything similar for Linux? Ive read that .." The 32-bit Linux kernel can be recompiled to handle up to 64GB of RAM" - Could you use an external hard drive to max that out? If that was the case then you could actually partition your hard drive and dedicate it to RAM... That seems too easy - I must be missing something.

    What about tweaking your TCP for faster speeds on Linux. Does anyone have any experience with this?

    I want to buy an extra VGA chord so I can just hijack some desktop space anytime I sit down in a computer lab. (I have 10.1" screen). Would I have to find a driver for each type of monitor I plan to use>?

    J

  • Jonny10
    RE: Switching Over
    Hello, Thanks for your response. You addressed all of my concerns. I have some more questions. I read an article suggesting that it is best to install win 7 and a distribution ( I am looking at kubuntu) as a dual boot option (partitioned hard drive) rather than uninstall windows completely and write over with a different OS. I am interested in your thoughts on this. This appeals to me because then I could just dedicate the windows partition to some tasks that may not work ideally with WINE - I am thinking ableton. In general it seems to be a more versatile solution. How would this dual boot option affect computing performance? Would start up shut down be longer? Would there be any lag on the system? I don't think there should be aside from having to make the one distinction upon boot up ( >>Windows (y/n)? ) Once an OS is choosen all of your resources are there & dedicated? I am also thinking about upgrading the windows 7 starter to home edition or ultimate. If that complicates anything. As far as file formats are concerned I don't fully understand the legal issues. MP3 & MP4, MPEG, AVI, AC3 Dolby audio filters.. are these licensed for use only under windows? Hence using emulation and not supporting directily in distribution? Web browsing under kubuntu would be the same/similar experience - ie it is able to view all web pages? What about system management. Disk defragmentation, harddrive scans, virus scans, spyware, registry, and PC speed utilities? Are these not required on a distribution? I currently use AVG anti virus, Unible registry and Speed updates on windows desktop, I perform defrag often. I understand that virus & spyware is uncommon on a distribution but is there no system manegement required? It is easy to connect a USB wireless mouse. I just have to write some code? Thanks for the thoughts! J
    Link to this post 11 Mar 11

    Hello,

    Thanks for your response. You addressed all of my concerns.

    I have some more questions. I read an article suggesting that it is best to install win 7 and a distribution ( I am looking at kubuntu) as a dual boot option (partitioned hard drive) rather than uninstall windows completely and write over with a different OS. I am interested in your thoughts on this.

    This appeals to me because then I could just dedicate the windows partition to some tasks that may not work ideally with WINE - I am thinking ableton. In general it seems to be a more versatile solution.

    How would this dual boot option affect computing performance? Would start up shut down be longer? Would there be any lag on the system? I don't think there should be aside from having to make the one distinction upon boot up ( >>Windows (y/n)? ) Once an OS is choosen all of your resources are there & dedicated?

    I am also thinking about upgrading the windows 7 starter to home edition or ultimate. If that complicates anything.

    As far as file formats are concerned I don't fully understand the legal issues. MP3 & MP4, MPEG, AVI, AC3 Dolby audio filters.. are these licensed for use only under windows? Hence using emulation and not supporting directily in distribution?

    Web browsing under kubuntu would be the same/similar experience - ie it is able to view all web pages?

    What about system management. Disk defragmentation, harddrive scans, virus scans, spyware, registry, and PC speed utilities? Are these not required on a distribution? I currently use AVG anti virus, Unible registry and Speed updates on windows desktop, I perform defrag often. I understand that virus & spyware is uncommon on a distribution but is there no system manegement required?

    It is easy to connect a USB wireless mouse. I just have to write some code?

    Thanks for the thoughts!

    J

  • Jonny10
    Switching Over
    Hello, New to the system -> have not gotten through all FAQs yet. I am buying new netbook. Am really interested in dropping win7starter and running Linux. My question is about switching everything I currently do on my desktop (WIN XP 32) and doing the tasks on Linux (on my netbook first). I am an engineering student and will use netbook for school mostly. Netbook new -1.66Gz Dual Core with 2 Gb RAM (10.1"). Running MATLab Running Power Point Online radio Watching DVD's Sharing media with my friends Connecting devices - (I have a blue tooth USB headset) Running Rosetta Stone Possibly running Ableton Live 8 Connecting to my desktop to exchange files What are some issues I can expect in the switch? I have been intereseted in Linux for a while now. I would like to get into it as there seems to have major functional advantages over Windows - like less required memory for simple tasks. If everything is smooth on Netbook I will likely install Linux on my desktop. Thanks, J J
    Link to this post 10 Mar 11

    Hello,

    New to the system -> have not gotten through all FAQs yet.

    I am buying new netbook. Am really interested in dropping win7starter and running Linux.
    My question is about switching everything I currently do on my desktop (WIN XP 32) and doing the tasks on Linux (on my netbook first). I am an engineering student and will use netbook for school mostly. Netbook new -1.66Gz Dual Core with 2 Gb RAM (10.1").

    Running MATLab
    Running Power Point
    Online radio
    Watching DVD's
    Sharing media with my friends
    Connecting devices - (I have a blue tooth USB headset)
    Running Rosetta Stone
    Possibly running Ableton Live 8
    Connecting to my desktop to exchange files

    What are some issues I can expect in the switch? I have been intereseted in Linux for a while now. I would like to get into it as there seems to have major functional advantages over Windows - like less required memory for simple tasks. If everything is smooth on Netbook I will likely install Linux on my desktop.

    Thanks,

    J
    J

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