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bminish

bminish

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  • Member Since: 14 May 09
  • Last Logged In: 23 Mar

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    RE: How to become a Linux system administrator
    There's a lot of ground to cover to become a good Linux systems administrator and there are not really any short-cuts. I would start by studying on your own for something like the LPI exams or the RHCT/RHCE. I would not rush to sit the exams but use the syllabus to help you plan your studies. The good thing about studying based on the syllabus for a certification program is that it will encourage you to spend time on the areas that perhaps you are not yet familiar with and/or haven't any direct experiences with Take the time to really understand how the pieces all fit together for a working system. Also get very comfortable with the command line, the VI editor and the man pages Get into the habit of keeping good documentation and appropriately commenting config files too. Develop a logical approach to problem solving. I would also try lots of things out. By using virtual machines you can build lots of test boxes to experiment with and break things (and you will need to break things if you strive to get good at fixing things..) Centos is a good choice to practice on as it's a very popular server distro but I would also spend time on Debian as it's also an excellent server platform. I found the Linux systems administration handbook very helpful in the beginning, my copy dates from 2002 but there is a much more up to date edition. Good Luck with your endeavours .brendan
    Link to this post 30 May 11

    There's a lot of ground to cover to become a good Linux systems administrator and there are not really any short-cuts.
    I would start by studying on your own for something like the LPI exams or the RHCT/RHCE.
    I would not rush to sit the exams but use the syllabus to help you plan your studies.

    The good thing about studying based on the syllabus for a certification program is that it will encourage you to spend time on the areas that perhaps you are not yet familiar with and/or haven't any direct experiences with

    Take the time to really understand how the pieces all fit together for a working system.
    Also get very comfortable with the command line, the VI editor and the man pages
    Get into the habit of keeping good documentation and appropriately commenting config files too.
    Develop a logical approach to problem solving.

    I would also try lots of things out. By using virtual machines you can build lots of test boxes to experiment with and break things (and you will need to break things if you strive to get good at fixing things..)
    Centos is a good choice to practice on as it's a very popular server distro but I would also spend time on Debian as it's also an excellent server platform.


    I found the Linux systems administration handbook very helpful in the beginning, my copy dates from 2002 but there is a much more up to date edition.

    Good Luck with your endeavours
    .brendan

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