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olav

olav

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  • Posts: 12
  • Member Since: 18 Jun 11
  • Last Logged In: 05 Dec

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  • olav
    Linux Store
    I was just reading up on the membership benefits for members at Linux foundation. It says: "20% Off of merchandise from the Linux.com Store, featuring cool shirts and more" Going to: http://store.linux.com/ ... I get told that the page is taken closed, but it does not say anything about for how long, or if it is permanent. If it is permanent, it should be taken off the membership benefits, but having a store can have lots of benefits. Linux.com should be an official place for most things Linux. There are several distributions that manages to have decent stores. Such a store could be a good idea to both increase income, but also to spread Linux more commercially. Although many of the t-shirts I have seen searching Google images, seems to be hard for many to relate to Linux in any way. Many were fun, some maybe a little inappropriate, but from what I manage to find, there were no Linux Foundation-line with different design approaches. Some shops: http://shop.canonical.com/ http://manjaro.org/webshop/ http://shop.opensuse.org/ http://www.linuxmint.com/store_tshirts.php The most problem I have with many of these shops is that many of the products are very dull and static. It looks too much like a company freebie if it is just a regular t-shirt with a big fat logo on top of it. One nice thing with these pages is that they only show the wearables without anyone actually in them (or at least no focus on them, the main focus is the wearables), with a clean white background. But still, there are stores that manage to make fashionable items, even fashionable and nerdy, and cool items. It could be a good place to get pens, card holders, t-shirts, and so on in bulks for stands or to give out. Or a coffee cup and pens to have at work. There could be many good opportunities in such a store, so sad if it is closed for good.
    Link to this post 08 Oct 13

    I was just reading up on the membership benefits for members at Linux foundation. It says:

    "20% Off of merchandise from the Linux.com Store, featuring cool shirts and more"

    Going to:
    http://store.linux.com/

    ... I get told that the page is taken closed, but it does not say anything about for how long, or if it is permanent.

    If it is permanent, it should be taken off the membership benefits, but having a store can have lots of benefits. Linux.com should be an official place for most things Linux.

    There are several distributions that manages to have decent stores. Such a store could be a good idea to both increase income, but also to spread Linux more commercially. Although many of the t-shirts I have seen searching Google images, seems to be hard for many to relate to Linux in any way. Many were fun, some maybe a little inappropriate, but from what I manage to find, there were no Linux Foundation-line with different design approaches.

    Some shops:
    http://shop.canonical.com/
    http://manjaro.org/webshop/
    http://shop.opensuse.org/
    http://www.linuxmint.com/store_tshirts.php

    The most problem I have with many of these shops is that many of the products are very dull and static. It looks too much like a company freebie if it is just a regular t-shirt with a big fat logo on top of it. One nice thing with these pages is that they only show the wearables without anyone actually in them (or at least no focus on them, the main focus is the wearables), with a clean white background.

    But still, there are stores that manage to make fashionable items, even fashionable and nerdy, and cool items. It could be a good place to get pens, card holders, t-shirts, and so on in bulks for stands or to give out. Or a coffee cup and pens to have at work.

    There could be many good opportunities in such a store, so sad if it is closed for good.

  • olav
    RE: Economically supporting fre software
    [b]@mfillpot:[/b] Thank you. I don't have too high hopes though, but would be interesting to see how this could affect economical growth for different projects if it got through somehow. [b]@crond:[/b] I think it would be near impossible to add individuals to such a listing, but many projects needs an income to survive or progress. If you pay to all projects from one page, nothing stops you from donating from another page. And if they deserves a donation for their work, it should be the same if they visit their page to donate or donated through another page. I don't know how many I would speak for saying this, but I would most definitely find it easier to pay to more projects, and would more than likely put up monthly donations, if it was made easy and convenient for me to do so.
    Link to this post 08 Oct 13

    @mfillpot:
    Thank you. I don't have too high hopes though, but would be interesting to see how this could affect economical growth for different projects if it got through somehow.

    @crond:
    I think it would be near impossible to add individuals to such a listing, but many projects needs an income to survive or progress.

    If you pay to all projects from one page, nothing stops you from donating from another page. And if they deserves a donation for their work, it should be the same if they visit their page to donate or donated through another page.

    I don't know how many I would speak for saying this, but I would most definitely find it easier to pay to more projects, and would more than likely put up monthly donations, if it was made easy and convenient for me to do so.

  • olav
    RE: Economically supporting fre software
    The money would/could probably be forwarded from a found at Linux Foundation, and not directly. Sending the donation in bunches and exclude the amount for their "fees/donations". Linux Foundation would need an income from this to be able to pay the cost, and I would not mind some of the amount going straight to them, since they are an important organization for the Linux community. Are there a place you can post ideas like this where it goes to a progress of positive/negative feedback, and if it is doable or not? The closest thing I could think of was these forums. I do believe many more people that do want to contribute economically, this would make it a lot easier to contribute, as well as contribute to several projects, not having to donate several times.
    Link to this post 03 Oct 13

    The money would/could probably be forwarded from a found at Linux Foundation, and not directly. Sending the donation in bunches and exclude the amount for their "fees/donations". Linux Foundation would need an income from this to be able to pay the cost, and I would not mind some of the amount going straight to them, since they are an important organization for the Linux community.

    Are there a place you can post ideas like this where it goes to a progress of positive/negative feedback, and if it is doable or not? The closest thing I could think of was these forums.

    I do believe many more people that do want to contribute economically, this would make it a lot easier to contribute, as well as contribute to several projects, not having to donate several times.

  • olav
    RE: Native support for ATI and nVidia, best choice today?
    Have to say the same. My first computer when I moved to Linux for many years ago, had ATI. It was a mess, and I changed to nVidia. After that ATI was totally out of the picture. I never had any problems with nVidia or Intel, not much problem with Intel even when they rewrote their driver either that seemed to cause some annoyances. However, with this last laptop, it is far from as straight forward it was/is with nVidia without Optimus. I am not sure which way to go now, although I still holds a finger towards nVidia due to their native support compared to ATI and performance compared to Intel. But, it seems to be a lot going on with AMD/ATI and nVidia considering Steam focusing on Linux. Also, nVidia has met a lot of critics from the community, and lost some big business agreements because of the lack of open drivers in China. So I feel the best might be to wait, and pay attention to which of the companies would provide the best drivers, both open and closed. A lot has happened since I had problems with ATI, so they might have gotten better with 3D performance in Linux, a couple of days ago they released a bunch of 3D GPU documentation as well. And I have never had any problems with Intel, and with the Iris Pro serie, it seems that they are getting closer to some decent graphical performance.
    Link to this post 03 Oct 13

    Have to say the same. My first computer when I moved to Linux for many years ago, had ATI. It was a mess, and I changed to nVidia. After that ATI was totally out of the picture.

    I never had any problems with nVidia or Intel, not much problem with Intel even when they rewrote their driver either that seemed to cause some annoyances.

    However, with this last laptop, it is far from as straight forward it was/is with nVidia without Optimus.

    I am not sure which way to go now, although I still holds a finger towards nVidia due to their native support compared to ATI and performance compared to Intel.

    But, it seems to be a lot going on with AMD/ATI and nVidia considering Steam focusing on Linux. Also, nVidia has met a lot of critics from the community, and lost some big business agreements because of the lack of open drivers in China.

    So I feel the best might be to wait, and pay attention to which of the companies would provide the best drivers, both open and closed. A lot has happened since I had problems with ATI, so they might have gotten better with 3D performance in Linux, a couple of days ago they released a bunch of 3D GPU documentation as well. And I have never had any problems with Intel, and with the Iris Pro serie, it seems that they are getting closer to some decent graphical performance.

  • olav
    Economically supporting fre software
    I wish there was some easier way to donate money to FOSS projects I like to use. Now, I could go to linuxmint, donate some money there, then to Gimp, then to Gnome, and so on. But it would be very handy to be able to do something like this from one place, like the Linux Foundation. Say I want to donate some money to different FOSS projects, it would be really handy to be able to do something like this: ---------- [$25] KDE [$50] Mint [$10] Gimp [___] ( V add more) *10% goes to Linux Foundation [_] I want to make this a monthly donation Choose payment method [VISA] [Paypal] (Edit your monthly donation.) ---------- Is this something that would be way to hard to implement because of the effort, many small projects, and where to set a "cut" to who is allowed to be on such a list, etc.?
    Link to this post 01 Oct 13

    I wish there was some easier way to donate money to FOSS projects I like to use. Now, I could go to linuxmint, donate some money there, then to Gimp, then to Gnome, and so on. But it would be very handy to be able to do something like this from one place, like the Linux Foundation.

    Say I want to donate some money to different FOSS projects, it would be really handy to be able to do something like this:

    ----------
    [$25] KDE
    [$50] Mint
    [$10] Gimp
    [___] ( V add more)
    *10% goes to Linux Foundation

    [_] I want to make this a monthly donation

    Choose payment method [VISA] [Paypal]

    (Edit your monthly donation.)
    ----------

    Is this something that would be way to hard to implement because of the effort, many small projects, and where to set a "cut" to who is allowed to be on such a list, etc.?

  • olav
    Native support for ATI and nVidia, best choice today?
    I have usually chosen nVidia for my GPUs, but on my latest laptop with Optimus, it has been nothing but a hassle to get it to work. I just want something that is easy and fast to set up and works decent for gaming.
    Link to this post 01 Oct 13

    I have usually chosen nVidia for my GPUs, but on my latest laptop with Optimus, it has been nothing but a hassle to get it to work.

    I just want something that is easy and fast to set up and works decent for gaming.

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