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olav

olav

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  • Posts: 12
  • Member Since: 18 Jun 11
  • Last Logged In: 05 Dec

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  • olav
    RE: Economically supporting fre software
    Something like this, only maybe a little better organized: https://co.clickandpledge.com/advanced/default.aspx?wid=34115# There is a $40 minimum for monthly donations, you have to decide the time period as you donate (maximum a year), does not seem to have any edit options, etc.
    Link to this post 27 Dec 13

    Something like this, only maybe a little better organized:

    https://co.clickandpledge.com/advanced/default.aspx?wid=34115#

    There is a $40 minimum for monthly donations, you have to decide the time period as you donate (maximum a year), does not seem to have any edit options, etc.

  • olav
    RE: Linux Store
    That is what I have ended up doing. Except when the artwork is licensed under a LGPL, GPL, CC, etc. license that grants anyone the rights to share and remix. The only thing that is kind of iffy is the attribution part: "– You must attribute the work in the manner specified by the author or licensor (but not in any way that suggests that they endorse you or your use of the work)." Many distributions have their artwork released under this license, and should for most of the part be OK to use. Nevertheless, as long as you do not use any artwork with any negative intentions, most of these distributions would probably want their community to do these kind of things. This goes for [b]Manjaro, Sabayon, Gentoo, and several others[/b]. Not that would want to make a t-shirt with every distributions that is out there (Arch and Debian is two distributions I highly respect, and some other artwork is somewhat known and looks nice), but it made me curious to see what kind of policies the distributions have for use of their trademarks. As I would believe that creators would want their community to spread walk around with commercial for free to spread their work, it seems to be harder than it should be for some instances, but that most distributions have strict guidelines is understandable. However, community creativity and openness seems to not always follow the open source ideology of GNU/Linux, as I would expect in a higher degree than what it seems. Often, remixes as long as it resembles the original logo, and colors to match color of the t-shirt (or if you prefer colors of your own likings), and in no disrespectful manner could but a personal feel to the products, and I can not see how this can harm a distribution. Although I can see how it can feel daunting to give this much freedom to use trademarks for many purposes. Some of them have very useful information on what you are allowed to do and not. Considering if you are allowed to use for these intentions. For example, the: [b]Arch[/b] Linux says that logo for personal usage is perfectly fine, and that it is covered under Fair Use . Their trademark say this however (as I read today): https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/DeveloperWiki:TrademarkPolicy "Restricted use that requires a trademark license Use for merchandising purposes, e.g. on t-shirts and the like." Commercial use is already covered in the list, if this was regarding use, it should already be covered, so I would interpret that as a general rule for both non-commercial and commercial use. I am not from an English speaking country, so might not have the correct understanding of the word, but this is Google's definition: "the activity of promoting the sale of goods, esp. by their presentation in retail outlets." In this case it would not be promoting sales of Arch Linux, since it is free. [b]Debian[/b] have information about use of their logo on these two pages: http://www.debian.org/News/2013/20130301 "Debian logos and marks may now be used freely for both non-commercial and commercial purposes." but here: http://www.debian.org/trademark "You can make t-shirts, desktop wallpapers, caps, or other merchandise with Debian trademarks for non-commercial usage." However, it is released under English under a LGPLv3 or later, or if you want, CC BY-SA 3.0, and a stylized word “debian”, which is apparently not copyrightable. Meaning that it should be OK to use this logo also with slightly altering the image, at least for personal use. The [b]OpenSuse[/b] logo have very specific rules on colors, placement of logo and text, font, etc. But their Geeko logo can have its own colors, and be altered. http://en.opensuse.org/openSUSE:Artwork_brand They also give this information: You are welcome to make use of the openSUSE Marks to produce merchandise such as t-shirts, hats, bags, jackets, sweatshirts, mugs, and desktop wallpapers and give them to your friends, family, community members, provided there is no commercial interest behind it. You have to request permission if you want to commercially distribute articles using the openSUSE Marks (see "Contact Information" below to request permission). http://en.opensuse.org/openSUSE:Trademark_guidelines As well as: http://en.opensuse.org/openSUSE:Artwork_t-shirts [b]Fedora[/b] requires permission: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Legal:Trademark_guidelines Usage That Requires Permission Non-software goods "Community members may request from the Fedora Board a license to use the Fedora trademarks on non-software related goods, services, or other entities. The Board, or someone it delegates for the task, will ask to see the proposed designs before approving the use." http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Legal:Trademark_guidelines http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Logo/UsageGuidelines [b]Ubuntu[/b] also seems to have strict rules regarding colors and alignment: http://design.ubuntu.com/brand/ubuntu-logo And I would also need a written agreement for use of their logo in this manner.
    Link to this post 13 Nov 13

    That is what I have ended up doing. Except when the artwork is licensed under a LGPL, GPL, CC, etc. license that grants anyone the rights to share and remix. The only thing that is kind of iffy is the attribution part:
    "– You must attribute the work in the manner specified by the author or licensor (but not in any way that suggests that they endorse you or your use of the work)."

    Many distributions have their artwork released under this license, and should for most of the part be OK to use. Nevertheless, as long as you do not use any artwork with any negative intentions, most of these distributions would probably want their community to do these kind of things.

    This goes for Manjaro, Sabayon, Gentoo, and several others.

    Not that would want to make a t-shirt with every distributions that is out there (Arch and Debian is two distributions I highly respect, and some other artwork is somewhat known and looks nice), but it made me curious to see what kind of policies the distributions have for use of their trademarks. As I would believe that creators would want their community to spread walk around with commercial for free to spread their work, it seems to be harder than it should be for some instances, but that most distributions have strict guidelines is understandable.

    However, community creativity and openness seems to not always follow the open source ideology of GNU/Linux, as I would expect in a higher degree than what it seems. Often, remixes as long as it resembles the original logo, and colors to match color of the t-shirt (or if you prefer colors of your own likings), and in no disrespectful manner could but a personal feel to the products, and I can not see how this can harm a distribution. Although I can see how it can feel daunting to give this much freedom to use trademarks for many purposes.

    Some of them have very useful information on what you are allowed to do and not. Considering if you are allowed to use for these intentions. For example, the:

    Arch Linux says that logo for personal usage is perfectly fine, and that it is covered under Fair Use . Their trademark say this however (as I read today):
    https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/DeveloperWiki:TrademarkPolicy
    "Restricted use that requires a trademark license
    Use for merchandising purposes, e.g. on t-shirts and the like."
    Commercial use is already covered in the list, if this was regarding use, it should already be covered, so I would interpret that as a general rule for both non-commercial and commercial use. I am not from an English speaking country, so might not have the correct understanding of the word, but this is Google's definition:
    "the activity of promoting the sale of goods, esp. by their presentation in retail outlets."
    In this case it would not be promoting sales of Arch Linux, since it is free.

    Debian have information about use of their logo on these two pages:
    http://www.debian.org/News/2013/20130301
    "Debian logos and marks may now be used freely for both non-commercial and commercial purposes."

    but here:
    http://www.debian.org/trademark
    "You can make t-shirts, desktop wallpapers, caps, or other merchandise with Debian trademarks for non-commercial usage."

    However, it is released under English under a LGPLv3 or later, or if you want, CC BY-SA 3.0, and a stylized word “debian”, which is apparently not copyrightable. Meaning that it should be OK to use this logo also with slightly altering the image, at least for personal use.

    The OpenSuse logo have very specific rules on colors, placement of logo and text, font, etc. But their Geeko logo can have its own colors, and be altered.
    http://en.opensuse.org/openSUSE:Artwork_brand

    They also give this information:
    You are welcome to make use of the openSUSE Marks to produce merchandise such as t-shirts, hats, bags, jackets, sweatshirts, mugs, and desktop wallpapers and give them to your friends, family, community members, provided there is no commercial interest behind it. You have to request permission if you want to commercially distribute articles using the openSUSE Marks (see "Contact Information" below to request permission).
    http://en.opensuse.org/openSUSE:Trademark_guidelines

    As well as:
    http://en.opensuse.org/openSUSE:Artwork_t-shirts

    Fedora requires permission:
    http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Legal:Trademark_guidelines
    Usage That Requires Permission
    Non-software goods
    "Community members may request from the Fedora Board a license to use the Fedora trademarks on non-software related goods, services, or other entities. The Board, or someone it delegates for the task, will ask to see the proposed designs before approving the use."
    http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Legal:Trademark_guidelines
    http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Logo/UsageGuidelines

    Ubuntu also seems to have strict rules regarding colors and alignment:
    http://design.ubuntu.com/brand/ubuntu-logo
    And I would also need a written agreement for use of their logo in this manner.

  • olav
    RE: Linux Store
    I have a question regarding legal rights for use of logos from different distributions. Can I upload and use logos from Red Hat, Arch, Ubuntu, Debian, and so on and print t-shirts for non-commercial use without asking every owners of the distributions? For example, Red Hat seems to have a very strict policy for use of their shadowman logo, and it seems that it would not be legal to use it just for personal use in any way.
    Link to this post 12 Nov 13

    I have a question regarding legal rights for use of logos from different distributions.

    Can I upload and use logos from Red Hat, Arch, Ubuntu, Debian, and so on and print t-shirts for non-commercial use without asking every owners of the distributions?

    For example, Red Hat seems to have a very strict policy for use of their shadowman logo, and it seems that it would not be legal to use it just for personal use in any way.

  • olav
    RE: Economically supporting fre software
    Will there be any updates about about this being possible or not, and a discussion if it can be beneficial or not?
    Link to this post 12 Nov 13

    Will there be any updates about about this being possible or not, and a discussion if it can be beneficial or not?

  • olav
    RE: Linux Store
    It seems to be possible to create an own store in many of these sites. As well as add artwork and get a small amount of money whenever they are used.
    Link to this post 21 Oct 13

    It seems to be possible to create an own store in many of these sites. As well as add artwork and get a small amount of money whenever they are used.

  • olav
    RE: Linux Store
    So is it taken down for good or undergoing bigger changes? [url=http://store.linux.com/]The closed store[/url] could maybe have some more information about why it is closed, and if it is closed for good; how to obtain wearables or other items, either through other stores, or custom t-shirt services. Although it wont be much income from that, it would still contribute to the community and spread the awareness of Linux in general. [b][size=125]Custom apparel services[/size][/b] It sure made me search the web for a good quality custom t-shirt provider. Has gotten the number down to 5 from a list of probably 15 that seems to have good quality :) That is: [list] [*] [url=http://www.customink.com/]CustomInk[/url] [*] [url=http://www.designashirt.com/]DesignAShirt[/url] [*] [url=http://www.uberprints.com/]Uberprint[/url] [*] [url=http://www.shirtinator.co.uk/]Shirtinator[/url] (seems to be limited to a big range of countries in EU) [*] [url=http://www.spreadshirt.com/]Spreadshirt[/url] [/list] It is hard to find any information about how the print looks after several washes, and Spreadshirt the only one that seems reach out to most parts of the world, so might be my best option. If anyone have any experience with any of these services, I would be glad to hear :) Btw, some of these services lets you make an account and add artwork that will be reachable to everyone that wants to make their own designs on any clothes or other items they may have.
    Link to this post 17 Oct 13

    So is it taken down for good or undergoing bigger changes?

    The closed store could maybe have some more information about why it is closed, and if it is closed for good; how to obtain wearables or other items, either through other stores, or custom t-shirt services. Although it wont be much income from that, it would still contribute to the community and spread the awareness of Linux in general.

    Custom apparel services
    It sure made me search the web for a good quality custom t-shirt provider. Has gotten the number down to 5 from a list of probably 15 that seems to have good quality :) That is:

    It is hard to find any information about how the print looks after several washes, and Spreadshirt the only one that seems reach out to most parts of the world, so might be my best option. If anyone have any experience with any of these services, I would be glad to hear :)

    Btw, some of these services lets you make an account and add artwork that will be reachable to everyone that wants to make their own designs on any clothes or other items they may have.

  • olav
    Linux Store
    I was just reading up on the membership benefits for members at Linux foundation. It says: "20% Off of merchandise from the Linux.com Store, featuring cool shirts and more" Going to: http://store.linux.com/ ... I get told that the page is taken closed, but it does not say anything about for how long, or if it is permanent. If it is permanent, it should be taken off the membership benefits, but having a store can have lots of benefits. Linux.com should be an official place for most things Linux. There are several distributions that manages to have decent stores. Such a store could be a good idea to both increase income, but also to spread Linux more commercially. Although many of the t-shirts I have seen searching Google images, seems to be hard for many to relate to Linux in any way. Many were fun, some maybe a little inappropriate, but from what I manage to find, there were no Linux Foundation-line with different design approaches. Some shops: http://shop.canonical.com/ http://manjaro.org/webshop/ http://shop.opensuse.org/ http://www.linuxmint.com/store_tshirts.php The most problem I have with many of these shops is that many of the products are very dull and static. It looks too much like a company freebie if it is just a regular t-shirt with a big fat logo on top of it. One nice thing with these pages is that they only show the wearables without anyone actually in them (or at least no focus on them, the main focus is the wearables), with a clean white background. But still, there are stores that manage to make fashionable items, even fashionable and nerdy, and cool items. It could be a good place to get pens, card holders, t-shirts, and so on in bulks for stands or to give out. Or a coffee cup and pens to have at work. There could be many good opportunities in such a store, so sad if it is closed for good.
    Link to this post 08 Oct 13

    I was just reading up on the membership benefits for members at Linux foundation. It says:

    "20% Off of merchandise from the Linux.com Store, featuring cool shirts and more"

    Going to:
    http://store.linux.com/

    ... I get told that the page is taken closed, but it does not say anything about for how long, or if it is permanent.

    If it is permanent, it should be taken off the membership benefits, but having a store can have lots of benefits. Linux.com should be an official place for most things Linux.

    There are several distributions that manages to have decent stores. Such a store could be a good idea to both increase income, but also to spread Linux more commercially. Although many of the t-shirts I have seen searching Google images, seems to be hard for many to relate to Linux in any way. Many were fun, some maybe a little inappropriate, but from what I manage to find, there were no Linux Foundation-line with different design approaches.

    Some shops:
    http://shop.canonical.com/
    http://manjaro.org/webshop/
    http://shop.opensuse.org/
    http://www.linuxmint.com/store_tshirts.php

    The most problem I have with many of these shops is that many of the products are very dull and static. It looks too much like a company freebie if it is just a regular t-shirt with a big fat logo on top of it. One nice thing with these pages is that they only show the wearables without anyone actually in them (or at least no focus on them, the main focus is the wearables), with a clean white background.

    But still, there are stores that manage to make fashionable items, even fashionable and nerdy, and cool items. It could be a good place to get pens, card holders, t-shirts, and so on in bulks for stands or to give out. Or a coffee cup and pens to have at work.

    There could be many good opportunities in such a store, so sad if it is closed for good.

  • olav
    RE: Economically supporting fre software
    [b]@mfillpot:[/b] Thank you. I don't have too high hopes though, but would be interesting to see how this could affect economical growth for different projects if it got through somehow. [b]@crond:[/b] I think it would be near impossible to add individuals to such a listing, but many projects needs an income to survive or progress. If you pay to all projects from one page, nothing stops you from donating from another page. And if they deserves a donation for their work, it should be the same if they visit their page to donate or donated through another page. I don't know how many I would speak for saying this, but I would most definitely find it easier to pay to more projects, and would more than likely put up monthly donations, if it was made easy and convenient for me to do so.
    Link to this post 08 Oct 13

    @mfillpot:
    Thank you. I don't have too high hopes though, but would be interesting to see how this could affect economical growth for different projects if it got through somehow.

    @crond:
    I think it would be near impossible to add individuals to such a listing, but many projects needs an income to survive or progress.

    If you pay to all projects from one page, nothing stops you from donating from another page. And if they deserves a donation for their work, it should be the same if they visit their page to donate or donated through another page.

    I don't know how many I would speak for saying this, but I would most definitely find it easier to pay to more projects, and would more than likely put up monthly donations, if it was made easy and convenient for me to do so.

  • olav
    RE: Economically supporting fre software
    The money would/could probably be forwarded from a found at Linux Foundation, and not directly. Sending the donation in bunches and exclude the amount for their "fees/donations". Linux Foundation would need an income from this to be able to pay the cost, and I would not mind some of the amount going straight to them, since they are an important organization for the Linux community. Are there a place you can post ideas like this where it goes to a progress of positive/negative feedback, and if it is doable or not? The closest thing I could think of was these forums. I do believe many more people that do want to contribute economically, this would make it a lot easier to contribute, as well as contribute to several projects, not having to donate several times.
    Link to this post 03 Oct 13

    The money would/could probably be forwarded from a found at Linux Foundation, and not directly. Sending the donation in bunches and exclude the amount for their "fees/donations". Linux Foundation would need an income from this to be able to pay the cost, and I would not mind some of the amount going straight to them, since they are an important organization for the Linux community.

    Are there a place you can post ideas like this where it goes to a progress of positive/negative feedback, and if it is doable or not? The closest thing I could think of was these forums.

    I do believe many more people that do want to contribute economically, this would make it a lot easier to contribute, as well as contribute to several projects, not having to donate several times.

  • olav
    RE: Native support for ATI and nVidia, best choice today?
    Have to say the same. My first computer when I moved to Linux for many years ago, had ATI. It was a mess, and I changed to nVidia. After that ATI was totally out of the picture. I never had any problems with nVidia or Intel, not much problem with Intel even when they rewrote their driver either that seemed to cause some annoyances. However, with this last laptop, it is far from as straight forward it was/is with nVidia without Optimus. I am not sure which way to go now, although I still holds a finger towards nVidia due to their native support compared to ATI and performance compared to Intel. But, it seems to be a lot going on with AMD/ATI and nVidia considering Steam focusing on Linux. Also, nVidia has met a lot of critics from the community, and lost some big business agreements because of the lack of open drivers in China. So I feel the best might be to wait, and pay attention to which of the companies would provide the best drivers, both open and closed. A lot has happened since I had problems with ATI, so they might have gotten better with 3D performance in Linux, a couple of days ago they released a bunch of 3D GPU documentation as well. And I have never had any problems with Intel, and with the Iris Pro serie, it seems that they are getting closer to some decent graphical performance.
    Link to this post 03 Oct 13

    Have to say the same. My first computer when I moved to Linux for many years ago, had ATI. It was a mess, and I changed to nVidia. After that ATI was totally out of the picture.

    I never had any problems with nVidia or Intel, not much problem with Intel even when they rewrote their driver either that seemed to cause some annoyances.

    However, with this last laptop, it is far from as straight forward it was/is with nVidia without Optimus.

    I am not sure which way to go now, although I still holds a finger towards nVidia due to their native support compared to ATI and performance compared to Intel.

    But, it seems to be a lot going on with AMD/ATI and nVidia considering Steam focusing on Linux. Also, nVidia has met a lot of critics from the community, and lost some big business agreements because of the lack of open drivers in China.

    So I feel the best might be to wait, and pay attention to which of the companies would provide the best drivers, both open and closed. A lot has happened since I had problems with ATI, so they might have gotten better with 3D performance in Linux, a couple of days ago they released a bunch of 3D GPU documentation as well. And I have never had any problems with Intel, and with the Iris Pro serie, it seems that they are getting closer to some decent graphical performance.

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