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HyperInferno

HyperInferno

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  • Posts: 2
  • Member Since: 02 Sep 11
  • Last Logged In: 02 Sep 11

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  • HyperInferno
    RE: How to become a Linux system administrator
    I learned via the book "practical unix" by Steve Moritsugu. Its an excellent book. Although I might have had a slight advantage in that Steve Moritsugu was also my professor. It was actually a rather enlightening exchange with him, since although he quite literally "wrote the book" on using the terminal, he never actually bothered with any of the Linux GUI enviroments. So we had some good back and forth, he ended up learning from me about all GUI based stuff. Which leads me to a good way on how to learn to use linux/unix. His teaching method, was he had an HPUX server set up at the school. He then gave each of us an account, and taught us how to install putty on our machines at home (or since I was already on linux, I got to install openssh instead). From there, he said "ok, we've learned how to move files about, make directories and such today, for your homework, I have dumped a bunch of files into your home folders on your accounts. You need to make directories for various months and sort the files into the directories based on creation date. Bonus points if you create a script to do it for you" Later tests would be similar things, just "hey make a script that does this. I don't care what language you do it in, bash, python, perl, whatever. Just make it do this action". As a result of this, I found myself learning the terminal, and do more and more common tasks there, righting scripts for things here and there. So my suggestion, is to just start doing tasks you normally wouldn't do, on the terminal. Rather then drag and drop those files to another folder, run a cp command. Setting up some folders? Hope on the terminal and use mkdir. Need to rename a bunch of files in a folder so they are each numbered in order? Make a little batch script with a nice for loop.
    Link to this post 03 Sep 11

    I learned via the book "practical unix" by Steve Moritsugu. Its an excellent book. Although I might have had a slight advantage in that Steve Moritsugu was also my professor. It was actually a rather enlightening exchange with him, since although he quite literally "wrote the book" on using the terminal, he never actually bothered with any of the Linux GUI enviroments. So we had some good back and forth, he ended up learning from me about all GUI based stuff.

    Which leads me to a good way on how to learn to use linux/unix.

    His teaching method, was he had an HPUX server set up at the school. He then gave each of us an account, and taught us how to install putty on our machines at home (or since I was already on linux, I got to install openssh instead). From there, he said "ok, we've learned how to move files about, make directories and such today, for your homework, I have dumped a bunch of files into your home folders on your accounts. You need to make directories for various months and sort the files into the directories based on creation date. Bonus points if you create a script to do it for you"

    Later tests would be similar things, just "hey make a script that does this. I don't care what language you do it in, bash, python, perl, whatever. Just make it do this action".

    As a result of this, I found myself learning the terminal, and do more and more common tasks there, righting scripts for things here and there. So my suggestion, is to just start doing tasks you normally wouldn't do, on the terminal. Rather then drag and drop those files to another folder, run a cp command. Setting up some folders? Hope on the terminal and use mkdir. Need to rename a bunch of files in a folder so they are each numbered in order? Make a little batch script with a nice for loop.

  • HyperInferno
    RE: Collectively buy games to open source?
    What would be better is to find a way to make it self-funding. My thought is this, I can't remember which group did it, but one band offered one of their albums to be downloaded for free off their website. But rather then simply make it free, they made it so you could buy it for whatever price you entered in, even 0. So while you could indeed get it for free, a vast majority of people still tossed in 10-15 bucks. Similar thing, source code is freely available. Game can be freely distributed. But the binary download section, you put in a little section where there is a little radio button. one option, is just to freely download. The other option, is to download, and donate a little while you are at it. End result, its free as in freedom, but you manage to keep the project financially afloat via guilt tripping.
    Link to this post 03 Sep 11

    What would be better is to find a way to make it self-funding.

    My thought is this, I can't remember which group did it, but one band offered one of their albums to be downloaded for free off their website. But rather then simply make it free, they made it so you could buy it for whatever price you entered in, even 0. So while you could indeed get it for free, a vast majority of people still tossed in 10-15 bucks.

    Similar thing, source code is freely available. Game can be freely distributed. But the binary download section, you put in a little section where there is a little radio button. one option, is just to freely download. The other option, is to download, and donate a little while you are at it.

    End result, its free as in freedom, but you manage to keep the project financially afloat via guilt tripping.

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