Linux.com

samjh

samjh

  • Linux.com Member
  • Posts: 5
  • Member Since: 19 May 09
  • Last Logged In: 02 Feb 10

Latest Posts

Posted by
Topic
Post Preview
Posted
  • samjh
    RE: Linux.com Groups
    Yep. Also, the distro-specific forums could be condensed as well. At the moment there is very little activity and a lot of fragmentation. OpenSUSE and SUSE Enterprise can be merged, as should Fedora and Red Hat. I also find it odd that there are forums for Slackware, MEPIS, and Mandriva, but none for Arch, PCLinuxOS, or Gentoo. Perhaps the distro-specific forums should be all integrated into one "Distribution Discussion" forum until the most active distributions can be identified and branched off into its forum (so far only Ubuntu and the Fedora/RH forums seem really active). The Software section has some duplications. For instance, the Productivity forum doesn't really have a role. Productivity software can be either command-line or desktop. It might be better to rearrange the Software section into Administration, Office, Entertainment, and Other. The Installation forum is unnecessary: if it's a distro installation issue, it can be discussed in a distro-specific forum; if it's software packaging issue, it can be discussed in one of the other software forums. Same with Hardware. Multimedia, Printers and Scanners, Networking, and Storage forums should serve until activity picks up. Just IMHO.
    Link to this post 23 May 09

    Yep. Also, the distro-specific forums could be condensed as well. At the moment there is very little activity and a lot of fragmentation. OpenSUSE and SUSE Enterprise can be merged, as should Fedora and Red Hat. I also find it odd that there are forums for Slackware, MEPIS, and Mandriva, but none for Arch, PCLinuxOS, or Gentoo. Perhaps the distro-specific forums should be all integrated into one "Distribution Discussion" forum until the most active distributions can be identified and branched off into its forum (so far only Ubuntu and the Fedora/RH forums seem really active).

    The Software section has some duplications. For instance, the Productivity forum doesn't really have a role. Productivity software can be either command-line or desktop. It might be better to rearrange the Software section into Administration, Office, Entertainment, and Other. The Installation forum is unnecessary: if it's a distro installation issue, it can be discussed in a distro-specific forum; if it's software packaging issue, it can be discussed in one of the other software forums.

    Same with Hardware. Multimedia, Printers and Scanners, Networking, and Storage forums should serve until activity picks up.

    Just IMHO.

  • samjh
    RE: Haskell vs. C++
    [b]Ormaaj wrote:[/b] [quote]That is a horrible comparison. It really depends upon how the code is written. Highly optimized C will have a tendency to be faster than GHC, but there are many notable exceptions. Compilers for functional languages have been really pushing ahead as far as automatic code optimization.[/quote] "Notable exceptions" are irrelevant. He is talking about basic performance differences generally observable between the two languages, not specific performance differences in specialised problem domains. Haskell is a niche language, not a general purpose language. It is also an interpreted language, which are generally much slower than compiled languages. Again, exceptions need not apply. We're talking about general performance characteristics. The benchmark I linked to is not authoritative. But I do not know of any other cross-language benchmark which uses: open-source compilers and interpreters, transparent testing methods and algorithms, well-known algorithms, and algorithms that are fully language-agnostic. For the purposes of basic, generalised performance comparisons between languages, it is a reasonably good benchmark. If a user wants to compare performance differences within a specific problem domain, they'll need to perform benchmark tests themselves.
    Link to this post 22 May 09

    Ormaaj wrote:

    That is a horrible comparison. It really depends upon how the code is written. Highly optimized C will have a tendency to be faster than GHC, but there are many notable exceptions. Compilers for functional languages have been really pushing ahead as far as automatic code optimization.

    "Notable exceptions" are irrelevant. He is talking about basic performance differences generally observable between the two languages, not specific performance differences in specialised problem domains.

    Haskell is a niche language, not a general purpose language. It is also an interpreted language, which are generally much slower than compiled languages. Again, exceptions need not apply. We're talking about general performance characteristics.

    The benchmark I linked to is not authoritative. But I do not know of any other cross-language benchmark which uses: open-source compilers and interpreters, transparent testing methods and algorithms, well-known algorithms, and algorithms that are fully language-agnostic. For the purposes of basic, generalised performance comparisons between languages, it is a reasonably good benchmark. If a user wants to compare performance differences within a specific problem domain, they'll need to perform benchmark tests themselves.

  • samjh
    RE: Haskell vs. C++
    http://shootout.alioth.debian.org/u32q/benchmark.php?test=all&lang=gpp&lang2=ghc&box=1 According to those benchmarks, C++ is up to 5 times faster, and uses as little as quarter of the memory compared to Haskell.
    Link to this post 21 May 09

    http://shootout.alioth.debian.org/u32q/benchmark.php?test=all&lang=gpp&lang2=ghc&box=1

    According to those benchmarks, C++ is up to 5 times faster, and uses as little as quarter of the memory compared to Haskell.

  • samjh
    RE: echo in other platform
    Echo is quite universal across distros. I doubt there are any differences between Debian, RHEL, or whatever else. If there are any differences, they probably won't be anything notable to the end-user.
    Link to this post 19 May 09

    Echo is quite universal across distros. I doubt there are any differences between Debian, RHEL, or whatever else. If there are any differences, they probably won't be anything notable to the end-user.

  • samjh
    RE: Phishing attempt at Linux.com
    This would probably be the second attack against high-profile Linux websites recently. First was Debian Forums, and now here. Definitely worth reporting to the admins. Nice catch. :)
    Link to this post 19 May 09

    This would probably be the second attack against high-profile Linux websites recently. First was Debian Forums, and now here.

    Definitely worth reporting to the admins.

    Nice catch. :)

Who we are ?

The Linux Foundation is a non-profit consortium dedicated to the growth of Linux.

More About the foundation...

Frequent Questions

Join / Linux Training / Board