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vonbiber

vonbiber

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  • Posts: 28
  • Member Since: 19 May 09
  • Last Logged In: 20 May 12

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  • vonbiber
    RE: How to Build a Slackware Package
    A while ago I wrote a slackbuild generator that creates a skeleton slackbuild. I use it whenever I need to build a slackware package from source. If the building follow the classic [code] ./configure make make install ... [/code] there are just minor adjustments to make, and the slackbuild is ready to use. What I always do is 1. unpack the sources 2. read the INSTALL, README, ... to check for specific install directives 3. also check the Makefiles, etc., (see if DESTDIR, or something similar is used)... Sometimes you need to tweak some files (Makefile, source files, ...) 4. I proceed step by step: see if the configuration part worked ok, then 'make ', etc. I posted the script here: http://vonbiber.byethost17.com/slackware/index.html
    Link to this post 09 Apr 11

    A while ago I wrote a slackbuild generator that creates a skeleton slackbuild.
    I use it whenever I need to build a slackware package from source.
    If the building follow the classic


    ./configure
    make
    make install ...

    there are just minor adjustments to make, and the slackbuild is ready to use.
    What I always do is
    1. unpack the sources
    2. read the INSTALL, README, ... to check for specific install directives
    3. also check the Makefiles, etc., (see if DESTDIR, or something similar is used)...
    Sometimes you need to tweak some files (Makefile, source files, ...)
    4. I proceed step by step: see if the configuration part worked ok, then 'make ', etc.

    I posted the script here:
    http://vonbiber.byethost17.com/slackware/index.html

  • vonbiber
    RE: iso
    I installed slackware from an iso file a while ago. I posted the notes on how you can do this (link below). All you need is: 1. a few available partitions (one for storing the files from the iso, one for the installation, ...) 2. some kind of boot loader (I used grub) http://vonbiber.byethost17.com/slackware/nocd/
    Link to this post 21 Jul 10

    I installed slackware from an iso file a while ago.
    I posted the notes on how you can do this (link below).
    All you need is:
    1. a few available partitions (one for storing the files from the iso,
    one for the installation, ...)
    2. some kind of boot loader (I used grub)

    http://vonbiber.byethost17.com/slackware/nocd/

  • vonbiber
    RE: LaTeX - Why and for what?
    been using TeX (plain mostly, occasionnally LaTeX) for years for all kinds of stuff: writing letters, resumes, math articles, documentation, goofy stuff... You can even write music scores, guitar tablatures, crossword puzzles... It's so flexible. All you need really (aside from the compiler) is a text editor. You can even do everything from the CLI, without bothering to open an X session. I do that quite often. There are a number of framebuffer tools that can display the output (pics, pdf ...)
    Link to this post 11 Apr 10

    been using TeX (plain mostly, occasionnally LaTeX) for years for all
    kinds of stuff: writing letters, resumes, math articles,
    documentation, goofy stuff... You can even write music scores,
    guitar tablatures, crossword puzzles... It's so flexible.

    All you need really (aside from the compiler) is a text editor.

    You can even do everything from the CLI, without bothering to open
    an X session. I do that quite often.
    There are a number of framebuffer tools that can display the output (pics, pdf ...)

  • vonbiber
    RE: give it another go
    I always use a single partition for the whole linux system. I have several linux systems on different partitions on my hard drive. I also have a swap partition and larger partitions that I use for storage (that's where I download the isos, etc.). On the partition I'm currently on I use slackware 12.2 and here's the output of the command [code]$ df -h / Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on /dev/root 13G 6.3G 5.9G 52% / [/code] As you can see, even with an 8GB partition you'd stil have plenty of room. You could create a larger partition for large downloads (iso files, videos, etc.)
    Link to this post 27 Jan 10

    I always use a single partition for the whole linux system.
    I have several linux systems on different partitions on my hard drive.
    I also have a swap partition and larger partitions that I use for storage
    (that's where I download the isos, etc.).
    On the partition I'm currently on I use slackware 12.2 and here's the
    output of the command

    $ df -h /
    Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    /dev/root 13G 6.3G 5.9G 52% /

    As you can see, even with an 8GB partition you'd stil have plenty of room.
    You could create a larger partition for large downloads (iso files, videos, etc.)

  • vonbiber
    RE: EXPERT To Answer - The Best of Linux (and Windows)
    As long as you're running windows, the registry gets written to. Why don't you install linux on its own partition? You could 1. use a tool such as gparted to shrink/move your windows partition(s) without losing your windows system You could use a linux live system such as partedmagic (http://partedmagic.com/) partedmagic could be run either from a cd or a usb stick 2. in the remaining available space create partitions to install a) a linux swap partition b) several linux partitions (so you could try different distributions) That way your linux would be more effective. You wouldn't have to rely on Windows. All linux distributions have the necessary software to read pdf files so you don't really need Adobe Acrobat Reader I don't use word processors (I'm a TeX user) but I heard that openOffice is a good alternative to Microsoft Office. When I bought my laptop it had Windows Vista taking up most of the hard drive space and a recovery vista on a second (smaller) partition. I have successfully used gparted from partemagic (and from a usb stick) to do operation 1. The recommended way of doing it is to a) shrink/resize the partitions b) reboot on the windows system so that it will launch a check disk before proceeding to creating new partitions Now I'm exclusively using linux (slackware most of the time, a few linux live systems).
    Link to this post 07 Dec 09

    As long as you're running windows, the registry gets written to.
    Why don't you install linux on its own partition?

    You could
    1. use a tool such as gparted to shrink/move your windows partition(s)
    without losing your windows system
    You could use a linux live system such as partedmagic (http://partedmagic.com/)
    partedmagic could be run either from a cd or a usb stick

    2. in the remaining available space create partitions to install
    a) a linux swap partition
    b) several linux partitions (so you could try different distributions)
    That way your linux would be more effective. You wouldn't have to rely on Windows.

    All linux distributions have the necessary software to read pdf files so you don't
    really need Adobe Acrobat Reader
    I don't use word processors (I'm a TeX user) but I heard that openOffice is a good
    alternative to Microsoft Office.

    When I bought my laptop it had Windows Vista taking up most of the hard drive space
    and a recovery vista on a second (smaller) partition. I have successfully used gparted
    from partemagic (and from a usb stick) to do operation 1.
    The recommended way of doing it is to
    a) shrink/resize the partitions
    b) reboot on the windows system so that it will launch a check disk
    before proceeding to creating new partitions

    Now I'm exclusively using linux (slackware most of the time, a few linux live systems).

  • vonbiber
    RE: wireless internet on laptop.
    can you display the result of each of these 3 commands (from a console/terminal): [code]dmesg | grep -i wireless cat /proc/net/wireless ifconfig -a[/code] What distribution did you install?
    Link to this post 03 Dec 09

    can you display the result of each of these 3 commands (from a console/terminal):

    dmesg | grep -i wireless
    cat /proc/net/wireless
    ifconfig -a

    What distribution did you install?

  • vonbiber
    RE: LaTeX - Why and for what?
    I've been using tex for years now When I have the choice I prefer to use plain tex (instead of latex). It's true that at first it was used mostly for writing math articles/books but it's no longer true. Physicists, chemists, linguists, or anybody that just wants nicely formatted pages ... you can typeset anything with it (including music scores, ...).
    Link to this post 06 Nov 09

    I've been using tex for years now
    When I have the choice I prefer to use plain tex (instead of latex).
    It's true that at first it was used mostly for writing math articles/books
    but it's no longer true.
    Physicists, chemists, linguists, or anybody that just wants nicely
    formatted pages ...
    you can typeset anything with it (including music scores, ...).

  • vonbiber
    RE: Installing on old PC
    you can install slackware without even a cd-drive, doing it all from the hard drive. For this you will need 1. be able to boot from a linux system (it can be a live system) 2. a sufficiently big partition to hold the slackware*.iso file and to extract it to a directory in that same partition 3. a boot loader installed on your hard drive (such as grub) 4. and 2 empty partitions for installing slackware (one for the linux system and a smaller one for the swap) If you meet these requirements then you can read this page where I describe how I did it from my hard drive. I explained it for grub. For other boot loaders (eg lilo) you'll need to adapt ... http://vonbiber.x10hosting.com/slackware/nocd/index.html
    Link to this post 30 Oct 09

    you can install slackware without even a cd-drive, doing it all from the hard drive.
    For this you will need
    1. be able to boot from a linux system (it can be a live system)
    2. a sufficiently big partition to hold the slackware*.iso file and to extract it
    to a directory in that same partition
    3. a boot loader installed on your hard drive (such as grub)
    4. and 2 empty partitions for installing slackware (one for the linux system and
    a smaller one for the swap)

    If you meet these requirements then you can read this page where I describe how
    I did it from my hard drive. I explained it for grub. For other boot loaders (eg lilo)
    you'll need to adapt ...

    http://vonbiber.x10hosting.com/slackware/nocd/index.html

  • vonbiber
    RE: Shell Script Question
    here's a possible script skeleton. Copy the code below and paste into a script file. Fill in with your commands (database creation, etc.). [code] #!/bin/sh LOG=databases.txt usage() { cat <> $LOG return 0 else echo "your error message here" return 1 fi } #check number of arguments entered if [ $# -ne 2 ]; then usage exit $? fi create_database $1 $2 [/code] You should probably use absolute path for the log file, eg [code]LOG=$HOME/databases/databases.txt[/code] That way you could invoke the script from anywhere.
    Link to this post 21 Oct 09

    here's a possible script skeleton. Copy the code below and paste into
    a script file. Fill in with your commands (database creation, etc.).


    #!/bin/sh

    LOG=databases.txt
    usage()
    {
    cat <<END
    USAGE: $0 schema_name database_name
    provide description here
    END
    return 1
    }
    create_database()
    {
    #enter the commands to create the database
    if [ $? -eq 0 ]; then
    echo "created database $2 with schema $1"
    echo "$2 $1" >> $LOG
    return 0
    else
    echo "your error message here"
    return 1
    fi
    }
    #check number of arguments entered
    if [ $# -ne 2 ]; then
    usage
    exit $?
    fi
    create_database $1 $2

    You should probably use absolute path for the log file, eg

    LOG=$HOME/databases/databases.txt

    That way you could invoke the script from anywhere.

  • vonbiber
    RE: Choosing a distro: Pros and Cons from real users
    installed linux system: slackware 12.0 I have installed slackware 13.0 but haven't got around to use it yet. slackware is the very first linux system I installed (can't remember the version number but it's one-digit). I also use live linux systems that I carry on a usb stick: slax, grml, RIPlinux, pmagic I concur with karma's pros A non-graphical installer: that might scare people away People might think that you have to type in cryptic command lines on the console. True: it's not as slick as some other distros (with flashy icons, messages, the ability to use the mouse ...). However it doesn't mean you have to type in cryptic command lines on the console. The installer uses the ncurses-based dialog. You can do your selections by navigating through different options (brief help messages provided). Rather than a limitation I find this an asset. Also you don't answer an endless string of questions. It's kept to the minimum. Once you've made the initial selections the installation is blazingly fast. con: the only boot loader offered is lilo fortunately you can choose not to install a boot loader slackware is a source-based distribution. It's less dependency-prone than other systems that use prebuilt packages. intended users: I do think that slackware is for everone including noobs. Over the years I have installed (and sometimes briefly used) a few other distros: redhat, caldera, debian, libranet, vector linux, mandrake, opensuse, (k/x/)ubuntu, ... Mostly out of curiosity. But slackware is definitely my distro of choice.
    Link to this post 09 Oct 09

    installed linux system: slackware 12.0
    I have installed slackware 13.0 but haven't got around to use it yet.
    slackware is the very first linux system I installed (can't remember the version number but it's one-digit).

    I also use live linux systems that I carry on a usb stick: slax, grml, RIPlinux, pmagic

    I concur with karma's pros

    A non-graphical installer: that might scare people away
    People might think that you have to type in cryptic command lines on the console.
    True: it's not as slick as some other distros (with flashy icons, messages,
    the ability to use the mouse ...). However it doesn't mean you have to type in
    cryptic command lines on the console. The installer uses the ncurses-based dialog.
    You can do your selections by navigating through different options (brief help messages provided).
    Rather than a limitation I find this an asset.
    Also you don't answer an endless string of questions. It's kept to the minimum.
    Once you've made the initial selections the installation is blazingly fast.

    con:
    the only boot loader offered is lilo
    fortunately you can choose not to install a boot loader

    slackware is a source-based distribution. It's less dependency-prone than other
    systems that use prebuilt packages.

    intended users:
    I do think that slackware is for everone including noobs.

    Over the years I have installed (and sometimes briefly used) a few other distros:
    redhat, caldera, debian, libranet, vector linux, mandrake, opensuse, (k/x/)ubuntu, ...
    Mostly out of curiosity.
    But slackware is definitely my distro of choice.

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