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disi

disi

  • Linux.com Member
  • Posts: 11
  • Member Since: 26 May 09
  • Last Logged In: 12 Oct 11

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  • disi
    RE: OilRush anyone :)
    It's not my company. I just try to spread the word, since I couldn't find anything about it in the forum yet. There is also an article on Phoronix about the pre-order. Yes, this is the main reason to show some support... :) The build is 32bit on i386, so they assume everyone on a 64bit system has multilib installed for sound etc.. The most problems seem to be with nvidia cards on Linux, while I had little problems with the AMD binary driver (mesa is missing one of the gl extensions, which is patented but might make it into mesa soon, who knows. And the open source radeon driver might work)
    Link to this post 08 Mar 11

    It's not my company. I just try to spread the word, since I couldn't find anything about it in the forum yet.
    There is also an article on Phoronix about the pre-order.

    Yes, this is the main reason to show some support... :)

    The build is 32bit on i386, so they assume everyone on a 64bit system has multilib installed for sound etc.. The most problems seem to be with nvidia cards on Linux, while I had little problems with the AMD binary driver (mesa is missing one of the gl extensions, which is patented but might make it into mesa soon, who knows. And the open source radeon driver might work)

  • disi
    RE: Choosing a distro: Pros and Cons from real users
    I started with the most common distributions like Debian, Suse, RedHat, Slackware and Mandrake. The problem was always this hunting for .rpm,.deb or tarballs from the developers website. Some were packaging it as .rpm only some only .deb and others again only provided the source code in a tarball. The apache1.2.blabla would only work with php version blabla and so on, there was no real version control. Then came Gentoo and had the first really cool system to handle software installations (Portage), which was adapted from BSD system at that time. You could install, clean uninstall, handle config files and even had version control. You also always used the same tool to do it, "emerge". The available software in the portage tree was always very big and if it is not there, write a bug report and or write the ebuild script yourself (not sooo hard, but barely documented). Gentoo becomes a little like the unknown distribution behind other more fancy ones... like Debian is behind Ubuntu and CentOS is a "copy" of RedHat Enterprise and OpenSuse based on Suse, while Fedora is the testing ground for RedHat itself. If you check http://oswatershed.org/ Gentoo is still one of the most up to date distribution to be able to report bugs upstream, rather than trying to fix the old versions of software to work with the rest of the distribution. (with the current ~unstable directly between Archlinux and Fedora). In Gentoo, if I want to test or use something that is uncommon, I just do it. After all it's all about choice in Gentoo. I do not have to wait until some developer builds a package or changes a setting for me. In reality every person who installs Gentoo is in some way [his|her] own developer, because only [he|she] knows what's going on in the system and what is installed in the first place. Gentoo is too flexible and customizeable to give generic support. This is just some experienceof a Gentoo user :)
    Link to this post 04 Mar 11

    I started with the most common distributions like Debian, Suse, RedHat, Slackware and Mandrake. The problem was always this hunting for .rpm,.deb or tarballs from the developers website.
    Some were packaging it as .rpm only some only .deb and others again only provided the source code in a tarball.
    The apache1.2.blabla would only work with php version blabla and so on, there was no real version control.

    Then came Gentoo and had the first really cool system to handle software installations (Portage), which was adapted from BSD system at that time. You could install, clean uninstall, handle config files and even had version control. You also always used the same tool to do it, "emerge".

    The available software in the portage tree was always very big and if it is not there, write a bug report and or write the ebuild script yourself (not sooo hard, but barely documented).

    Gentoo becomes a little like the unknown distribution behind other more fancy ones... like Debian is behind Ubuntu and CentOS is a "copy" of RedHat Enterprise and OpenSuse based on Suse, while Fedora is the testing ground for RedHat itself.

    If you check http://oswatershed.org/ Gentoo is still one of the most up to date distribution to be able to report bugs upstream, rather than trying to fix the old versions of software to work with the rest of the distribution. (with the current ~unstable directly between Archlinux and Fedora).

    In Gentoo, if I want to test or use something that is uncommon, I just do it. After all it's all about choice in Gentoo.
    I do not have to wait until some developer builds a package or changes a setting for me. In reality every person who installs Gentoo is in some way [his|her] own developer, because only [he|she] knows what's going on in the system and what is installed in the first place. Gentoo is too flexible and customizeable to give generic support.

    This is just some experienceof a Gentoo user :)

  • disi
    OilRush anyone :)
    Unigine started to pre-sale OilRush http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=OTE2Ng It's an RTS like game with up to date graphics engine and really interesting gameplay. There is a Linux and a Windows version. I tested it on ATI HD4770 and it works fine at 80-100fps with the binary drivers. Doesn't work with the open source ATI drivers :( Anyway for ~€14 there is not much to do wrong (like once going to the cinema). The game is still in developement but the tutorials, campagne and multiplayer is up and running... screenshot from yesterday: http://ompldr.org/vN25jMg
    Link to this post 04 Mar 11

    Unigine started to pre-sale OilRush
    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=OTE2Ng

    It's an RTS like game with up to date graphics engine and really interesting gameplay. There is a Linux and a Windows version. I tested it on ATI HD4770 and it works fine at 80-100fps with the binary drivers. Doesn't work with the open source ATI drivers :(
    Anyway for ~€14 there is not much to do wrong (like once going to the cinema).

    The game is still in developement but the tutorials, campagne and multiplayer is up and running...

    screenshot from yesterday: http://ompldr.org/vN25jMg

  • disi
    RE: BeagleBoard
    The beagle board has an arm based CPU, which renders many Distribution useless. As far as I know the following distros support your CPU: Gentoo, Debian, LFS The Slackware and Debian builts for ARM are only CHOST armv6, I think. Have a look at neuvoo, they port Gentoo especially to the Touchbook which uses the beagleboard and they provide a toolchain for armv7a. If you want a graphical user interface is up to you in Gentoo ;) http://neuvoo.org/wiki/index.php?title=Main_Page hope that helps...
    Link to this post 04 Mar 11

    The beagle board has an arm based CPU, which renders many Distribution useless. As far as I know the following distros support your CPU:
    Gentoo, Debian, LFS

    The Slackware and Debian builts for ARM are only CHOST armv6, I think.

    Have a look at neuvoo, they port Gentoo especially to the Touchbook which uses the beagleboard and they provide a toolchain for armv7a. If you want a graphical user interface is up to you in Gentoo ;)

    http://neuvoo.org/wiki/index.php?title=Main_Page

    hope that helps...

  • disi
    RE: Getting started in more uncommon way
    In case you chose Gentoo, Arch or even LFS the question goes more like this: 1. what partitioning should I use? (GPT or MBR?) -> read documentation 2. how do I partition my drives or do I use RAID, LVM, both etc. as well? -> read documentation 3. what filesystem[s] do I want to use -> read documentation 4. what type of binaries do I want to build for my system and for which architecture -> read documentation 5. what bootloader do I want to use? -> read documentation 6. what kernel... (there are 17 different ones in Gentoo) In general it's a good approach if you want to know what the system does. Or you can try Sabayon (which is Gentoo based and uses the same ebuilds), it has a graphical installer and makes most of those choices for you. You can then still dig deeper, since the OS itself is very similiar to Gentoo.
    Link to this post 04 Mar 11

    In case you chose Gentoo, Arch or even LFS the question goes more like this:
    1. what partitioning should I use? (GPT or MBR?) -> read documentation
    2. how do I partition my drives or do I use RAID, LVM, both etc. as well? -> read documentation
    3. what filesystem[s] do I want to use -> read documentation
    4. what type of binaries do I want to build for my system and for which architecture -> read documentation
    5. what bootloader do I want to use? -> read documentation
    6. what kernel... (there are 17 different ones in Gentoo)

    In general it's a good approach if you want to know what the system does.

    Or you can try Sabayon (which is Gentoo based and uses the same ebuilds), it has a graphical installer and makes most of those choices for you. You can then still dig deeper, since the OS itself is very similiar to Gentoo.

  • disi
    RE: Linux & SSDs (Solid State Drives)
    Not personal, yet. But the EeePC and some small notebook ship with ssd inside running Linux. Also this guy tested it: http://torvalds-family.blogspot.com/2008/10/so-i-got-one-of-new-intel-ssds.html
    Link to this post 01 Sep 09

    Not personal, yet. But the EeePC and some small notebook ship with ssd inside running Linux.

    Also this guy tested it: http://torvalds-family.blogspot.com/2008/10/so-i-got-one-of-new-intel-ssds.html

  • disi
    RE: Running processes in the background
    Another cool tool is dtach, you can direct the output to a socket and attach to it as you want (runs like a daemon). [quote]dtach -n /tmp/myprog /usr/bin/myprog[/quote] to attach again: [quote]dtach -a /tmp/myprog[/quote]
    Link to this post 27 May 09

    Another cool tool is dtach, you can direct the output to a socket and attach to it as you want (runs like a daemon).

    dtach -n /tmp/myprog /usr/bin/myprog

    to attach again:

    dtach -a /tmp/myprog

  • disi
    RE: Could not start the X Server
    I do not know about Ubuntu, but for xorg-server it would be: [code]/var/log/Xorg.0.log[/code] You probably have the file without the "0" gdm is "gnome desktop manager" this is a grafical login. I would logon to the system on console prompt (just username/password where the login: is) Then run "startx" and you will get more information.
    Link to this post 27 May 09

    I do not know about Ubuntu, but for xorg-server it would be:

    /var/log/Xorg.0.log

    You probably have the file without the "0"

    gdm is "gnome desktop manager" this is a grafical login.

    I would logon to the system on console prompt (just username/password where the login: is)

    Then run "startx" and you will get more information.

  • disi
    RE: i need help about command copy file.
    make sure you execute the command in the folder, that contains the file libubuntulooks.so the command needs to be executes for each file like: [quote]$sudo cp libubuntulooks.so /usr/lib/gtk-2.0/2.10.0/engines/ $sudo cp libubuntulooks.la /usr/lib/gtk-2.0/2.10.0/engines/ [/quote]
    Link to this post 27 May 09

    make sure you execute the command in the folder, that contains the file libubuntulooks.so

    the command needs to be executes for each file
    like:

    $sudo cp libubuntulooks.so /usr/lib/gtk-2.0/2.10.0/engines/
    $sudo cp libubuntulooks.la /usr/lib/gtk-2.0/2.10.0/engines/

  • disi
    RE: Favorite game?
    currently installed: puzzle game: einstein (warning is addictive) wine: Red Alert 3 :)
    Link to this post 27 May 09

    currently installed:

    puzzle game: einstein (warning is addictive)

    wine: Red Alert 3 :)

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