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dannydamsky

dannydamsky

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  • Posts: 2
  • Member Since: 04 Dec 13
  • Last Logged In: 04 Dec 13

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  • dannydamsky
    RE: Linux or Windows?
    [quote="Alexander Stephen"]"It seems that I will decline the idea of switching to linux and I will wait for SteamOS. I hope that will come soon."[/quote] That won't do you any good, since SteamOS is Linux-based, all the games that will work on it, will also work on regular Linux distributions. My situation is pretty similar to yours, so I can tell you what I did. I got 2 disks, don't worry though you can do it with one too. I installed Windows on one disk, cleaned it, turned off many services, effects, etc..In other words, made it gaming-only. On the other disk I installed Linux Mint 16, and installed everything else on it, which includes, Music, Videos, all the programming stuff, and LibreOffice. I've been doing this for quite a while, and from my experience it's a great way to combine both systems into what they're currently most useful at. (And of course when games are released on Linux I play them on Linux and delete them from Windows because Linux is awesome! :D)
    Link to this post 04 Dec 13

    Alexander Stephen said:

    "It seems that I will decline the idea of switching to linux and I will wait for SteamOS. I hope that will come soon."

    That won't do you any good, since SteamOS is Linux-based, all the games that will work on it, will also work on regular Linux distributions. My situation is pretty similar to yours, so I can tell you what I did.

    I got 2 disks, don't worry though you can do it with one too.

    I installed Windows on one disk, cleaned it, turned off many services, effects, etc..In other words, made it gaming-only.

    On the other disk I installed Linux Mint 16, and installed everything else on it, which includes, Music, Videos, all the programming stuff, and LibreOffice.

    I've been doing this for quite a while, and from my experience it's a great way to combine both systems into what they're currently most useful at. (And of course when games are released on Linux I play them on Linux and delete them from Windows because Linux is awesome! :D)

  • dannydamsky
    RE: Getting involved in linux
    In my opinion you should first go into programming a bit before getting into Linux, it could give you an idea of how most things work with computers. I would recommend starting with "Web Fundamentals" which is HTML and CSS, and after that, learn a bit of Javascript, you could learn it at http://www.codecademy.com/ it is a great site, I learned a lot from there. After you're done there, you could learn to get around in the terminal, like doing your basic tasks in the terminal. For instance: 1. Update your system. 2. View your open tasks / kill a task 3. Edit a text file 4. Install an application 5. Open an application via a command 6. Use X-Based apps, like file managers, games, etc... For file manager I'd recommend MC After that you could start getting into some tougher steps like logging into ROOT or compiling a kernel. After trying all that out, when you feel like you understand more or less how all the basics are done, you could start learning kernel development. If you feel like you still need some more practice you could learn how to install Arch linux, that could be a great tutorial for you. Cheers! -danny
    Link to this post 04 Dec 13

    In my opinion you should first go into programming a bit before getting into Linux, it could give you an idea of how most things work with computers. I would recommend starting with "Web Fundamentals" which is HTML and CSS, and after that, learn a bit of Javascript, you could learn it at http://www.codecademy.com/ it is a great site, I learned a lot from there.

    After you're done there, you could learn to get around in the terminal, like doing your basic tasks in the terminal.
    For instance:
    1. Update your system.
    2. View your open tasks / kill a task
    3. Edit a text file
    4. Install an application
    5. Open an application via a command
    6. Use X-Based apps, like file managers, games, etc... For file manager I'd recommend MC
    After that you could start getting into some tougher steps like logging into ROOT or compiling a kernel.

    After trying all that out, when you feel like you understand more or less how all the basics are done, you could start learning kernel development. If you feel like you still need some more practice you could learn how to install Arch linux, that could be a great tutorial for you.
    Cheers!
    -danny

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