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Reed

Reed

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  • Posts: 16
  • Member Since: 13 May 09
  • Last Logged In: 04 Feb 10

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  • Reed
    RE: Quick Question............
    Slitaz has a floppy image. It's not the whole distro, though, just a boot disk. The distro itself is about 25 mb. http://www.slitaz.org/en/get/#floppy
    Link to this post 02 Jun 09

    Slitaz has a floppy image. It's not the whole distro, though, just a boot disk. The distro itself is about 25 mb.

    http://www.slitaz.org/en/get/#floppy

  • Reed
    RE: how to install kscope in Ubuntu 9.04?
    Seems as though you'll need to build it from source. You can get the source code here: http://kscope.sourceforge.net/dload.shtml Download it, navigate to the download directory from the terminal and extract the file. [code]tar xzvf kscope-1.9.4.tar.gz[/code] You need the basic build tools. [code]sudo apt-get install build-essential[/code] It depends on >Qt 4.4.0 and Qscintilla2, both available in the Jaunty repositories. I would also install checkinstall, to your package manager can track the package. [code]sudo install checkinstall[/code] Then [code]qmake make sudo checkinstall[/code] More on compiling from source in Ubuntu. https://help.ubuntu.com/community/CompilingEasyHowTo
    Link to this post 29 May 09

    Seems as though you'll need to build it from source. You can get the source code here:
    http://kscope.sourceforge.net/dload.shtml

    Download it, navigate to the download directory from the terminal and extract the file.

    tar xzvf kscope-1.9.4.tar.gz

    You need the basic build tools.

    sudo apt-get install build-essential

    It depends on >Qt 4.4.0 and Qscintilla2, both available in the Jaunty repositories.

    I would also install checkinstall, to your package manager can track the package.

    sudo install checkinstall

    Then

    qmake
    make
    sudo checkinstall

    More on compiling from source in Ubuntu.
    https://help.ubuntu.com/community/CompilingEasyHowTo

  • Reed
    RE: Could not start the X Server
    Usually this would mean the X server is not configured properly. If you log in from the command prompt you can try reconfiguring it with [code]sudo dpkg-reconfigure -phigh xserver-xorg[/code] The conf file is located at [b]/etc/X11/xorg.conf[/b] To restart gdm, do [code]sudo /etc/init.d/gdm restart[/code] Also, everything that disi mentioned.
    Link to this post 27 May 09

    Usually this would mean the X server is not configured properly. If you log in from the command prompt you can try reconfiguring it with

    sudo dpkg-reconfigure -phigh xserver-xorg

    The conf file is located at /etc/X11/xorg.conf

    To restart gdm, do

    sudo /etc/init.d/gdm restart

    Also, everything that disi mentioned.

  • Reed
    RE: Show Us Your Linux Desktop
    My dell mini 9, running Arch Linux + GNOME. [url=http://img177.imageshack.us/my.php?image=miniy.png][img]http://img177.imageshack.us/img177/8936/miniy.th.png[/img][/url]
    Link to this post 24 May 09

    My dell mini 9, running Arch Linux + GNOME.

  • Reed
    RE: Screenshots please
    My dell mini 9: [url]http://kporter.homelinux.com/~kaleb/cpg14x/displayimage.php?album=random&cat=0&pos=-28[/url]
    Link to this post 24 May 09

    My dell mini 9:

    http://kporter.homelinux.com/~kaleb/cpg14x/displayimage.php?album=random&cat=0&pos=-28

  • Reed
    RE: KopenSUSE? :/
    Honestly, I don't particularly care if linux becomes the desktop of choice among the masses. I only want a large enough user-base that all the major vendors give us as much support as they do Apple, so I can flash my BIOS without using FreeDos, or watch friggin' abc.com. But as far as it goes, I don't think GNU/Linux will ever get mass adoption until it becomes common place in schools. The only reason people find linux troublesome is unfamiliarity. If you used linux in grade school, and were able to buy linux preinstalled on computers, there would be no more trouble than with Apple or Microsoft. Probably quite a bit less than with Windows, since you wouldn't spend so much time fighting off malware. Also, the more "user-friendliness" is pushed, the more the integral flexibility and power of the system is compromised. Looking at Macs for an example, you have a Unix-based system that is utterly locked down. Yes, you have a nice user interface, but I couldn't stand the rigidity. Also look at some of the dumbed-down netbook distros like Linpus Lite, where access to the command line and package manager are disabled by default. I suppose from the perspective of Acer as a company, it makes sense - if you have those enabled, it becomes very easy for the novice user to break their machine. In the desktop OS sphere, it's a very delicate balance between maintaining the flexibility and power that so many of us love, and having a clear, easy interface with which to interact with the system. As far as being able to walk into a store and have a huge linux section...well, distro-wise, that will probably never be the case, since broadband internet is becoming so ubiquitous and it's free to download almost any distro, but walk into any good bookstore, and there is often a pretty significant section dedicated to linux and unix, and the magazine stand usually has at least half a dozen linux mags, with discs included.
    Link to this post 23 May 09

    Honestly, I don't particularly care if linux becomes the desktop of choice among the masses. I only want a large enough user-base that all the major vendors give us as much support as they do Apple, so I can flash my BIOS without using FreeDos, or watch friggin' abc.com.

    But as far as it goes, I don't think GNU/Linux will ever get mass adoption until it becomes common place in schools. The only reason people find linux troublesome is unfamiliarity. If you used linux in grade school, and were able to buy linux preinstalled on computers, there would be no more trouble than with Apple or Microsoft. Probably quite a bit less than with Windows, since you wouldn't spend so much time fighting off malware.

    Also, the more "user-friendliness" is pushed, the more the integral flexibility and power of the system is compromised. Looking at Macs for an example, you have a Unix-based system that is utterly locked down. Yes, you have a nice user interface, but I couldn't stand the rigidity. Also look at some of the dumbed-down netbook distros like Linpus Lite, where access to the command line and package manager are disabled by default. I suppose from the perspective of Acer as a company, it makes sense - if you have those enabled, it becomes very easy for the novice user to break their machine. In the desktop OS sphere, it's a very delicate balance between maintaining the flexibility and power that so many of us love, and having a clear, easy interface with which to interact with the system.

    As far as being able to walk into a store and have a huge linux section...well, distro-wise, that will probably never be the case, since broadband internet is becoming so ubiquitous and it's free to download almost any distro, but walk into any good bookstore, and there is often a pretty significant section dedicated to linux and unix, and the magazine stand usually has at least half a dozen linux mags, with discs included.

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