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Wicked

Wicked

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  • Posts: 24
  • Member Since: 30 Jul 09
  • Last Logged In: 17 Jul 10

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  • Wicked
    RE: This man is Brilliant. Take a few mins and READ.
    His words are so well spoken, its unbelievable. If you have time read this mans article's, he my touch your heart the way he's touched mine. POWAHFULL
    Link to this post 25 Sep 09

    His words are so well spoken, its unbelievable. If you have time read this mans article's, he my touch your heart the way he's touched mine. POWAHFULL

  • Wicked
    This man is Brilliant. Take a few mins and READ.
    What's the difference between a novice and a professional? One word summation...training. There is a classic line that I love in the Denzel Washington movie Man on Fire when he is training Dakota Fanning's character on improving her swimming times: "There is no such thing as tough. There is trained and untrained. Now which are you?" It is a good statement and an excellent question. Which are you in the world of Linux? Training is defined by Webster's as: * the act, process, or method of one that trains. * the skill, knowledge, or experience acquired by one that trains. * the state of being trained. The other day I wrote about Linux certifications. In that article I gave my opinion that although a certification was not a necessity nor requirement, it was not a bad idea for someone who wanted to gain a good foundation in what Linux was all about. However, my primary point was that "Linux affords you the level of "certification" you desire to achieve just by being Linux. You essentially gain your certification by being involved with Linux and using it". The keyword is involved. Without being involved and actively using Linux you will never gain any aptitude. You are left being untrained. I watch forums and read questions from people who's only desire is to have someone do their work for them. They are not gaining any useful skills or knowledge because they just click and configure based on someone else who spoon fed them the answer. In a sense they are stuck in "Windows" mode, meaning they just want to double click and have the machine install and be done. There is not anything wrong with that per se, but training in Linux means doing. The act of doing equates to experience. One cannot be hesitant to try things and fail in Linux. If doing leads to experience, then the experience will lead to judgment, which will make you a more effective system administrator, engineer or developer. Putting it another way, good judgment comes from experience and experience comes from bad judgement. But ultimately that experience comes from you training yourself. Gaining the experience takes time in training. You have to consistently be willing to explore the file system and do things over and over. There is a saying in the Army that was drilled into us that slow is smooth and smooth is fast. What that means is if you put the time in your training to do it right, to learn from your actions and your failures, your experience grows and makes you ultimately faster. Developers don't just learn C and write out the next latest and greatest kernel overnight. They hone and sharpen their skills by doing and gaining the experience. They train in their art of C. Just remember, training never stops. I learn new things and techniques almost daily. My advice to those new to Linux is never be afraid to fail. It takes time and effort to train, but remember that the penguin rewards your training. There is nothing more satisfying than installing and configuring a system that is reliable, flexible and rock solid...and knowing that it was your experience and training that made it possible. If you are serious about the Linux craft here are some great links that will help you train yourself (the links will open in a new browser, check your pop-up blocker if it does not work): * Easiest Linux Guide You'll Ever Read / htttp://www.linux-books.us/suse_0002.php / Designed especially for those who are in an early transition from Windows to Linux. Specifically written from the SUSE distribution use. * Linux Professional Institute LPI 101 and 102 course instruction materials / http://www.ledge.co.za/software/lpinotes / Licensed under the GNU documentation license, these are professionally developed study guides that are distribution neutral. They were developed for those wishing to sit for the LPI entry level certification and an excellent reference. * The Cathedral and the Bazaar / http://www.catb.org/~esr/writings/cathedral-bazaar/ / If you want to understand what open source is all about and what Linux means from the open source perspective this is a must read. There are multiple translations if English is not your mother tongue. * IBM Linux Library / http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/views/linux/libraryview.jsp / Big Blue has an extensive collection of great Linux articles and howtos that are great references. E.g want to know about the proc directories? -> http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/linux/library/l-adfly.html * Linux Device Drivers / http://lwn.net/Kernel/LDD3/ / Are you a developer and want to know everything about Linux Device Drivers and such? This is an excellent starting point. * Debian Administration / http://www.debian-administration.org/ / If you are a fan of the Debian distribution, such as myself, then this is a great training portal. * Loads of Linux Links / http://loll.sourceforge.net/linux/links/ / A central repository of over 5000 links that are specifically related to Linux and all the aspects of the environment (system administration, engineering, developing, security, magazines etc). So the challenge question to you is which are you...trained or untrained? I challenge you to keep training and don't get discouraged about how quickly you might or might not pick things up. Remember...slow is smooth and smooth is fast. Cheers - Kryptikos
    Link to this post 25 Sep 09

    What's the difference between a novice and a professional? One word summation...training. There is a classic line that I love in the Denzel Washington movie Man on Fire when he is training Dakota Fanning's character on improving her swimming times:

    "There is no such thing as tough. There is trained and untrained. Now which are you?"

    It is a good statement and an excellent question. Which are you in the world of Linux? Training is defined by Webster's as:

    * the act, process, or method of one that trains.
    * the skill, knowledge, or experience acquired by one that trains.
    * the state of being trained.

    The other day I wrote about Linux certifications. In that article I gave my opinion that although a certification was not a necessity nor requirement, it was not a bad idea for someone who wanted to gain a good foundation in what Linux was all about. However, my primary point was that "Linux affords you the level of "certification" you desire to achieve just by being Linux. You essentially gain your certification by being involved with Linux and using it".

    The keyword is involved. Without being involved and actively using Linux you will never gain any aptitude. You are left being untrained. I watch forums and read questions from people who's only desire is to have someone do their work for them. They are not gaining any useful skills or knowledge because they just click and configure based on someone else who spoon fed them the answer. In a sense they are stuck in "Windows" mode, meaning they just want to double click and have the machine install and be done. There is not anything wrong with that per se, but training in Linux means doing. The act of doing equates to experience. One cannot be hesitant to try things and fail in Linux. If doing leads to experience, then the experience will lead to judgment, which will make you a more effective system administrator, engineer or developer. Putting it another way, good judgment comes from experience and experience comes from bad judgement. But ultimately that experience comes from you training yourself.

    Gaining the experience takes time in training. You have to consistently be willing to explore the file system and do things over and over. There is a saying in the Army that was drilled into us that slow is smooth and smooth is fast. What that means is if you put the time in your training to do it right, to learn from your actions and your failures, your experience grows and makes you ultimately faster. Developers don't just learn C and write out the next latest and greatest kernel overnight. They hone and sharpen their skills by doing and gaining the experience. They train in their art of C.

    Just remember, training never stops. I learn new things and techniques almost daily. My advice to those new to Linux is never be afraid to fail. It takes time and effort to train, but remember that the penguin rewards your training. There is nothing more satisfying than installing and configuring a system that is reliable, flexible and rock solid...and knowing that it was your experience and training that made it possible.

    If you are serious about the Linux craft here are some great links that will help you train yourself (the links will open in a new browser, check your pop-up blocker if it does not work):

    * Easiest Linux Guide You'll Ever Read / htttp://www.linux-books.us/suse_0002.php / Designed especially for those who are in an early transition from Windows to Linux. Specifically written from the SUSE distribution use.

    * Linux Professional Institute LPI 101 and 102 course instruction materials / http://www.ledge.co.za/software/lpinotes / Licensed under the GNU documentation license, these are professionally developed study guides that are distribution neutral. They were developed for those wishing to sit for the LPI entry level certification and an excellent reference.

    * The Cathedral and the Bazaar / http://www.catb.org/~esr/writings/cathedral-bazaar/ / If you want to understand what open source is all about and what Linux means from the open source perspective this is a must read. There are multiple translations if English is not your mother tongue.

    * IBM Linux Library / http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/views/linux/libraryview.jsp / Big Blue has an extensive collection of great Linux articles and howtos that are great references. E.g want to know about the proc directories? -> http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/linux/library/l-adfly.html

    * Linux Device Drivers / http://lwn.net/Kernel/LDD3/ / Are you a developer and want to know everything about Linux Device Drivers and such? This is an excellent starting point.

    * Debian Administration / http://www.debian-administration.org/ / If you are a fan of the Debian distribution, such as myself, then this is a great training portal.

    * Loads of Linux Links / http://loll.sourceforge.net/linux/links/ / A central repository of over 5000 links that are specifically related to Linux and all the aspects of the environment (system administration, engineering, developing, security, magazines etc).

    So the challenge question to you is which are you...trained or untrained? I challenge you to keep training and don't get discouraged about how quickly you might or might not pick things up. Remember...slow is smooth and smooth is fast.

    Cheers - Kryptikos

  • Wicked
    RE: hosts.allow question
    I'm going to take a stab in the dark here, please correct me if im wrong. I want to test my knowledge, without doing any research . You would like to solve the following issue : forgetting which IP belongs to specific Nodes.. Would the following syntax work? Doesn't the semicolon break the line then allow you to write notes behind it? [code] # IP Addresses Names vsftpd: 12.34.56.78 ; John 12.34.56.79 ; Roger :allow [/code] Or maybe something like that to If the above doesn't work. and if you had mulitple lines you would start a second line of names. [code] # John Roger # Chris Same vsftpd: 12.34.56.78, 12.34.56.79 [/code] Technically you could have multiple lines because say you have 20 IP's that you need to allow. They all wouldn't fit on one line. So it would end up looking like this. vsftpd: 12.34.56.78, 12.34.56.79, 12.34.56.78, 12.34.56.79,12.34.56.78, 12.34.56.79, 12.34.56.78, 12.34.56.79, 12.34.56.78, 12.34.56.79,12.34.56.78, 12.34.56.79, 12.34.56.78, 12.34.56.79 : allow But that's just taking a stab in the dark... I would say, make a back up of the file and play around with it. If you get a syntax error then you know you can't do it.
    Link to this post 04 Sep 09

    I'm going to take a stab in the dark here, please correct me if im wrong. I want to test my knowledge, without doing any research . You would like to solve the following issue : forgetting which IP belongs to specific Nodes..

    Would the following syntax work? Doesn't the semicolon break the line then allow you to write notes behind it?


    # IP Addresses Names
    vsftpd: 12.34.56.78 ; John
    12.34.56.79 ; Roger
    :allow

    Or maybe something like that to If the above doesn't work. and if you had mulitple lines you would start a second line of names.


    # John Roger
    # Chris Same
    vsftpd: 12.34.56.78, 12.34.56.79

    Technically you could have multiple lines because say you have 20 IP's that you need to allow. They all wouldn't fit on one line. So it would end up looking like this.


    vsftpd: 12.34.56.78, 12.34.56.79, 12.34.56.78, 12.34.56.79,12.34.56.78, 12.34.56.79, 12.34.56.78, 12.34.56.79, 12.34.56.78, 12.34.56.79,12.34.56.78,
    12.34.56.79, 12.34.56.78, 12.34.56.79 : allow


    But that's just taking a stab in the dark... I would say, make a back up of the file and play around with it. If you get a syntax error then you know you can't do it.

  • Wicked
    RE: Advice for choosing a linux distro please
    You can go to [url]www.distrowatch.com[/url], to find something that will suite your needs. This is one of the most common questions before someone makes the crossover from windows to linux. Just make sure you grab a hammer and a nail when you do so you can nail those that window shut! :P mostly all of linux distro are good for even the oldest of PC's because you can choose what you want to install. I once hear linux is a package game, choose what you want and leave the rest behind for another day. There are lots of new distros out there now, so don't limit yourself because you have lots of options. Read up try to find something that suits you and if you don't like it find something else! In my own personal experiance the RPM package game is kind of touchy. My own experience with F11 wasn't the greatest. Check out Ubuntu or Opensuse, but thats just my opinion :D Like arochester said. LiveCD's are god sent! don't be afraid to waste a few pennies downloading a few different LiveCD's
    Link to this post 03 Sep 09

    You can go to www.distrowatch.com, to find something that will suite your needs. This is one of the most common questions before someone makes the crossover from windows to linux.

    Just make sure you grab a hammer and a nail when you do so you can nail those that window shut! :P

    mostly all of linux distro are good for even the oldest of PC's because you can choose what you want to install. I once hear linux is a package game, choose what you want and leave the rest behind for another day.

    There are lots of new distros out there now, so don't limit yourself because you have lots of options. Read up try to find something that suits you and if you don't like it find something else! In my own personal experiance the RPM package game is kind of touchy. My own experience with F11 wasn't the greatest.

    Check out Ubuntu or Opensuse, but thats just my opinion :D Like arochester said. LiveCD's are god sent! don't be afraid to waste a few pennies downloading a few different LiveCD's

  • Wicked
    RE: booting live cd to dual boot system
    Dual booting is a simple process now and days. Just make sure when you do dual boot that you ALWAYS in stall windows first then any linux distro. If you reverse the process you are going to be writing a script the to he master boot record that might be out of your league. Cause it sure was out of mine :blink: Choose a distro that suites your needs. pop in the cd and it'll take care of most of the work for you. Don't go getting click happy though just because it is a simple process READING is power in the world of linux. BEST of luck and WELCOME TO LINUX.com! I just thought about your question thought... Do you already have a system which is dual booting at the present moment? If so... You'll now just be adding another partition to your system. Process is the same just make sure you have the right amout of space on your HD that your distro requires. You can go to [url]www.distrowatch.com[/url] to find a flavor of linux that suites you best. Personally I would recomment OpenSuse or Ubuntu for anybody getting their feet wet. Wow. I really shouldn't write at 2am in the morning, after just waking up... Next time I'll just keep my mouth shut. GRAMMER...
    Link to this post 03 Sep 09

    Dual booting is a simple process now and days. Just make sure when you do dual boot that you ALWAYS in stall windows first then any linux distro.

    If you reverse the process you are going to be writing a script the to he master boot record that might be out of your league. Cause it sure was out of mine :blink:

    Choose a distro that suites your needs. pop in the cd and it'll take care of most of the work for you. Don't go getting click happy though just because it is a simple process READING is power in the world of linux.

    BEST of luck and WELCOME TO LINUX.com!

    I just thought about your question thought...

    Do you already have a system which is dual booting at the present moment? If so... You'll now just be adding another partition to your system. Process is the same just make sure you have the right amout of space on your HD that your distro requires.

    You can go to www.distrowatch.com to find a flavor of linux that suites you best. Personally I would recomment OpenSuse or Ubuntu for anybody getting their feet wet.


    Wow. I really shouldn't write at 2am in the morning, after just waking up... Next time I'll just keep my mouth shut. GRAMMER...

  • Wicked
    RE: about working of man cmd
    Or you can type this into CLI "man man" without the quotes
    Link to this post 03 Sep 09

    Or you can type this into CLI "man man" without the quotes

  • Wicked
    RE: Please ignore this thread.
    lol Yeah good laugh. I'll have to try it someday :D
    Link to this post 01 Sep 09

    lol Yeah good laugh. I'll have to try it someday :D

  • Wicked
    RE: help!!
    I would recommend either OpenSuse or Ubuntu for starts. Both are solid for starters. Just make sure you do some research on which ever you choose before you make the switch. If you have a factory computer i.e (Compaq, Hp, Emachine) you could run into some driver issues, but most drivers are current and up to date. better safe then sorry though :D
    Link to this post 29 Aug 09

    I would recommend either OpenSuse or Ubuntu for starts. Both are solid for starters. Just make sure you do some research on which ever you choose before you make the switch.

    If you have a factory computer i.e (Compaq, Hp, Emachine) you could run into some driver issues, but most drivers are current and up to date. better safe then sorry though :D

  • Wicked
    RE: Please ignore this thread.
    lol here's a dirty trick I thought to play on a friend that has a linux box. Go into the inittab and set the default run level to 6 shutdown -h now!!!! sit back and watch them wonder what the hell is going on...would it work???? would this do infinite loops of reboots? Ok I know I'm evil but it would be funny...LOL
    Link to this post 28 Aug 09

    lol here's a dirty trick I thought to play on a friend that has a linux box.

    Go into the inittab and set the default run level to 6

    shutdown -h now!!!!

    sit back and watch them wonder what the hell is going on...would it work???? would this do infinite loops of reboots?

    Ok I know I'm evil but it would be funny...LOL

  • Wicked
    RE: Please ignore this thread.
    Lol its ok Deatharte, Everyone must start at some place. At one point kryptikos was a "newbie" to just like all the other guru's in the community. [quote]To become one of the great are you willing to accept and conquer any challenge?[/quote]
    Link to this post 28 Aug 09

    Lol its ok Deatharte, Everyone must start at some place. At one point kryptikos was a "newbie" to just like all the other guru's in the community.

    To become one of the great are you willing to accept and conquer any challenge?

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