Linux.com

Home Linux Community Forums Software Productivity max/ideal value of items in limits.conf in rhel5?

max/ideal value of items in limits.conf in rhel5?

Link to this post 01 Jan 11

i want to set limits in /etc/security/limits.conf.My os is rhel 5.2.
It was giving continuous messages in in /var/log/secure like :
Jan 1 09:46:43 yn55 sshd[31742]: pam_limits(sshd:session): wrong limit value 'unlimited' for limit type 'soft'
Jan 1 09:46:43 yn55 sshd[31742]: pam_limits(sshd:session): wrong limit value 'unlimited' for limit type 'hard'
continuously.
I have changed values of priority and nice to "0" from unlimited and messages are not comming. But i want to know what is the ideal/maximum value of these two items? Is 0 value set is correct? To what should i set it to? I want it to be maximum.

* soft core unlimited
* hard core unlimited
* soft data unlimited
* hard data unlimited
* soft fsize unlimited
* hard fsize unlimited
* soft memlock -1
* hard memlock -1
* soft nofile 20000
* hard nofile 20000
* soft rss unlimited
* hard rss unlimited
* soft stack unlimited
* hard stack unlimited
* soft cpu unlimited
* hard cpu unlimited
* soft nproc unlimited
* hard nproc unlimited
* soft as unlimited
* hard as unlimited
* soft maxlogins unlimited
* hard maxlogins unlimited
* soft maxsyslogins unlimited
* hard maxsyslogins unlimited
* soft priority 0
* hard priority 0
* soft locks unlimited
* hard locks unlimited
* soft sigpending unlimited
* hard sigpending unlimited
* soft msgqueue unlimited
* hard msgqueue unlimited
* soft nice 0
* hard nice 0
* soft rtprio unlimited
* hard rtprio unlimited

Link to this post 01 Jan 11

Bu what I read at http://www.kernel.org/pub/linux/libs/pam/Linux-PAM-html/old/pam-6.html the accepted values represent the filesize in kb, so any non-numeric entry would be invalid. The actual maximum value are based upon system specific limits for each system that it is running on.

0 generally means no limit, but you also have the option to comment out the effected lines or disable the pam module so that no limits will be imposed in relation to the resource module.

Who we are ?

The Linux Foundation is a non-profit consortium dedicated to the growth of Linux.

More About the foundation...

Frequent Questions

Join / Linux Training / Board