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Switching Over

Link to this post 10 Mar 11

Hello,

New to the system -> have not gotten through all FAQs yet.

I am buying new netbook. Am really interested in dropping win7starter and running Linux.
My question is about switching everything I currently do on my desktop (WIN XP 32) and doing the tasks on Linux (on my netbook first). I am an engineering student and will use netbook for school mostly. Netbook new -1.66Gz Dual Core with 2 Gb RAM (10.1").

Running MATLab
Running Power Point
Online radio
Watching DVD's
Sharing media with my friends
Connecting devices - (I have a blue tooth USB headset)
Running Rosetta Stone
Possibly running Ableton Live 8
Connecting to my desktop to exchange files

What are some issues I can expect in the switch? I have been intereseted in Linux for a while now. I would like to get into it as there seems to have major functional advantages over Windows - like less required memory for simple tasks. If everything is smooth on Netbook I will likely install Linux on my desktop.

Thanks,

J
J

Link to this post 10 Mar 11

Jonny10 wrote:

Netbook new -1.66Gz Dual Core with 2 Gb RAM (10.1").

The hardware will be more than sufficient.
Jonny10 wrote:
Running MATLab

Matlab can run through the wine emulator, but some version have experienced issues, you can find details at http://appdb.winehq.org/objectManager.php?sClass=application&iId=49

Jonny10 wrote:

Running Power Point

You can install ms Office via an emulator like wine or use a native Linux based office suite such as koffice, openoffice or libreoffice to edit and create presentation files that are compatible with ms powerpoint.

Jonny10 wrote:

Online radio

It depends on the method of transmission you can listen to any flash based radio stations or capture auto streams through vlc

Jonny10 wrote:

Watching DVD's

To watch dvds you will need to install the libdvdcss library to decrypt the dvds, that library is available on most distros, but will require some research to figure out how to install it since it it a topic of some potential legal issues.

Jonny10 wrote:

Sharing media with my friends

Depending on your choice of distro it should be reasonably simple to setup a http, ftp or samba server to share files with others.

Jonny10 wrote:


Connecting devices - (I have a blue tooth USB headset)

The bluetooth libraries are also included in most distros, however you may need to check the net for possible compatibility issues with the devices you use.

Jonny10 wrote:

Running Rosetta Stone

Rosetta stone can also be run through the wine emulator (http://appdb.winehq.org/objectManager.php?sClass=application&iId=1867), however just as with the other app depending on the version you are running you may experience issues.

Jonny10 wrote:


Possibly running Ableton Live 8

That app can also work through wine, check winedb for compatibility issues at http://appdb.winehq.org/objectManager.php?sClass=application&iId=2113

Jonny10 wrote:

Connecting to my desktop to exchange files

This applies with the file sharing that you previously listed.

Jonny10 wrote:


What are some issues I can expect in the switch? I have been intereseted in Linux for a while now. I would like to get into it as there seems to have major functional advantages over Windows - like less required memory for simple tasks. If everything is smooth on Netbook I will likely install Linux on my desktop.

The Linux based system do require less resources than windows and in general offer a more stable experience. The greatest change you will need to prepare yourself for is the fact that windows applications are not made to run on Linux based systems, some can be run through an emulator but the general recommendation is to find a native Linux based application to replace those apps so you don't have to continue using work-arounds.

Link to this post 11 Mar 11

Hello,

Thanks for your response. You addressed all of my concerns.

I have some more questions. I read an article suggesting that it is best to install win 7 and a distribution ( I am looking at kubuntu) as a dual boot option (partitioned hard drive) rather than uninstall windows completely and write over with a different OS. I am interested in your thoughts on this.

This appeals to me because then I could just dedicate the windows partition to some tasks that may not work ideally with WINE - I am thinking ableton. In general it seems to be a more versatile solution.

How would this dual boot option affect computing performance? Would start up shut down be longer? Would there be any lag on the system? I don't think there should be aside from having to make the one distinction upon boot up ( >>Windows (y/n)? ) Once an OS is choosen all of your resources are there & dedicated?

I am also thinking about upgrading the windows 7 starter to home edition or ultimate. If that complicates anything.

As far as file formats are concerned I don't fully understand the legal issues. MP3 & MP4, MPEG, AVI, AC3 Dolby audio filters.. are these licensed for use only under windows? Hence using emulation and not supporting directily in distribution?

Web browsing under kubuntu would be the same/similar experience - ie it is able to view all web pages?

What about system management. Disk defragmentation, harddrive scans, virus scans, spyware, registry, and PC speed utilities? Are these not required on a distribution? I currently use AVG anti virus, Unible registry and Speed updates on windows desktop, I perform defrag often. I understand that virus & spyware is uncommon on a distribution but is there no system manegement required?

It is easy to connect a USB wireless mouse. I just have to write some code?

Thanks for the thoughts!

J

Link to this post 12 Mar 11

Jonny10 wrote:

Hello,

New to the system -> have not gotten through all FAQs yet.

I am buying new netbook. Am really interested in dropping win7starter and running Linux.
My question is about switching everything I currently do on my desktop (WIN XP 32) and doing the tasks on Linux (on my netbook first). I am an engineering student and will use netbook for school mostly. Netbook new -1.66Gz Dual Core with 2 Gb RAM (10.1").

Running MATLab
Running Power Point
Online radio
Watching DVD's
Sharing media with my friends
Connecting devices - (I have a blue tooth USB headset)
Running Rosetta Stone
Possibly running Ableton Live 8
Connecting to my desktop to exchange files

What are some issues I can expect in the switch? I have been intereseted in Linux for a while now. I would like to get into it as there seems to have major functional advantages over Windows - like less required memory for simple tasks. If everything is smooth on Netbook I will likely install Linux on my desktop.

Thanks,

J
J

Matlab - they have both 32-bit and 64-bit Linux versions
Power Point - Open Office or (better) Libre Office
Online Radio - I use VLC Media Player to stream radio - doing that now
Watching DVDs - as long as you install the decss library, most Linux media players will play commercial DVDs just fine
Sharing Media - there are a bunch of Linux tools, such as ffmpeg, that can transcode just about any A/V format into any other
Connecting Devices - current Linux kernels support just about anything you might have, including bluetooth headset.
Rosetta Stone - Seems to be Windows only. You may need to run it on Windows in a virtual machine.
Ableton Live 8 - there are good linux substitutes such as Audacity for music composition, mixing, etc.
Connecting to Desktop - I assume the desktop is Windows. That is easy enough, either sharing your Windows folders or Linux folders using Samba/CIFS. You can also remote control your desktop using tools like VNC. You run a service for VNC on Windows, and then you can connect and view/control the desktop from your Linux system. I do this all the time for remote client support.

Issues? Different packages that do the same thing still have different interfaces, features, glitches, etc. All this takes getting used to. Also, some things on Linux you will have to do from the command line, so be prepared to get comfortable with that. In any case, Linux is much more secure (no virus scanners generally needed but are available).

Link to this post 12 Mar 11

If you are new to an Operating system it is still a good idea to keep your old OS to fall back on for features that you have not found in the new OS. I do recommend for you to utilize a dual boot system to start, the precaution is to install windows first them install your chosen Linux distro on the remaining unpartitioned space. The reason for installing window first is that windows automatically assumes it is the only OS and will overwrite any bootload on the system without any prompts, by installing windows first, then ubuntu it allows ubuntu to replace windows' bootloader.

The same bootloader issue may be experienced when you upgrade your windows installation, if that does happen you can consult your Linux distro's documentation to find the procedures for reinstalling the bootloader.

The primary licensing issue is with DVD decoders because they are using a hack to for decryption of a DVD, this is a potential legal issue because they are not using an officially purphased decryption key. The other formats generally do not have issues, except for maybe the ipod music format which is a lot of security tied to it that blocks them from playing on non-approved devices.

Defragmentation is only necessary in windows
Most Linux based filesystems automatically scan the hard drives between uses for corruptions and correct them when possible
Most viri infect windows only, in general the is very little virus threat on non-windows systems, but anti-virus software is available in both free and paid versions
spyware cannot install itself on non-windows systems
the registry is a window component, without it administration is quite simplified
PC speed utilities are not really necessary unless you are overclocking, but there are general built-in utilities for monitoring performance

In general the core of non-windows operating systems are pretty easy to handle if they are setup correctly, your administrative efforts will need to be focused on installing security updates which is easily automated on most distros.

Most wireless mice are plug-and-play on Linux based systems, if the drivers are in the kernel it will be auto-recognized. You will only need to think about programming if no drivers are available.

Link to this post 14 Mar 11

instead of kubuntu I think you should just go with ubuntu. I never used kubuntu, but I do know I have ran into weird errors on some of the ubuntu based systems that weren't ubuntu. For example Zorin OS4 which is based on ubuntu, it's basically ubuntu with a different desktop to make it look like windows and some other optional software pre-installed like Wine and PlayOnLinux, both of which are easy to install through the software center.

In the begining I would have recommended zorin just because it's made just to be easier on windows people, like myself. However for some reason even tho it's ubuntu based, I ran into a bunch of weird errors installing it on my fiance's computer, where ubuntu installed perfectly fine on it. Zorin installed fine on my computer, so I don't know what the change was, her hardware is sufficient for a 64 bit system.

Anyway, i'd recommend ubuntu because that's what I use and the community for it great and huge, as well as the company behind it.

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