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Creating Articles and Tutorials on Linux.com

There are two types of articles that can be added to the Linux.com: a community blog entry and a standard article. For more information on how to use the MyBlog system to create your own blog on Linux.com, visit the Community Blog Guide.

If you submit a tutorial or other general article to Linux.com, you will earn 20 Guru points in our Become the Next Ultimate Guru program. To submit an article to Linux.com, log into Linux.com and click the Submit an Article link in the My Account menu on your profile home page.

On the Submit an Article page, you will find an easy-to-use WYSIWYG editor that will allow you to enter a complete article on the Linux.com site. After you have entered the Title and body of the article, click Save and the editorial staff will be notified of the article submission. After review and editing, we will post the article in the appropriate section of Linux.com.

Some hints to make submittals more efficient:

  • Use the HTML Editor tool to enter HTML-formatted content. The simpler the HTML, the better.
  • If you have images, link them from a source site, such as your own site or a third-part imaging site such as Flickr.

While we will try to publish all articles submitted, there will be some articles that simply won't be ready to publish. Here are some guidelines to help make your articles more publishable. For more information, visit our Editorial Policy page.

  • Use English. Eventually we may make Linux.com a multi-lingual site, but for now, please keep articles and other content in English.
  • Focus on a single idea. Instead of "how to use digital cameras," perhaps write "how to use application X to organize your photos."
  • Use a recipe format. After a little preliminary info, use numbered steps. Make the first sentence of the step the action and the second sentence the result.
  • Use graphics. Screenshots are good. Make sure no artwork is wider then 400 px wide.
  • A long, preformated line of text will break out of the main content column. Try to keep them short.
  • Try not to be redundant. Make sure the content is original and not reproducing a topic that is already posted on Linux.com. Duplicate topics that overlap too much will not be published, so check the site first before working on your content. Also, if you have an idea, e-mail us at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it first. We'll let you know if any one else is planning on writing about that topic already, and give you some ideas on what else you could write about.
  • Tone down the foul language. You can say what you need to say without relying on cursing. In fact, your writing will be regarded as that much more creative.
The Linux Foundation is providing a framework for discussion and user generated information to expand the knowledge base of Linux information. Please note that articles, as well as any other user content on Linux.com (such as blogs, directory content, forums, comments, etc.), do not reflect the views or endorsements of the Linux Foundation, its staff, or its members. We recognize there may be inaccurate information reflected in this site and that users should understand that something that appears  on Linux.com does not mean the Linux Foundation has vetted or endorsed that content.
 

Comments

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  • James Said:

    FYI, there are some 404 links on this page admin :)

  • Mike Wentworth Said:

    The Community blog link doesn't work. Please update this tutorial or have a "Create a Community Blog" icon. Not clear at all.

  • sddfhshfui hui Said:

    holi syo no tengo noviaa :p

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