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  • yes, from the command line there is fsck.

    /sbin/fsck on my distributions.

    for example
    % sudo /sbin/fsck -t ext3 /dev/sdb1

    as a word of caution: unmount the file system first! do a man fsck and read about it.

    Answered by derrickdp
    3 years ago
    0 1
  • No, chkdsk is available from within recovery console in wind2000 / XP. Equivalent is fsck.... but don't tun this command on mounted volume / filesystem. It is better to run by this command like:
    /sbin/shutdown -r -F now
    It helps to forcefully reboot system & run fsck in interactive mode. For more info type as: man fsck

    Answered by rechil_colin
    3 years ago
    0 1
  • Yes, Linux has an equivalent tool for chkdsk. You may run fsck from your terminal and let it check your filesystem and optionally fix it depending on the parameters you type in your terminal.

    Answered by carlex
    3 years ago
    0 1
  • Yes, from the command line there is fsck. /sbin/fsck on my distributions. for example %sudo /sbin/fsck -t ext3 /dev/sdb1

    As a word of caution: unmount the file system first!
    Do %man fsck and read about it.

    Answered by derrickdp
    3 years ago
    0 0
  • On Linux systems you will be using the command "fsck". The command fsck stands for "file system check" and can be used with a variety of different file systems including ext2/3/4 and ReiserFS. As a standard user you can type the following at the command prompt to learn more:

    $ man fsck

    However, in order to perform a file system check using this command, you will have to be root or run sudo fsck.

    Some GUI tools exist but this command is usually run from the command line.

    Good Luck!

    Answered by jasonehoss
    3 years ago
    0 0
  • With most file systems you can use the fsck utility. Reading the man page or this article on cyberciti should tell you more.

    Answered by jkelley
    3 years ago
    0 0
  • The equivalent of chkdsk in Linux is fsck.

    Here is the fsck man page: http://www.linuxmanpages.com/man8/fsck.8.php

    Basic usage examples: http://www.cyberciti.biz/tips/repairing-linux-ext2-or-ext3-file-system.html

    Answered by ameer
    3 years ago
    0 0
  • The function you are looking for is called fsck but this is typically for ext based file systems (ext2/3/4) which tend to be the most commonly used, for any other file systems you may want to look it up on here or google.

    Answered by bloodwraith
    3 years ago
    0 0
  • Linux and Unix do not have a program called chkdsk. It is called fsck.
    And provided the distro you are using has man pages, you can find out about any commands you are interested in by using the man command.. as such:
    man fsck

    Answered by applebloom
    3 years ago
    0 0
  • There is no for chkdsk on Linux/Unix based systems. To test file integrity a file system uses fsck when it warrants it. That is, if a power outage occurs etc. In Debian, fsck is set to check file integrity every 30 boots or so, whether it's needed or not.

    Answered by Goineasy9
    3 years ago
    0 0
  • Yes and no. Linux's version of chkdsk is called fsck. It runs automatically on start up you can find more here... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fsck

    Answered by Anarimus
    3 years ago
    0 0
  • I would think the command
    badblocks disk_to_check

    would do the same thing as chkdisk.

    Answered by illgetit
    3 years ago
    0 1
  • Yes. From a terminal, you can use the fsck program to repair disks. Most distrobutions also supply a graphical disk utility, like GParted, that can repair disks as well as set up partitions.

    Answered by hunternet93
    3 years ago
    0 0
  • Yes it does ... it is called fsck (filesystem check) and should be used like this :

    fsck /dev/device

    Answered by ruimoreira29
    3 years ago
    0 0
  • Yes. The 'chkdsk' command as you known is a check and repair file system tool. For linux you need to determine what type of file system you use, you can try use 'df' for that and then use the 'e2fsck' command to check and repair your file system. Take a time ro read the manual before use the command, it is dangerous and can corrupt your date if u don't known how to use.

    Answered by mulatinho
    3 years ago
    0 0
  • Depending on the filesystem you use there may or may not be a chkdsk-alike called fsck.. for instance fsck.ext4 is the chkdsk equivalent for ext4 file systems.
    You shouldn't need fsck for modern filesystems anyway since they have journaling functions and should be able to recover from crashes.
    If you DO chose to run fsck, be aware that you can easily unintentionally trash your filesystem

    Answered by bofhorg
    3 years ago
    0 0
  • Yes, only in Linux it's called fsck

    Answered by rkokkelk
    3 years ago
    0 0
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