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  • I am interested as well.

    Answered by Lefo
    2 years ago
    0 0
  • In ur Q, it is not clear erstwhile if u worked / working on Linux OS. Guessing, u r a Wind user, if this is true, u have to install any free flavor(Fedora/ubuntu) on ur pc and try to do tasks that u do on Windows as daily basis routine works. Try to understand Linux's Filesystems/Dir structures as well as software install/uninstall, try to install/configure network(simple peer to peer lan) and so on. Linux is strongly supported command line arguments. And of-course shell scripts that enables the daily admin task easy and automatic. Try to gather Linux related magazine/books for beginners or intermediate. When u understand that u will quiet well on Linux Os, so u can prepare to grab Linux certs.

    Answered by rechil_colin
    2 years ago
    0 0
  • Your question is a bit unclear, so perhaps you want to 1.-Know a way to get all the permissions granted on a linux box or 2.-You want to learn how to "properly manage" Linux boxes.

    If the question is number 1, the answer is the user name is "root"

    Otherwise, you will need to understand some concepts about Linux and the Linux Distros, for that purpose I recomend you to read all the literature in hand, then fetch the distro that fits your needs the best and deploy it in an experimental environment until you feel confortable enough to deploy it on more serious manner.

    Answered by ernschettino
    2 years ago
    0 0
  • Thank you for your replies. For me, I have been using Ubuntu (and currently using 12.04) for over a year on my primary PC at home. I work with Windows PC's at work (two different networks bridged).

    I would like to find a way to learn more about what a corporate level Linux System Administrator would need to know in order to oversee the daily operations of the equipment/software used within the corp setting.

    I've learned a bit about using the Command Line to copy, make directories, delete, etc. I recently found out that I'd need to learn how to write scripts, but wasn't really sure what kind of scripts and what kind of "language" I'd need to learn to do such scripting.

    I'm not a programmer, however I'm usually the "go-to" guy at work for End User support. I love working both with the Ubuntu environment and though I can't really say I'm comfortable on the Command Line, I'm absolutely not afraid of it.

    So, not sure if this helps in trying to get more information, but if there are more questions to answer I'm more than willing to do my best. :-)

    Thank you agian.

    Answered by Lefo
    2 years ago
    0 0
  • Trying to get somewhere, I found this http://ftacademy.org/materials/fsm/2 I have downloaded the book. Has anyone had experience with this particular publication? Is it worth the time to get into, or is there something better...especially for those just starting out (sort of).

    Thanks again.

    Answered by Lefo
    2 years ago
    0 0
  • You will obviously need to know how to use VNC and SSH, be proficient with grep and regex to read text streams, use tar, gzip, bzip2 and star well, list, set, and change ugo/rwx permissions, locate and read sys logs, create soft links and hard links, kernel run-time parameters, use virtual machines, networking services, runlevels, NTP servers, HTTP servers, FTP servers, manage local user accounts, using iptables, configure security on Apache, Postfix, using cron or at, adjust CPU/memory usage, among many, many other things. Using bash scripts and cron jobs in tandum on routine tasks can make your job, for the most part, simple. For programming languages, I'd recommend learning bash, Perl, sed, PHP, awk, SQL and Ruby.
    It's a long road, so good luck. :)

    Answered by SleeplessNarc
    2 years ago
    0 0
  • Thank you, DMS! That's the most concise and thorough answer I've run across, yet!

    Time to start digging in...

    Answered by Lefo
    2 years ago
    0 0
  • Now that you shared more on your interests, I personally can suggest you to take a look on the Fedora 389 Directory and Centos integration. For enterprise level deployments the very first thing you need to learn is LDAP and the tools around it. Another interesting approach is the Linux Terminal Server Project LTSP in order to have thinclients under a Linux Server.

    Anyway the road is open for a lot of new technologies we need to explore.

    Answered by ernschettino
    2 years ago
    0 0
  • I'm a software developer, so no admin of anything here, but in my current job I've had to get my hands dirty with a couple of servers. Keeping this in mind this is what I've had to learn or learn more of to be able to semi-administer development servers and a production web and database server.

    1) ssh
    2) vi (this is crucial for log analysis)
    3) grep
    4) regular expressions (although I already used this in my development)
    5) iptables
    6) general command line ( things like ls, du, df, chaining commands, pipes, etc.)
    7) bash
    8) mysql command line tools.
    9) alternatives
    10) wget
    11) how partitions work
    12) elinks (I've learned to love it :P )
    13) crontab
    14) fstab
    15) cntlm (this isn't for the server but to get my notebook working with the ISA server my bosses keep insisting on keeping)

    Can't think of anything else I've really had to use but then again I'm not really a admin as I mentioned.

    Best of luck :)

    Answered by skfroi
    2 years ago
    0 0
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