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  • Yes and No: Some games, for example some id Software games like Quake III, Quake IV and Doom III, Unreal Tournament, Cold War, and many more have Linux versions.
    Most popular games, alas, only work on Windows and occasionally on Mac OS. Some Windows games, such as Battlefield 2 or GTA Vice City, can be run on GNU/Linux with Wine or its non-free variant Cedega, which involves some unpleasant effort for the user. For a list of games known to work on Cedega, see their games database.

    Answered by GetGNULinux
    5 years ago
    0 6
  • Do you mean stuff like Tf2, Halflife 2, etc?

    Some of them work in linux with cedega or WINE (I use wine, but i didn`t test games yet.)
    Search for the "Wine app database", there is a list of how good aplications work / what you need to configure to make it work.


    I hope that helps a bit.

    Answered by Noxn
    5 years ago
    0 4
  • As for native Linux games, there are not lots, but you could give these a try...

    Saurbraten
    AssaultCube
    Unreal Tournament
    World of Goo
    Armagetron
    OpenArena
    AlienArena
    SuperTux
    SuperTuxKart
    Quake III & IV

    However, if you have games for Windows, give Wine a shot. On their site they have some tutorials and suggestions to get applications to work correctly, and each new release tends to add more support for games and applications.

    Answered by Acid1
    5 years ago
    0 5
  • Sort of. Some windows games work under Wine. Some popular games have a native Linux version avaliable, such as World of Goo. Also, try some of the more popular open source games such as Super Tux Racer, and (my favourite) Frozen Bubble. If the game you want to use doesn't work under Wine, you could always try purchasing CrossOver Games. Supposedly, they support more games than Wine.

    Answered by l33tmyst
    5 years ago
    1 0
  • I would use [url]http://www.playonlinux.com[/url] which is a script based frontend to the wine emulator. It deals with all the nitty gritty of installing a specific game or application without the hassle of going through a manual configuration.

    Answered by kirkytullins
    5 years ago
    0 1
  • It really does depend on what you want to play. I, personally, play Eve Online. I love the game, and it has a linux client. It is not perfect, but it works on my machine just fine. In fact, the only computer that I can't play Eve on is my Mac, because it is four years old.

    Answered by Licensed Orchid
    5 years ago
    0 0
  • Its not 3d and is old. But Enemy Territory

    Answered by fianno
    5 years ago
    2 0
  • I like FPS game, you can search many free, open source FPS game at google.

    Answered by yufei
    5 years ago
    0 0
  • While there aren't too many Native Linux games there always is the option to emulate Windows games (often with pretty good performance too) using Wine. For informations on which Games/Programs are supported refer to http://appdb.winehq.org/

    Answered by cdecker
    5 years ago
    0 0
  • Games on Linux usually fall into one of three categories:

    1) Open source games. These are the easiest to get hold of as they usually can be found in the repositories for your favourite distro. To see a recent list of popular open source games, find a gaming oriented distro like the linux-gamerz live disk or the fedora games project and look at their latest list of included games. Ideally all games will one day fall under this category.

    2) Native commercial games. These are popular titles that have a native linux version or installer. You can get a reasonably decent list of these at Tux Games [url]http://www.tuxgames.com/[/url]. Playing games from this category is the second best situation, although not open source, sales from tux games count towards Linux sales and may encourage developers to port more games to Linux.

    3) The translation layers. This means using a system like wine to run Windows applications. This can be a bit hit and miss, some games will run perfectly with no tweaking, some require going to a lot of trouble to get working well, some flat out won't work. The top three solutions in this area are wine, cedega and crossover office. I believe each maintains a compatibility list which can be a great help getting games working. I personally have had great success in the past with world of warcraft, starcraft and others (actually I think Blizzard games in general are pretty good). Wine is developing at a crazy speed so experiences with a game might be very different if tried a montth or so later. I personally see this as a stop gap measure which is good for enticing players and therefore market share to Linux until the gaming studios start porting games to category 2 and 1.

    I hope this helps

    Answered by alcock.james@gmail.com
    5 years ago
    0 3
  • [quote name="fianno"]Its not 3d and is old. But Enemy Territory[/quote]
    it IS 3D, the problem I recently have is the lack of sound, I think its the alsa version, it used to work before. for years. but on the other side: who has still oss...

    Answered by arno911
    5 years ago
    0 0
  • Yes possibly through wine, depending on which game.
    Sources: [url]http://www.winehq.org/[/url]

    Answered by
    5 years ago
    0 0
  • some games working using wine and some else will not work at all specially MMORPG Games ,there is Project Called playonlinux they working to bring as much as they can games from windows to work under linux,i've been playing CS "Counter Strike",COD "Call Of Duty" , RA "Red Alert" Online under Linux Using Wine

    Answered by AYAK
    5 years ago
    0 1
  • yeah bad scene

    Answered by Tarek Ahmed
    5 years ago
    1 0
  • There's not NEARLY as many games for Linux as there are for Windows, but there are still some pretty good ones. My personal favorites are
    Urban Terror, a realistic 3d shooter with several game modes. All weapons are based off real life weapons and it has some things I never even see in propriety games, for example you can actually bleed to death if you don't bandage yourself after getting shot.
    Tremulous, ok, this one is tough to explain. There are two teams, the humans and aliens. The humans buy weapons from the armory for fighting the aliens and build structures like telenodes (spawns) with the construction kit. The aliens evolve to different classes to fight the humans and build stuff as grangers.
    There are many other games, but I find these two the most fun. Sometimes a game company also releases a version for linux. (I know id Software does for a lot of their games).
    Have fun!

    Answered by ductapeinnovations
    5 years ago
    0 0
  • Take a look at [url]http://appdb.winehq.org/[/url] where you can search for lots of items, including many popular games. People will have tested them using various distributions and wine versions and given comments, ratings and help. You will be suprised just how many games work really well under wine!

    Answered by Luke
    5 years ago
    0 1
  • Hi,

    an other way is through Virtualbox. The newest Version has better 3D Supprot. [url]http://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Changelog[/url]

    Answered by saigkill
    5 years ago
    2 0
  • Gaming industry now has realized the importance of Linux and Free/Open Source Software so you will definately see more and more games coming to linux

    Answered by kunal
    5 years ago
    1 0
  • It depends on what you mean by popular, most of large game developing companies dismiss many platforms and focuses only on Microsoft Windows.

    Some of Windows games can run in Linux by using WINE, just search for it in http://appdb.winehq.org to look for its support details.

    Hopefully some games are being to GNU/Linux, the newest one is QuakeLive!

    Answered by Khalid
    5 years ago
    1 0
  • This question could go several ways, but if you want to get at the new blockbuster releases as soon as they come out then no, Linux isn't your best choice.

    However there are many games made for Linux, and many many more capable of running under WINE and it's many derivatives (Cedega, etc. ).

    I'm not trying to be a pessimist, but if you're looking for the newest releases every month ( I haven't been for years, so it doesn't bother me). You'll likely still want to keep a Win partition or virtual machine around somewhere.

    mm~

    Answered by eternalelegy
    4 years ago
    0 0
  • I suggest PlayonLinux, it's awesome. It's not perfect, but in my opinion it's the best chance you have getting a Windows game to work in Linux.

    http://www.playonlinux.com/en/

    Answered by jlacroix
    4 years ago
    0 0
  • Well, as you probably know playing games on Linux distributions is a bit tricky because all the games are first released for Windows OS. However, you can always play some good game ports which are developed for Linux or use Wine and emulate Windows games in Linux environment.

    Answered by softblogger
    8 months ago
    0 0
  • Steam for Linux...

    Answered by willytheworm
    2 weeks ago
    0 0
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