Linux.com

ACP-Modem

Linux ACP Modem (Mwave) mini-HOWTO

Mike Sullivan

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Paul Schroeder

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Joy Yokley - Edited document and coverted to DocBook v4.1 (SGML).

2001-01-12

Revision History
Revision .11 2002-07-18 Revised by: PBS
Revision .10 2001-07-18 Revised by: PBS
Revision .09 2001-05-21 Revised by: PBS
Revision .08 2001-05-09 Revised by: JEY
Revision .07 2001-04-30 Revised by: JEY

This document describes how to build, setup, and use the driver and user space application necessary for using the ACP (Mwave) Modem in the IBM Thinkpad™ 600, 600E, and 770 models which include the on board ACP modem hardware. The latest version of this document can always be found at http://www.ibm.com/linux/ltc/


1. General Information and Hardware Requirements

1.1. Introduction

The ACP Modem for Linux is a software based modem. Support software for the ACP modem is composed of a loadable kernel module and a user level application. Together these components support direct connection to public switched telephone networks (PSTNs) and support selected countries world wide. Refer to Section 6 of this document for the supported country list.

The modem also supports the standard communications port interface (ttySx) and is compatible with the Hayes AT Command Set.

ACP Modem software is continually under development. If you encounter bugs or usability issues, please contact us and we'll work to correct them.


1.7. Features of the Modem

The ACP Modem provides the following features:

  • Standard asynchronous COM port interface (NS16550A UART compatible) operation

  • Bell-103/212A, CCITT-V.21/V.22,V.22bis protocols with data from 300 to 2400 bps

  • CCITT-V.32 protocols with data rates of 4800, 9600 uncoded, and 9600 bps Trellis coded (Optional)

  • CCITT-V.32bis protocols with data rates of 4800, 9600, 12000, and 14400 bps (optional)

  • ITU-T V.34 protocols with data rates from 2400 to 33600 bps.

  • 56K capable modem

  • Hayes AT Command Set compatibility

  • DTMF and pulse dialing

  • Asynchronous error recovery protocol

  • Error correction via Microcom Network Protocol (MNP) classes 1-4

  • Error correction via the V.42 error correction standard

  • MNP class 5 for up to 2x data compression

  • V.42bis for up to 4x data compression

  • "Adaptive Rate Negotiation" which provides for "Fallback / Fallforward" as line quality deteriorates or improves

Your modem contains 56K technology. To take advantage of this technology, you must first make sure that your Internet Service Provider (ISP) supports a 56K modem protocol. Significantly higher modem connection speeds, up to 56kbps, require all-digital transmission connections from your ISP to the line card in the central office from which your phone line is connected. The actual connection rate may be limited by the quality of your telephone lines. Telephone line quality may vary from location to location. Current regulations limit maximum trasfer rates to 53K. While your modem contains 56K technology, typical maximum connection rates in the receive direction may be significantly less than 56K. Currently, 56K capability is for the receive direction only. The transmit direction uses V.34 technology.


2. Compilation, Installation, and Startup

2.1. Prerequisites

  • A 2.2.16 series (or later) Linux kernel source tree

  • An appropriate set of module utilities

  • gcc version 2.7.x or later

If you are building the ACP Modem driver along with the user space application, you need to have a complete Linux source tree for your kernel, not just an up-to-date kernel image.


2.2. Building and Installing Source

  1. Use tar xzvf mwavem-yyyymmdd.tar.gz to unpack the distribution.

  2. Change directories with cd mwavem-yyyymmdd

  3. Use the ./configure command to configure the build options. Issue ./configure --help to view all of the options. The defaults are probably okay though.

    Note NOTE
     

    As of mwavem-1.0.3 you must give ./configure the --enable-mwavedd argument in order to build the driver with the user space application.

  4. Use the make command to build all of the ACP Modem binaries.

    Note NOTE
     

    Your gcc package should be at least at the 2.7.x level. Check your /usr/src/linux/Documentation/Changes file for the minimum version information.

  5. Use make install to install the mwavem binary, mwavem.conf configuration, the extra binary (mostly .dsp) files, and module device driver (if you specified that it must be built) and to create the /dev/modems/mwave device node.


2.3. Setting Things Up

In the [WORLDTRADE] section of your mwavem.conf file, set the Country= parameter to your country access code.

Note NOTE
 

The mwavem.conf file is installed in the /usr/local/etc directory unless you specified otherwise during the build process

Country information (including access codes) are listed in the mwavem.conf file. For example, for France the following section is present:


[Telephony\Country List\33]

CountryCode=00000021

Name=France

SameAreaRule=0FG

LongDistanceRule=0FG

InternationsalRule=00EFG

To set France to be your configured country in the [WORLDTRADE] section of mwavem.conf,

set Country=33

2.4. Runtime

An initialization script has been provided which may be used to to start, stop, or check the status of the ACP Modem driver and application. It has been successfully run on the Debian, Slackware, SuSE, and Red Hat distributions and should run on any of their derivitives. If you are using the runtime script, it will load the mwave device driver module, configure the serial port, and start the mwave manager for you. All of the options which can be passed to the device driver module, along with some options for the script itself, can be configured by uncommenting and editing the appropriate variables at the beginning of the script.

The mwaved startup script can be found in the src/mwavem directory of the source distribution. If you are running the Red Hat distribution, you can copy the script to your /etc/rc.d/init.d directory and issue the ntsysv command in order to enable it at boot time. If not using Red Hat, see the documentation for your distribution for information on how to set this up to run at boot time.

It is recommended that you use the provided mwaved script. If you are not using the script, however, the following sections will describe how to manually start the device driver and application.


2.4.1. Loading the ACP device driver

To load the mwave device driver use

insmod mwave
or
modprobe mwave

The following arguments may be supplied with the insmod command:

Note NOTE
 

The following arguments are not persistent from boot to boot (i.e. We are not saving them in the BIOS).

  • mwave_3780i_irq=5/7/10/11/15

    This parameter allows you to configure the IRQ used by the DSP if the DSP IRQ was not set and stored in BIOS by the Thinkpad™ configuration utility.

  • mwave_3780i_io=0x130/0x350/0x0070/0xDB0

    This parameter allows you to configure the I/O range used by the DSP if the DSP I/O range was not set and stored in the BIOS by the Thinkpad™ configuration utility.

  • mwave_uart_irq=3/4

    This parameter allows you to configure the IRQ used by the ACP UART if the Mwave's UART IRQ was not set and stored in BIOS by the Thinkpad™ configuration utility.

  • mwave_uart_io=0x3f8/0x2f8/0x3E8/0x2E8

    This parameter allows you to configure the I/O range used by the ACP UART if the UART I/O range was not set and stored in BIOS by the Thinkpad™ configuration utility.

The following code is an example of how to run DSP using ttyS1 resources:

insmod mwave mwave_3780i_irq=10 mwave_3780i_io=0x0130 mwave_uart_irq=3 mwave_uart_io=0x2f8
Note NOTE
 

The mwave is unable to check for resource conflicts. It is your responsibility to ensure that none of the resources specified conflict with other (commonly PCMCIA) devices.

You can use the tpctl package on Linux or the Thinkpad™ configuration utility on Windows NT or DOS to manage the configuration of Thinkpad™ related resources.


2.4.2. Running ACP Modem Application

  1. Once the ACP device driver is loaded successfully, use the mwavem command to execute the application.

    Note NOTE
     

    The location of the mwavem.conf file can be specified as an argument to the mwavem application. If not specified the default location is assumed to be /usr/local/etc/mwavem.conf unless otherwise changed during the build process.

  2. Setup the serial driver to recognize the UART provided by the ACP driver.

    setserial /dev/ttyS0 autoconfig
    
    Note NOTE
     

    Substitute /dev/ttyS0 to match the serial port you have configured the DSP to use.

    Note NOTE
     

    You may wish to create a symbolic link from your modem device to your serial device for convenience. Example: ln -s /dev/ttyS0 /dev/modem

The ACP Modem is now available for use by your favorite dialing application.


3. Resolving Installation and Configuration Problems

The following sections list solutions to possible problems you may experience.


3.1. DSP Does Not Start

In order to recognize memory above 64 Meg, it may be necessary to append the "mem=" option to the kernel command line. If you are using LILO for your boot loader, you would do this in the lilo.conf file. For example, if you had a machine with 128 Meg you would type:

append="mem=130496K"
Note NOTE
 

Your statement must reflect 576K less than you actually have. Specifying the full amount of memory will prevent the DSP from starting. In the above example, the formula used to arrive at the proper number was 1024 * nMB - 576 = nK.

If you forget to run the Thinkpad™ utility to enable the ACP Modem and you didn't specify any command line arguments when inserting the mwave module (or it didn't work), you will receive a message in the syslog, similar to the one below:

ACP Modem, UART settings IRQ 0x3       IO 0x2f8

tp3780::EnableDSP, pSettings->bDSPEnabled 0 failed

Mwave Modem, ERROR cannot Enable DSP error fffffffb

Mwave Modem, ERROR cannot perform Mwave Initialization retval fffffffb

If you receive a message like the one above, check the command line arguments you provided to insmod.


3.2. Resource Conflicts

The ACP Modem requires the use of system resources for both the DSP and the UART provided by the ACP chip. For Linux systems, you will specify parameters to use for the duration of the boot with the insmod mwave command line parameters listed in Section 2.4.1.

Typically the configured resources are:

For the DSP:  IRQ 10, I/O address 0x130-0x13f

For the UART: IRQ 3,  I/O address 0x2f8 (if using ttyS1)

                                  IRQ 4,  I/O address 0x3f8 (if using ttyS0)

For dual boot systems we recommeded that you use the Thinkpad™ Configuration Utility on Windows NT or DOS to configure these system resources.

Windows NT Thinkpad Configuration Utility Notes: (Under the Internal Modem --> Advanced selection)

  1. Set IRQ sharing to disabled

  2. Set 1st IRQ to your DSP IRQ (10 is recommened)

  3. Set 2nd IRQ to your UART IRQ (i.e. ttyS1 is equivalent to COM2)

  4. Set the DSP I/O address (0x130 is recommended)

  5. Set the internal modem I/O address to the UART I/O address (i.e. 0x2f8 for COM2)

  6. The DMA address is unused and can be set to anything.

Note NOTE
 

You may also specify parameters to use for the duration of the boot by using the insmod mwave line parameters listed in section Section 2.4.1.


4. Debugging Tips


4.2. Tracing

The ACP device driver supports a debug argument to enable the generation of trace information. The command for this debug is listed below. You can also access several of the variables listed below in the mwaved script.

insmod mwave mwave_debug=0x0f

Where the following debug trace information is selectable:

0x01   ACP Modem Device driver entry points

0x02    Systems Management API(SMAPI)

0x04    Hardware Interface (3780I)

0x08    Thinkpad Interface (tp3780i)

Trace information is logged using the syslog utility.

The ACP application supports tracing through the use of flags configured in the [STARTUP] section of the mwavem.conf file.

Mwave Manager API trace points:

MANAGER_API_TRACE=1

MANAGER_API_DATA_TRACE=1

MANAGER_CORE_TRACE=1

MANAGER_SPECIFIC_TRACE=1

MEIO Manager trace points:

MEIO_API_TRACE=1

MEIO_CORE_TRACE=1

MEIO_SPECIFIC_TRACE=1

Mwave Modem application trace points:

MWMLW32_TRACE=1

MWMPW32_TRACE=1

MWMUTIL_TRACE=1

MWWTT32_TRACE=1

Trace information is logged using the syslog utility.


6. List of Supported Countries

The following countries are supported by the ACP Modem driver

Table 1. List of Supported Countries

Country Name Country Access Code
ALGERIA 213
ANTIGUA_BARBUDA 102
ARGENTINA 54
ARMENIA 374
ARUBA 297
AUSTRALIA 61
AUSTRIA 43
AZERBAIJAN 994
BAHAMAS 103
BARBADOS 104
BELARUS 375
BELGIUM 32
BERMUDA 105
BOLIVIA 591
BRAZIL 55
BRUNEI 673
BULGARIA 359
CANADA 107
CAYMAN_ISLANDS 108
CHILE 38
COLOMBIA 57
COSTA_RICA 506
CUBA 53
CYPRUS 357
CZECHREPUBLIC 420
DENMARK 45
ECUADOR 593
EGYPT 20
EL_SALVADOR 503
FINLAND 358
FRANCE 33
GERMANY 49
GREECE 30
GRENADA 111
GUATEMALA 502
GUYANA 592
HONDURAS 504
HONG_KONG 852
HUNGARY 36
INDIA 91
INDONESIA 62
IRELAND 353
ISRAEL 972
ITALY 39
JAMAICA 112
JAPAN 81
JORDAN 962
KOREA 850
KOREA_SOUTH 82
KUWAIT 965
LUXEMBOURG 352
MALAYSIA 60
MEXICO 52
NETH_ANTILLES 599
NETHERLANDS 31
NEW_ZEALAND 64
NICARAGUA 505
NORWAY 47
OMAN 968
PAKISTAN 92
PANAMA 507
PARAGUAY 595
PERU 51
PHILIPPINES 63
POLAND 48
PORTUGAL 351
PRC 852
ROMANIA 40
RUSSIA 7
SAUDI_ARABIA 966
SINGAPORE 65
SLOVAKIA 421
SLOVENIA 386
SOUTH_AFRICA 27
SPAIN 34
ST_KITTS_NEVIS 115
ST_LUCIA 122
ST_VINCENT 116
SURINAME 597
SWEDEN 46
SWITZERLAND 41
TAIWAN 866
THAILAND 66
TRINIDAD_TOBAGO 117
TURKEY 90
TURKS_CAICOS 118
U_K 44
UKRAINE 380
UNITED_ARAB_EMIRATES 971
URUGUAY 598
USA 1
VENEZUELA 58
VIETNAM 84
VIRGIN_IS_BRITISH 106
VIRGIN_IS_USA 123
YEMAN 967
YUGOSLAVIA 381
 

Comments

Subscribe to Comments Feed

Who we are ?

The Linux Foundation is a non-profit consortium dedicated to the growth of Linux.

More About the foundation...

Frequent Questions

Join / Linux Training / Board