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IPv6 Creates Opportunity for Linux in Embedded Computing: A Case Study

We recently profiled Compunetix, who delivers audio conferencing solutions to military agencies and their move from a proprietary embedded OS to Linux. Their migration was precipatated by a mandate by the U.S. Department of Defense that all products it purchases have iPv6 support. Our Linux Foundation Training Program helped Compunetix make the move to Linux through custom embedded Linux training.  As Ferhat Cakrak, the Software Development Team Manager at Compunetix, says: “IPv6 is increasingly important in many industries—especially ours. But it’s not easy to implement in a proprietary OS.” A few...

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Quotes From The Linux Foundation Enterprise End User Summit

For the past two days, we've held our annual Enterprise End User Summit at the New York Stock Exchange. Besides the fun of ringing the bell during our evening reception, it's been an incredibly valuable event, fueling collaboration between kernel maintainers and enterprise end users who are pushing Linux to its edge.   Here are highlights: “We’re not going to use our APIs to lock people out. Trust and security are at the heart of everything we do.” Stanley Young, CEO of NYSE Technologies “if there is one community who has embraced collaboration and openness,...

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Introducing CloudOpen: Why Now and Why The Linux Foundation?

I am pleased to announce CloudOpen, our new conference celebrating and exploring the open source projects, technologies and companies who make up the cloud. CloudOpen will bring together the open source projects, products and companies that are driving the cloud and big data ecosystems today and present best practices from the world of traditional open source.

You may be asking yourself, "Why another cloud event?" There are certainly no shortage of them, which isn't surprising given the nascent stage of an important new market segment. But  there was nothing that I felt focused on the open source technologies and the open source way behind the cloud.

This event began when developers from various cloud-related projects came to me and said, "We should probably be talking to each other." The Linux Foundation's role in the industry is to facilitate collaboration amongst developers, projects, companies and users. The cloud and the open source technologies that comprise it are now reaching the point of maturity that this collaboration can truly benefit users. Cloud infrastructure choice is also reaching the point of proliferation that users need to have a place to educate themselves on "open" as it relates to the cloud. And this isn't just at a source level: the conversation must include data policies, APIs and so on. The Linux Foundation can provide the neutral forum and the platform for this conversation on open to take place. 

I feel truly blessed to have assembled many leaders of cloud computing for the program committee:

  • Greg DeKoenigsberg, vice president of community, Eucalyptus Systems
  • Mark Hinkle, director of cloud computing community, Citrix
  • Gerrit Huzienga, cloud architect, IBM
  • Amanda McPherson, vice president of marketing and developer services, The Linux Foundation
  • Stefano Maffulli, community manager, OpenStack
  • Stephen Spector, cloud evangelist, Dell
  • John Mark Walker, director of communities, Red Hat

These indivuals represent the right technologies and also have the right background in open source to create a truly useful event. Expect content on cloud platforms, virtualization projects, storage, devops best practices and more. There will also be collaborative meetings between open cloud projects. 

I want to thank the platinum sponsors of CloudOpen who are supporting this work: Canonical, HP, IBM, Intel. The Linux Foundation is a non-profit who needs the support of companies to make collaboration possible. And in an event landscape where prices continue to climb, we try to make our events affordable for a broad group of people. These sponsors help us to do that. 

The CFP deadline is June 1 so please submit a talk if you would like to participate. Early bird registration ends on April 29th so please register. This year one registration gets you into both LinuxCon and CloudOpen. San Diego is truly shaping up to be an unforgettable gathering of the leaders behind open source. LinuxCon, CloudOpen, the Xen Summit, the Linux Kernel Summit, The Linux Plumbers Conference and more will all be there during the week. We hope you'll join us. 

 

 
 

Miss our Collaboration or Legal Summits? Here are some resources

Last week, we had our biggest turn-out ever for our Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit and our Legal Summit held immediately before. Collab has come a long way since the first meeting in 2007 at the Googleplex. While some of the issues and players have changed at heart the result is the same: a cross-section of people from the industry and community who may otherwise not meet collaborating together. We have assembled slides and videos from the week so if you weren't able to join us, please enjoy.  I especially enjoyed Feargal O'Sullivan from NYSE's talk on OpenMama, the legal track on...

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Announcing New Open Compliance Template

Almost two years ago, The Linux Foundation launched the Open Compliance Program to help companies manage their end-to-end open source license compliance processes.  We have continually added papers, training, tutorials, and dedicated Legal/Compliance session tracks at conferences like Collaboration Summit to help make compliance processes easier to understand, and more cost-effective to implement.

Today, we are releasing a new template that will help companies manage the flow of data through the compliance process.

License compliance best practices require complete and accurate information about FOSS components being incorporated into the software supply chain. This requires a continual focus on ensuring the right information is collected and archived when a new FOSS component is to be introduced into a software product, from initial request to final shipment.

To help with this process we've just published a template for collecting information about a FOSS component and its usage, so that when a request is made to the company's internal open source review board, it can be easily and thoroughly evaluated.  This template will also help development organizations spend less time re-submitting missing data, and a standardized format can accelerate the approval process.

We will publish additional templates for usage guidelines, due diligence on a supplier's FOSS compliance practices, and more over the coming months.  In the meantime, we encourage you to download and reuse the request template.  And as always, if you need additional guidance on designing your FOSS compliance program, we can help with that too.

 
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