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Open Cloud Roundup: Top Stories of the Week

Our Digital Content Editor Libby Clark is away from the office this week, so I'm bringing you the Linux.com Open Cloud Roundup. The release of ownCloud 4, and the data surfaced from the Future of Open Source survey provide some interesting news bits this week, while Reuven Cohen and Matt Asay both make interesting points about the trajectory of cloud computing in their blogs.

Build Your Own Open Source Cloud with ownCloud 4

ZDNet

Steven Vaughan-Nichols writes a useful review of this week's ownCloud 4 release, pointing to its ease-of-use and saying that "ownCloud brings everything I need in one place so that I can run my own cloud my own way." The best thing about ownCloud is you can keep all your data on your own servers and choose the other public clouds with which you want to integrate. 

Open Source Finds its Way into Mobile, Cloud, Big Data

eWeek

A group of open source software companies this week released The Future of Open Source Survey, which we covered here at Linux.com. One of the interesting findings that eWeek surfaced in their story lead is that 40 percent of new open source projects in 2011 address cloud computing (followed by mobile apps and mobile enterprise projects). This reflects the importance of Linux and open source software in enabling an open cloud experience for IT users who need interoperability, low costs and flexibility.

Interest in Cloud Computing Has Peaked

Forbes.com

Reuven Cohen makes a case, based on web search data, that interest in the cloud has peaked. He shares data that shows web searches for cloud computing terms are down and points to Gartner's Hype Cycle to illustrate we're headed into the phase defined as the "trough of disillusionment." This is when the real winners and losers are exposed and real products start coming to market and real deployments can be analyzed from start to finish. The next phase? "Slope of enlightenment." We can't wait.

Red Hat Could Cash In With Open Source Cloud Juggling Act

The Register

While this post is a summary of Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst's OSBC keynote, Matt Asay makes some really important points about the role of Linux and open source software in the cloud. Here are just a couple excerpts:

"Cloud computing is all the rage these days, but it's really a natural consequence of the open-source trend that started decades ago. Cloud computing is essentially impossible in any major way without open-source software at its heart, a point Google has stressed for years. The economics just don't work without high-quality free software with minimal licensing friction."

"We see this in the explosion of interest in Big Data, but that's just the sexy, Silicon Valley way of articulating the shift toward information-driven businesses. Those businesses can only afford to be so information-driven, however, because of how open source and other technology forces have dramatically lowered the cost of computing and communication."

Seems to me we need to ask Matt to do another Q&A with us here on Linux.com about this topic (hint hint, Matt).

Until next week.

 

 

 

How to Become a Finalist: Inspired by Linux T-shirt Design Contest

I'm inspried by a variety of things, both small and large: a really good cup of coffee, great art, contribution, reading the Sunday New York Times, sitting in the Linux kernel panel session at LinuxCon. But this year in particular, I'm more inpsired than ever by what is happening because of Linux. The Raspberry Pi is putting computing power in anyone's hands; the Cadillac Cue is illustrating just the tip of the iceberg of what Linux is doing for car infotainment systems; and Google, Facebook and Amazon all continue to push the limits on how we connect as a global culture thanks to Linux. This year, too, Linux is playing a major role in how we define the open cloud and is bringing more attention to why we need to fight for openness in cloud computing.

All of these reasons and more are why we created a theme for this year's Linux Foundation T-shirt contest, "Inspired by Linux." My colleague Libby Clark last week shared a video that gives me goosebumps and that we can already see by the submissions coming in are inspiring people to design this year's T-shirt. To provide even more inspiration and direction on how to become a finalist, I thought I'd share last year's finalists. I hope this helps designers understand the basic elements we're lookging for when choosing the top 5-7 for community vote: artistic quality, originality, creativity, simplicity in design, and adherence to the contest theme. Enjoy the slideshow, and we look forward to reviewing your design. And, to this year's two winners-to-be, we'll see you at LinuxCon and CloudOpen!

 

 

Big Data, Cloud Knowledge Key in IT Jobs Market

As a global community, we are creating and sharing more information than ever before. And, most of that activity is happening "in the cloud," which is hosted on millions of servers in datacenters located anywhere from the Columbia River Gorge, to the Nevada desert, to the most remote areas of China.

As the reality of managing that level of data sets in, the demand for employees with a unique combination of analytics and IT management expertise is on the rise. With our newest event, CloudOpen, taking place this coming summer, we wanted to learn more about this demand and the areas we should address at this event and as part of our ongoing Linux training program. So, we got in touch with Dice.com's Managing Director Alice Hill. Her responses were very useful and we thought we'd share them with you, the community.

Linux.com: We've been reading a lot about an increasing demand for professionals with big data expertise. What's your take on the primary drivers behind this trend?

Alice Hill, Dice.com
Hill:
Every company wants more intelligence – more insights into customer behavior, emerging trends, cost structures, etc.  Many firms have the data, but it’s unused, unstructured and isn’t easily digestible by managers to make decisions.  If companies can develop this asset, it will give them an edge in the market and potentially influence customer behaviors.  

Linux.com: What kinds of expertise are employers looking for related to big data?

Hill: Data architects, analytics professionals and data scientists are high on the list right now. Employers are requesting experience with machine learning, statistics, and natural language processing.  Big data takes that foundation and marries that know-how to newer technologies like Hadoop and NoSQL and other open-source tools/technologies.  

Linux.com: You recently reported that demand for Linux talent hit an all-time high on the Dice.com boards. Do you see any parallels with the demand for big data talent?

Hill: About one-third of the “big data” jobs on Dice also request Linux expertise. The employment demand for Linux expertise is much more widespread and it’s really a core skill for technology professionals today.

Linux.com: We've heard that a big data expert is likely someone with a hybrid of expertise, including business and technical acumen. How are employers dealing with this challenge?

Hill: That’s true and we see more and more job postings on Dice.com that note an MBA is a plus. However, it’s not just the technology departments’ responsibility to gain business acumen. The line of business leaders need to have a willingness to dig into the technologies and ask questions when they don’t fully comprehend the back-end of getting the insights everyone wants.  

For newer technologists, whether focused on big data or other areas, you should be able to “story board” what the business needs, contribute to the story, understand the financial analysis and deliver it in a way that is easily understood by any audience. This is where we should spend time teaching our less experienced colleagues.  

Linux.com: What advice do you have for professionals seeking a career in the area of big data?

Hill: Focus on working with internet companies with consumer audiences – ecommerce, gaming, etc.  Those firms have enormous data streams matched by a serious craving to use the data.  Ultimately, though don’t fit your career into a trend – you should do what you are best at for real satisfaction.  

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In Pictures: Linux Foundation Enterprise End User Summit

The Linux Foundation's Enterprise End User Summit kicked off yesterday in New York. The event this year is hosted at the NYSE Technologies' offices. It brings together Linux kernel developers and the world's largest users of Linux to collaborate face-to-face. The evening party was held on the trading floor of the NYSE, and we have some pictures available now that take you inside the event.

 

That's a Wrap: 2012 Linux Foundation Collab Summit Pictures

The day after one of The Linux Foundation events is always a bit like the day after a really great party: you're exhausted but in a good way. You're recounting all the great conversations you had and looking forward to the next time you get to see everyone again (perhaps, Enterprise End User Summit, LinuxCon Japan and/or LinuxCon North America).

To help get you through to the next time, and for those of you who are waiting to see everyone and collaborate in person again, here is another slideshow with some new pictures from The Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit 2012.

 
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