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kdbus details

Now that linux.conf.au is over, there has been a bunch of information running around about the status of kdbus and the integration of it with systemd. So, here’s a short summary of what’s going on at the moment. Lennart Poettering gave a talk about kdbus at linux.conf.au. The talk can be viewed here, and the slides are here. Go read the slides and watch the talk, odds are, most of your questions will be answered there already. For those who don’t want to take the time watching the talk, lwn.net wrote up a great summary of the talk, and that article is here. For those of you without a lwn.net subscription, what are you waiting for? You’ll have to wait two weeks before it comes out from behind the paid section of the website before reading it, sorry. There will be a systemd hack-fest a few days before FOSDEM, where we should hopefully pound out the remaining rough edges on the codebase and get it ready to be merged. Lennart will also be giving his kdbus talk again at FOSDEM if anyone wants to see it in person. The kdbus code can be found in two places, both on google code, and on github, depending on where you like to browse things. In a few weeks we’ll probably be creating some patches and submitting it for inclusion in the main kernel, but more testing with the latest systemd code needs to be done first. If you want more information about the kdbus interface, and how it works, please see the kdbus.txt file for details. Binder vs. kdbus A lot of people have asked about replacing Android’s binder code with kdbus. I originally thought this could be done, but as time has gone by, I’ve come to the conclusion that this will not happen with the first version of kdbus, and possibly can never happen. First off, go read that link describing binder that I pointed to above, especially all of the links to different resources from that page. That should give you more than you ever wanted to know about binder. Short answer Binder is bound to the CPU, D-Bus (and hence kdbus), is bound to RAM. Long answer Binder Binder is an interface that Android uses to provide synchronous calling (CPU) from one task to a thread of another task. There is no queueing involved in these calls, other than the caller process is suspended until...

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Booting a Self-Signed Linux Kernel

Now that The Linux Foundation is a member of the UEFI.org group, I’ve been working on the procedures for how to boot a self-signed Linux kernel on a platform so that you do not have to rely on any external signing authority. 

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Longterm Kernel 3.10

As I’ve discussed in the past, I will be selecting one “longterm stable” kernel release every year, and maintain that kernel release for at least two years. Despite the fact that the 3.10-stable kernel releases are not slowing down at all, and there are plenty of pending patches already lined up for the next few releases, I figured it was a...

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3.10 Linux Kernel Development Rate

While working on the latest statistics for the yearly Linux Foundation “Who Writes Linux” paper, I noticed the rate-of-change for the 3.10 kernel release that just happened this weekend: Every year I think we can’t go faster, and every year I’m wrong. Note, the “number of employers” row is not...

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How to Create a sysfs File Correctly

One common Linux kernel driver issue that I see all the time is a driver author attempting to create a sysfs file in their code by doing something like:

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