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The Next 20 Years? Who Knows?

Jim Whitehurst, CEO of Red Hat, took the stage in Vancouver, BC to talk about the challenges that Linux will face in the next 20 years. Whitehurst's topic meshed nicely with the lead-in keynote from Jim Zemlin. While Zemlin examined the world without Linux, Whitehurst took a look at the next stage — Linux over the next 20 years.

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MeeGo IVI Achieves GENIVI Compliance

I am very excited to share with the community and industry that MeeGo is among the first operating system offerings that have officially been certified by GENIVI to be compliant. This is another great milestone in the collaboration between GENIVI and MeeGo. In July 2010, The Linux Foundation and GENIVI announced that MeeGo is the platform of choice for GENIVI. Both GENIVI software releases, Apollo (October 2010) and Borg (May 2011) utilize MeeGo IVI releases 1.1 and 1.2, respectively, as their foundation and add GENIVI-specific packages.

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LinuxCon, 20th Anniversary of Linux Celebration Kicks Off

Today is a big day for the Linux community. I’m writing this from Vancouver, B.C. where Users, SysAdmins, developers and business executives have gathered for the third annual LinuxCon and the official celebration of the 20th Anniversary of Linux.

This week is about celebrating as a community the accomplishments of the last 20 years and to collaborate on how we advance Linux for another 20 years. We’re lucky to have the foremost experts on these topics on hand at LinuxCon: Linux creator Linus Torvalds, Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst, legal authority Eben Moglen, IBM Linux leader Dan Frye and others. Renowned Internet and society author Clay Shirky will share how Linux and collaborative development have spread into other areas of culture and what that means for the future of technology.

These are just a few examples of the speakers and content we’re looking forward to today through Friday. It’s also a natural time to reflect on how Linux user behaviors have changed over the last two decades. We recently conducted a survey of our registered LinuxCon attendees and learned some interesting things about the differences between Linux usage a decade ago versus how...

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Open Compliance Program Celebrates One-Year Anniversary

LinuxCon North America opens this week in Vancouver, with a centerpiece celebration of the 20th anniversary of Linux.  The Linux Foundation’s Open Compliance Program celebrates a milestone, too:   its one-year anniversary.

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Future of the -longterm kernel releases.

tl;dr; -stable kernel releases stay the same this proposal is how we pick the -longterm releases -longterm kernels will be picked every year, and maintained for 2 years before being dropped. the same Documentation/stablekernelrules.txt will apply for -longterm kernels, as before. History: 2.6.16 became a "longterm" kernel because my day job (at SUSE) picked the 2.6.16 kernel for its "enterprise" release and it made things a lot easier for me to keep working at applying bugfixes and other stable patches to it to make my job simpler (applying a known-good bunch of patches in one stable update was easier than a set of smaller patches that were only tested by a smaller group of people.) Seeing that this worked well, a cabal of developers got together at a few different Linux conferences and determined that based on their future distro release cycles, we could all aim for standardizing on the 2.6.32 kernel, saving us all time and energy in the long run. We turned around and planted the proper seeds within the different organizations and low-and-behold, project managers figured that this was their idea and sold it to the rest of the groups and made it happen. Right now all of the major "enterprise" and "stable" distro releases are based on the 2.6.32 kernel, making this trial a huge success. Last year, two different community members (Andi and Paul) asked me if they could maintain the 2.6.34 and 2.6.35 kernels as -longterm kernel releases as their companies needed...
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