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Microsoft’s Tablet Strategy and How Linux Compares

Last week at CES, Microsoft announced their answer to the iPad with their tablet strategy. Computerworld says, “Microsoft has decided not to follow the Apple and Google route of putting its mobile operating system on tablets. Instead, Microsoft has chosen a more deliberate method where it will migrate its client OS onto tablets.” Microsoft also announced it will wait until its port of Windows 7 to ARM chips is complete. Pundits have criticized this strategy as being out-dated in today’s fast moving tablet market. What exactly are they criticizing? 1. The time it will take for Microsoft to ready this system. Because Microsoft is waiting for its next release cycle, this Windows Tablet OS isn’t expected until 2012. That’s a lifetime in a  market like this. 2. Microsoft is taking a desktop client and force fitting it into a tablet form factor. That likely means tablets running Windows will need more processor power and have shorter battery...

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Linux Powering Your Cell Phone Network: A Case Study

We’ve talked a lot about the rise of Linux in embedded devices lately: from our embedded Linux training classes to the Yocto and Meego projects, to a new Linux Foundation fellow. But what about the end users, the people who are deploying Linux in their products? We just published a Linux training case study on Optelian, a company who designs and manufacturers optical transport systems that send data across optical fiber. That means if you connect your Android phone (or iPhone or IPad or Blackberry) to a telecom carrier in North America (and if you don’t, why do own one of those devices?), you’re likely making use of Optelian’s handywork. It’s yet another example of  “Linux is everywhere.” This time it’s in your phone (in Android’s case) as well as the...

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Oracle Q&A: A Refresher on Unbreakable Linux Kernel

Oracle caused quite a stir in 2010 when it announced its Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel for Oracle Linux. With the New Year upon us, we checked in with the company to get a refresher on the ABCs of this important introduction as well as the company's latest take on Linux...

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Linux.com Gift Card Winners Announced

Before we begin the important business of 2011, we want to share with you the winners of our Individual Membership drive and promotion.

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Is Nokia Doomed?

There’s been a lot of discussion regarding whether or not Nokia is Doomed or not.   The people who say Nokia are doomed basically point out that Nokia doesn’t have any attractive products at the high end, and at the low end the margins are extremely thin.  The high end products suffer from the Symbian being essentially dead (even Nokia is recommending that developers not develop native applications for Symbian, but to use Qt instead), and Nokia doesn’t have much of a development community following it, and it certainly does have much in the way of 3rd party applications, either targetting Symbian or Qt at the moment. So what do I think of the whole debate between Tomi and Scoble?  First of all, I think there is a huge difference in American and European assumptions and perspectives, and a big question is whether the rest of the world will end up looking more like Europe or America vis-a-vis two key areas: cost of data plans, and whether phones become much more application centric. Tomi’s 2nd article, in response to Scoble’s, “Nokia is still doomed” post, was quite interesting to me, especially in the comments where he takes Apple to task for not having an SD card slot (how else would people share photos with their friends?) and for not supporting MMS in its earlier phones.   My first reaction?  Um, isn’t that what photo-sharing sites are for?    Is it really that hard to attach a photo to an e-mail?  And then it hit me.   In Europe, data is still like MMS a few years ago — a place for rapacious carriers to make way too much money.  Many European telco’s don’t have unlimited data plans, and charge by the megabyte — and even if you’re lucky...

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