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Self-Assessment Checklist: First Impressions After Release

The Linux Foundation has received initial feedback on the Self-Assessment Checklist, and it has been gratifyingly positive. I’d like to share with you some observations based on comments received so far. People recognize that the checklist is not an end in itself, but a compilation of recommended compliance practices to guide and inform process improvement efforts... 

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Working on Technology at Startups

Richard Tibbets has called me out for conflating Web 2.0 startups with all startups in my recent blog posting, “Google has a problem retaining great engineers? Bullcrap.”. His complaint was that I was over generalizing from Web 2.0 startups to all startups. He’s right, of course. The traditional “technology startup” by definition does have a large amount technology work that needs to be done, in addition to the business development work. However, things have changed a lot even for technology startups. Consider a company like Sequent Computer Systems, which started in 1983. At the time the founders had a key idea, which was to use multiple commodity intel CPU’s to create first SMP, and then later, NUMA minicomputers. But in order to do that, they had to design, build and manufacture a huge mount of hardware, as well as develop a whole new Unix-derived operating system, just to bring that core idea to market. These days, the founder or founders will have a core idea, which they will hopefully patent, to prevent competitors from replicating their work, just as before. However, these days there is a huge selection of open source software so there is much less technology that needs to be re-developed / re-invented in order to bring that idea to market. From Linux and BSD at the operating system level, to databases like MySQL, Apache web servers, etc., there is an awful lot for the startup to chose from. This is all goodness, of course. But it means that most of the technology developed in a typical startup will...

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Thank You For ...

The kids all got their black belts in TKD a couple of weeks ago, and what do I find in the mailbox today if it isn't their "thank you" notes that they apparently wrote as part of that whole experience...

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The People Who Support Linux: Late IT Bloomer Falls Hard for the OS


Matt Bridger says he is "a bit of a later developer, IT-wise." He received his first degree in History and during that time, he rarely came close to a computer. But the increasing relevance of computing around him could not be ignored, says Matt, both in the workplace and in everyday life. He soon found himself providing IT support to colleagues while working at the University of Cambridge, which is where he first encountered Linux. The OS was being used to manage academic archives and the faculty website.

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Our Annual Kernel Development Report: New (and Old) Faces

Today we are pleased to publish annual report on Linux kernel development, detailing who does the work, who sponsors it and how fast the Linux kernel is growing. The paper documents how hard at work the Linux community has been. There have been 1.5 million lines of code added to the kernel since the 2009 update.  Since that last paper, additions and changes translate  to an amazing 9,058 lines added, 4,495 lines removed, and 1,978 lines changed every day, ­ weekends and holidays included. The other good news is that in the list of sponsoring entities we see more mobile and embedded companies participating in Linux kernel development. We see companies...

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