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Outwitting the Fashion Police

This is a public service announcement for all geeks. Are you tired of people pointing out that you shouldn't use socks and sandals? I know, it really annoyed me too.
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Spam Begone

While I have a soft spot in my heart (or, rather, somewhere in my gastrointestinal tract) for Spam, the presence of spam, the opportunistic electronic kind, makes me crazed. taywknbuqe

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Looking at the Linux.com Roadmap

It's Friday, a day reserved for examining the week just passed and figuring out what got accomplished. It is also a day for eyeing the weekend ahead--I just stepped outside Linux.com HQ, and let me tell you, with weather this gorgeous, I am seriously distracted by the weekend to come.

Ahem, back to the topic at hand. What did we get done this week? The big technical change was the addition of the capability to run podcasts directly on Linux.com, as well as video. You saw this manifested in the hosting of the latest installment of the Open Voices series, an interview with IBM's Bob Sutor. I invite you to go have a listen, in case you haven't listened to it yet.

Some of you may have noticed the addition of the new Media Library section, too. Once we got the video functionality set up, we wanted to start out with the presentations from the 2009 Collaboration Summit, but we are open to more videos. We will be adding training and tutorial videos in the near future, and like all other parts of the site, if you have a video you'd like to share with Linux.com readers, I'd like to take a look. Use you Linux.com/Linux Foundation ID and post the video on our Video site, then drop me a line to request the video be on Linux.com. 

This isn't just for videos, by the way. If you have a podcast you'd like us to link to, tell us about that, too. 

Meanwhile, I'm looking at what's coming up on the features roadmap, and I'm pretty excited. We'll soon be making it easier to submit articles to all parts of Linux.com (and awarding of serious Guru points for doing so).We will also be working on building a more centralized directory of software, hardware, and distributions.

On that last feature set, I wanted to put to the community a query: what information do you think would be ideal in a central directory of software? We'll have links to documentation and download sites, plus screenshots and descriptions. But what else would be useful? Version information? Security advisories? Cross references with distros the app is included? What would make such a Directory the most useful for Linux users of all levels of expertise? Toss in your comments, and let me know soon.

Have a great weekend!

 

Happiness is a Warm SCM

I'll have to post this while I'm still happy, because the merge window for Linux 2.6.31 opened a day ago (well, somewhat more, but I don't take patches immediately after doing a release), and so far it's been such a nice thing that I thought I'd better post while in a good mood. Be...
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Blog Your Way to OSCON

One of the cooler aspects of the new Linux.com site is the ability for any registered user to come in and start their own blog at a coveted spot on the Internet. I have been enjoying many of the entries submitted thus far, and have even talked to a few writers about using their content as full-fledged articles on the site.

Naturally, this quality did come at the expense of some bumps along the way. Last week, the MyBlog system was flooded with spam content. While it was quickly removed as it appeared, it was enough of a problem that we are taking some steps to make sure such abuse does not continue.

Temporarily, we have made the blogs a moderated system. This was resisted on our part, because we wanted to keep the flow as open as possible. But, in order to stop the (mostly) overnight attacks, I decided to put the moderation gate in for now. Please note, I am only moderating for spam content--not opinions or subject matter. And again, this is temporary.

Ultimately, our development team will be putting a spam-removal system in where spam should not get through at all, and if it does, volunteer moderators will be able to remove it and block the offending spammer regardless of the time of day. This system will also be put in place for the direct messaging system and the forums, too.

Dealing with spammers is an unfortunate side-effect of working on the Internet today, and I hope you'll "pardon our dust" as we work to perfect Linux.com.

As a way of saying thanks, and to celebrate the community blogs, we'd like to kick off a little competition. Recently, we became media partners for the ever-cool OSCON event, happening July 20-24, 2009 in San Jose, CA. As a media partner, we were graciously donated two free passes to the event (excluding the tutorials) to share with two Linux.com users.

So, here's the scoop: starting at 12:01 a.m. EDT tonight (June 11) and for the rest of the month (11:59 p.m. EDT on June 30), the two community bloggers with the most total reads will each receive one of these passes to attend this year's OSCON.(Travel and accommodations not included, sorry to say.)

Note, this is total reads, not total blogs, because we're emphasizing quality, not quantity. You should have a few really great blog that capture a lot of reads each, versus a bazillion "Hello World" blogs. Be creative, be thoughtful. Get the conversations going. It might just get you in the door at OSCON.

 
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