April 20, 2009

Big-Volume Filesystems?

What filesystem would be best for large volumes?

On a production server ? For handling with big files (iso, virtual machines, ...

On a production server ? For handling with big files (iso, virtual machines, ...) ? My preferred choice is XFS.

Do you have Solaris ? are you dealing with big storage arrays ? ZFS is their choice (not mine, I wish to but I don't use Solaris)

BTRFS should be nice if you're planning some experiments, personally I don't suggest it to a production server machine

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I think rite now its ZFS on solaris but due to licensing issues i think it...

I think rite now its ZFS on solaris but due to licensing issues i think it cant be ported on linux.

The Btrfs(ButterFS or BTree Filesystem) project which is under active development rite now will be good for large volume.
http://btrfs.wiki.kernel.org/index.php/Main_Page

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I have one Solaris 10 system that runs ZFS and I mount my large filesystems...

I have one Solaris 10 system that runs ZFS and I mount my large filesystems on this system, then share to my Linux hosts.
As soon as I can mount and manage ZFS as a supported filesystem on Linux I will be replacing the Solaris 10 system.

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It seems the ZFS is the ultimate FS, but it still in the process to porting...

It seems the ZFS is the ultimate FS, but it still in the process to porting to linux.

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This depends on what you mean by "best". Best for delivering guaranteed rate...

This depends on what you mean by "best". Best for delivering guaranteed rate I/O for large files? XFS. Best for compatibility? ext4. Wikipedia has an excellent matrix of filesystem functionality in the entry for comparison of filesystems which will help you decide which of the available filesystems actually meet your requirements. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_file_systems)

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Thats not so easy, to answer that question a whole bunch of key-parameters...

Thats not so easy, to answer that question a whole bunch of key-parameters are necessary, such as

1. average filesize you want to save?
2. Used blocksize of your storage devices?
3. Whats important for you, speed or security, a mix of both?
4. I/O architecture, SAS, SCSI, iSCSI, Infiniband?
and a list of others

Such storage questions are a pain in the *** every time i hear them and are just possible to answer after a closer look on the whole infrastructure. On www.ibm.com/redbooks are also some nice hints to notice for decision makers

regards
T-One

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