December 17, 2014

How will linux interact with a hdd formatted by windows?

I'm considering installing linux onto one of my hdd's. I can leave it isolated but I have another drive with a load of files. Is there anyway for that drive to interest with the drive that has linux installed or any means to transfer files through some other process?

Most or all Linux distros have out-of-the-box support for HDD partitions...

Most or all Linux distros have out-of-the-box support for HDD partitions formatted by Windows (NTFS, FAT16, FAT32 and ExFAT) and after being mounted can read and write data to and from those partitions. Most or all distros also have the option to mount any of those partitions at startup. One thing that you ought to keep in mind is that NTFS is a PROPRIETARY format from Microsoft and Microsoft DOES NOT release the code being it and thus you should be very careful about writing and/or deleting large amounts of data to a NTFS partition from inside Linux. An approach you may consider (assuming you want to dual-boot your system with a Linux distro + a Windows OS), especially if you are going to handle most of your data from inside Linux and that you are planning to migrate definitely to a Linux distro and getting rid of your lousy Windows OS, is to copy all the data from that drive to another drive and repartition / reformat that partition to a proper Linux format such as ext3 or ext4, copy back the data to that drive and install a driver in your Windows system to read the contents of the ext3 or ext4 partitions. One caveat with that approach is that no good driver is available to WRITE data from inside Windows to a Linux ext3 / ext4 partition and it you install one such read+write driver you risk Windows completely messing up your Linux installation but installing a driver that can just read data from a Linux partition from inside Windows is foolproof and can do no harm to the Linux partitions and with a read-only driver you can always simply copy the data you want to handle, modify or process from the Linux partition to a NTFS partition. The "new" modified files can then later be simply copied from inside Linux.

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linux can interpret NTFS file systems as well as fat and fat32. You can keep...

linux can interpret NTFS file systems as well as fat and fat32. You can keep your files on their original HD and install Linux on the second one. linux will show you every file system detected and display then in your systems file manager. Look for a HD icon when you open your file manager.

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