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NOOB's adventures in Linux From Scratch

 All I've got to say is if you're from the Windows world, there's no curveballs here. I breezed thru the X windows explanations all except the configuration files area without a hitch.

  Next up .... Getting things done in Linux    

 

Ha.

Well this is neat.
 

Linux.com开张

  我是一个很闲的人,到处都会留下我的脚印。
 

Abandoning your blog for Twitter?

It seems to be a trend that's gathering steam. Even though its something that I would never do, I do see it happening around the web. I have gone to check on friends blogs to see what they have been blogging about and find that there aren't any new entries. After a little more investigation I find that they have joined Twitter and have been posting like crazy.

Part of me is cool with it and just goes ahead and follows them so that I can keep informed. The other part of me is sad that I can no longer visit their small part of the world to enjoy more than just 140 characters. I have decided to integrate twitter into my blog with the very wonderful Twittertools plugin. I would encourage any bloggers out there who are finding themselves spending more and more time on twitter, not to abandon their real home because a good blog is eternal and if the past is any indication of the future then who know where Twitter will be two years from now.

 

GNU/Linux with Family and Friends

So I've been using GNU/Linux for a few years and have (mostly) learned my way around things that come up quite often. I've seen a few reoccurring problems again and again such as "Which Flash plugin should I download?" and "How do I turn off that beep when I shutdown?" I've even walked my girlfriends 14 year old sister through a dpkg-reconfigure of xorg over the phone because the ATI drivers she had were broken.  She was an excellent listener and it was a success.

I've learned a lot about different sorts of hardware on laptops (most students at the University have laptops), which drivers work the best, which flash plugin to use and how to remove others, etc.

I've spoken to family and friends about GNU/Linux and why its my OS of choice.  I explain how open source works, why its different, and why I use it.  I've had quite a few friends want to know more, see it in action, a few have dual-booted, and some even drop Windows altogether.

So far, the reaction has been great.  There's a few small problems that friends run in to.  For instance, my girlfriend, Brittany's iPod touch still isn't natively supported with Rhythmbox and syncing with her music library.  I know there's a way to jailbreak it and sync over wireless over SSH, but I'd like to keep the 'hackiness' down with her hardware in the event something were to go awry.  This past Tuesday required a BIOS upgrade on a HP Pavilion dv9700 for a friend because it apparently wasn't giving the correct voltage to the wireless radio switch (rendering his wireless dysfunctional), also the lights on the volume button ceased to function.  After the upgrade, Ubuntu 9.04 Jaunty Jackalope installed the restricted drivers from Broadcom and it worked like a charm along with the lights on his volume buttons.

Some of the great points that get people interested is the lack of viruses.  The University requires all Windows computers to have Cisco Clean Access Agent installed to verify they have the latest Windows Updates along with Symantec Antivirus and latest updates.  This sofware has been quite problem-ridden for a lot of residents and the Resnet Office's solution is a clean install of Windows (hope you had your stuff backed up).  *Nix computers accessing the network do not require the software, we only have to provide credentials through our browser.  I've seen RAM usage on startup go from 1.33gbs to 128mb on startup between Vista and Ubuntu. They also like the speed compared to their current XP or Vista installs.  One particular girl exclaimed, "I used to turn on my computer, dry my hair, and when I came back it would be started up completely.  Now I can't even make it to my hair dryer!"

Along with friends, my mom and sister have been able to use and find open source alternatives to the software they had been used to running and have been able to keep compatability with their workplaces.  The Gimp is an excellent alternative to Photoshop (let alone the free MS Paint that ships with Windows), OpenOffice.org has them compatable with the latest Microsoft .*x documents, (and even saving to PDF without a $449 install of Adobe Pro), Rhythmbox, Exaile, Banshee for managing their mp3 players, Brasero for audio/data CD/DVD's, etc.

I will be sure to talk to anyone that asks me about GNU/Linux and share my experiences, thoughts, and oppinions.  It doesn't take one person to make differences, it has taken the entire community to do what it has done so far, and I would like to be a part of this community and give back more than I have taken.

 

How to Setup World of Warcraft on Linux

I wanted to share with everyone a guide that I wrote for a friend a few weeks ago.  Hopefully it may be of some use to people.

 


Here is a quick guide to getting The World of Warcraft working in wine (By the way I am giving you this guide using primarily the command line ... sorry there are easier ways to do it from a GUI, but I am not familiar with them myself ... so I am giving you instructions that I know work because this is the way I do it)

Install lastest version of Wine:

Go to this link: http://www.winehq.org/site/download-deb and follow the instructions to install the latest version of wine. (Make sure to read the whole page there are two things you need to do, also it is all in a GUI so its pretty easy)

Setup Wine for World of Warcraft:

Next open a command terminal and type "winecfg" to start wine configuration screen. 
Change the version of windows on the main screen to "win2000" Click on the "Audio" tab at the top of the window to change wines sound settings.  An error message will pop up ... just click okay (It's wine saying that you haven't set up an audio device yet) Next make sure that ONLY "alsa" is checked marked and click the "okay" button to close the setup window.

There are two methods to proceed from this point.  The easy way is to copy an exsisting install of World of Warcraft from a windows partition, or install thru wine.

1st Method:

Here is the easy way (If you have maintained your WoW updates it is also the quickest when it comes time to update WoW) First navigate to your windows drive "Program Files" folder and copy and paste the "World of Warcraft" folder into the following directory: "/home/$USER/.wine/drive_c/Program Files" (Replace $USER with your user name)\

2nd Method:

Pop in the first install disk wait for an icon of it to appear on your desktop. Open a command terminal and type "cd /media/cdrom (ENTER)" to navigate to the CD. You can type "ls" to list the contents of the directory.  As long as you went to the right cd-drive (Assuming you have more than one) you should see the files on the cd listed. Next type "wine Setup.exe" to start WoW's installer. Go thru the normal install options and let it do it's thing. When it comes time to put in the next CD you need to do a special trick to get wine to release the drive. While keeping the first terminal open (DO NOT CLOSE IT OR YOU HAVE TO START OVER!!) open a second terminal. In the new terminal type "wine eject d:" to open the cd drive. Replace the disk with the next install disk. Before you click on okay in the WoW installer window make sure to Double click on the disk icon (Either on your desktop, or in the "Computer" option under the places menu) to load the replacement disk into the system. Once that is done you can continue on with the installation. Repeat the eject procedure for the remaining three disks. After the installer has completed, World of Warcraft has now been installed into the "/home/$USER/.wine/drive_c/Program Files/World of Warcraft" folder. ($USER being your user name)

Making It Easy to Run World of Warcraft:

Now all you have to do is create a launcher script to make starting WoW easier.  Execute the following command to create a new text file called "wow" in the "/usr/bin" folder and open it in a text editor:

sudo gedit /usr/bin/wow

Once the text editor is open type the following command (or copy and paste) into it:

env WINEPREFIX="/home/$USER/.wine" WINEDEBUG=-all wine "C:\Program Files\World of Warcraft\Wow.exe" -opengl

(Don't worry about changing anything in the above command, when I wrote this I used wildcards to automatically tell the system were stuff is. Alternatively you can replace $USER with your user name and it will still work just fine. I wrote it this way so you can just copy paste it into the file) (Also this script assumes that you only have one user account on the system who intends to play WoW.  If you have more than one user setup on the system that also wants to play WoW you need to change some options which I will explain at the end of this guide)

Now click the save button and close the text editor.  All you have to do now to get World of Warcraft to be easy to start is make the new launcher script you just created executable.
Type the following command (This command just tells the system that this script can be executed):

sudo chmod +x /usr/bin/wow

Your done!  You can now start WoW by either typing "wow" into a terminal, or opening the "Run Dialog" by pressing Alt-F2 and typing "wow"or making a menu icon thru the menu editor and just clicking on it in the menu.

Special Setup Instructions For Systems That Have More than 1 User Account Which Will Run World of Warcraft:

The only change you will make to the above instructions is to setup permissions on your ".wine" folder and modify the start up script. To do this open your "Home" folder in the file manager.
Click the "View" tab at the top of the windows and check mark the box next to "Show Hidden Files" Scroll down until you see the ".wine" folder and right click on it.  Select "Properties" to open the folders properties menu. Click on the "Permissions" tab and change the "Access" for all sections to read:

Folder Access ===>> Create and Delete Files
File Access ===>> Read and Write

Now click on the "close" button to exit the editor.

Lastly you need to make an adjustment to the launcer script from above to point explicitly to the location where World of Warcraft is installed.

Edit the file with the same command from above:

sudo gedit /usr/bin/wow

Change:

env WINEPREFIX="/home/$USER/.wine" WINEDEBUG=-all wine "C:\Program Files\World of Warcraft\Wow.exe" -opengl

To:

env WINEPREFIX="/home/(YOUR USER NAME)/.wine" WINEDEBUG=-all wine "C:\Program Files\World of Warcraft\Wow.exe" -opengl

Save the file and you are done.

Okay easy enuf.... lol sorry man I still tend to do most things from the command line, even though I know that there are easier ways to do it from a GUI. I would bet that you can find guides for a GUI method somewere by searching google.  I have just found over the years it is faster to just hammer it out the old fashioned way.

 

If anyone has any comments or suggestions feel free to let me know.

 

Cheers,

Xipher

 

n00b

Goodness gracious, how many blogs can one girl have?! haha. Honestly I'm not sure I could truly count all the blogs I've created over the years. I am presently maintaining a "personal diary" on a diary website, and have just created another two blogs; one to document my adventures living abroad for my family to see how things are going, and another as a more personal blog, where I intend to share more personal stuff and my views on things.

 But hey, what's one more, right?! I mean after all, this is Linux.com! ;D

I have nothing useful to say right now though, but I just made this account so I thought I should go ahead and post something.

And wow, sharing a blogosphere (yeah I have no idea what to call it, haha) with Linus Torvalds,  talk about exciting! Ok, I sound like a total dope, I know. But Linux is friggin badass amazing, and that's in large part due to him! So I will be fangirl over sharing a blogging world with him. ;D

 Peace out
Mel

 

The Insufferable State of Linux Documentation

I've been waiting for a response from anyone from The Linux Documentation Project (tldp.org). Ghost town projects are normally not such a bad thing - often the page goes down and that's the end of it. Some projects are worth abandoning, as they become obsolete and are replaced by better things.

However, The Linux Documentation Project has been an institution in the Linux Community since 1992. Many of its guides and howtos are still relevant - Linux.com using them is proof enough of that.

The project is in bad need of an overhaul, though. There's little stylistic consistency between pages, the IRC channel (#tldp on freenode) is empty, the mailing lists are no longer a hotbed of activity. The simple steps of getting on the mailing list is made difficult by using an obsolete list program (Mailman could make signing up a snap). You cannot even get anonymous CVS access outside of their ancient CVS viewer.

Half of getting TLDP back on its feet won't even be working with the guides or howto's - it will be addressing the antiquated infrasture of the project itself.

 

Zhu8 On Linux

  就是想来测试一下,貌似新的Linux.com功能很齐全啊!看到kDolphin已经来留了一爪子了。

„ÄÄ„ÄÄPSÔºöË≤剺ºBloggerÂèàÊålj∫ÜÔºåÂîâ……ÂêåÊó∂ÊàëÁúãÂà∞Linux.comÔºåËÆ©ÊàëÊÉ≥Âà∞‰∫ÜOperaÁöÑBlogÊ∞∏‰πÖË¢´GFWԺ剺∞ËÆ°ËøôÈáå……‰∏ç˶ÅËØ¥Êàë‰πåÈ∏¶Âò¥Âïä……

 

A way to find a text string inside all files

# find / -type f -exec grep -l "word" {} \;
 

Learn How to Choose the CMS that’s right for you

Choosing an Open Source CMS is a new book from Packt that guides readers through understanding the different types of CMSs and selecting the one that best fits their needs. Written by Nirav Mehta, this book will help users assess their technical skill level and choose a CMS that combines ease of use with flexibility and power.

Open Source CMSs are the best way to create and manage sophisticated websites. Users can create a website that precisely meets their business goals, and keep the website up-to-date easily because these systems give them full control over every aspect of their website. Open Source CMSs are free to download, and have a vast choice between the various systems.

This book will show users how to avoid choosing the wrong CMS. It will guide users through assessing their website requirements, and based on this assessment, will help identify the CMS that will best fit their needs. It then talks about the major CMSs and the issues that users should consider when choosing, such as their complexity to use, their features, and the power they offer. Users will also be introduced to technical considerations such as programming languages, and compliance with best practice standards in a clear and friendly way.

Additionally, the book highlights many quick-start guides and examples for the most popular CMSs such as WordPress, Joomla! and Drupal. This allows users to experiment with these CMSs, get a feel of how they work, and start using them to build their website. The book also teaches users how to install and customize a CMS with themes and plug-ins. In addition to this, it covers practical tips on hosting, project management, working with specialists and communities, and finding experts.

Developers interested in creating a website by using a good CMS will find this book useful. This book is out now and is available from Packt. For more information, please visit: http://www.packtpub.com/choosing-an-open-source-cms-beginners-guide/book

 
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