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Mandriva 2009.1 (Spring) 64 Bit

Link to this post 19 May 09

Hi Folks,

First off I am a Mandriva fanatic I have "had a go" with others. In fact I started off with SuSE until they sold their shirts to Microsoft.

So anyway I here to entice you in to the world of Mandriva. I have the latest & greatest 2009.1 installed (64 bit) version running on the new ext4 file system - which works great no issues. I install both Gnome & KDE which allows me to swap around as my fancy takes.

I am a Mandriva Club member which gives me access to the Power Pack edition. No too much different from the One edition. It mainly allows me to contribute towards maintaining my fav distro.

So I fully recommend that you give it a try - not a brown wallpaper in sight...:laugh:

Jim

Link to this post 09 Jul 09

I definitely agree with Jim. When you finally get tired of the crap Ubuntu throws at you, give Mandriva a try! The true user-friendly distro ;)

Link to this post 26 Sep 09

I wish i could share your enthusiasm.:dry: Let me start by saying I want use Mandriva as my main distro, I read it the one to use if you want to do developer work and I do. But every time I get it going some recommended update hoses X, kills my user account and leaves my system with a keyboard that only works in the CLI. Also all attempts to run the updates to fix it fail:angry: I use the system for school so every time it fails I fall behind. Guys let me in on the secret to keep it running


TNX

da kid

Link to this post 29 Sep 09

kidcharlamain wrote:

I wish i could share your enthusiasm.:dry: Let me start by saying I want use Mandriva as my main distro, I read it the one to use if you want to do developer work and I do. But every time I get it going some recommended update hoses X, kills my user account and leaves my system with a keyboard that only works in the CLI. Also all attempts to run the updates to fix it fail:angry: I use the system for school so every time it fails I fall behind. Guys let me in on the secret to keep it running


TNX

da kid

That's happened if you've either installed ati or nvidia drivers manually instead of using urpmi to do it or if there is an xorg issue with your graphics card which should be followed up either at freedesktop.org, ati.com or nvidia.com; depending on which driver you use.
I've never experienced anything like that even when testing cooker.
First place to look for problems with xorg is in /var/log/xorg.0.log.old after x has restarted.

Link to this post 01 Oct 09

Ok the NVIDIA issue makes sense, my laptop has an NVIDIA card. But I just had another crash after updates were installed on a new 2009.1(Spring) installation. The problem this time is a grub error 17, looking a bit further the boot drive seems to be missing.:blink: I tried to to restore an image I made of my system with clonezilla and it said that it couldn't re-install grub, so I went the 2009.1(Spring) rescue system and tried to re-install grub and got the same error boot drive is missing. So next I went to check the partitions and got an error that partition table was severely corrupted, so I re-created the partitions and tonite I will try to restore my clonzilla image. These are the types of problems I have had with Mandriva. At first I thought it was defective hardware but Fedora, Red Hat, SuSE and CentOS all run fine, and none of the hardware diagnostics I ran found any problems, and this is why I had decided to stop using Mandriva.:dry:

Any suggestions would be much appreciated

TNX

Link to this post 02 Oct 09

You have a hard disk with bad sectors. It happens if you don't partition your disk right and use things (Commonly) Like ntfs (Easily corrupts your disc,) resize partitions incorrectly (It is a dark art,) You constantly format, delete and re-create partitions on the same disk in empty spaces on the disk or use different programs to create partitions.
When sectors on a disk go bad the disk can fail. You then have two options :
Buy a new hard drive and backup using a live cd onto the new disk you bought (Create the layout on the new disk once with one program, format the partitions and then stick with the layout forever more)
Or you can use :
http://www.dposoft.net/#b_hddhid
to repair the bad sectors on the disk. It costs money but it is worth it.

I'm really sorry but pointing the finger at Mandriva Linux for a problem you have with some faulty hardware you bought isn't going to fly; now is it?

Ftw : When you install Mandriva to your hdd it makes a backup of the mbr in it's boot directory.

Also, it still amazes me that :
A : People still try to install operating systems to computers without backing up their mbr first.
B: That Linux distributions don't provide an easy to use interface for mbr backup and restore on their installation media.

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