Anonymous
May 15, 2009

Do we ever question Linux?

An almost randomly‚Äêchosen, wise quote:

It takes a lot of courage to release the familiar and seemingly secure, to embrace the new. But there is no real security in what is no longer meaningful. There is more security in the adventurous and exciting, for in movement there is life, and in change there is power.

And now that I’ve scared away more than half of the viewers…

I wish that the Linux community–the developers and the end users–would spend more time asking simple questions, get some interesting discussions going—and to challenge what is considered to be the hard facts in Linux‐land.

Instead of getting to “the right answer” or a conclution right now, let’s rather discuss the pros and cons about for instance having one software package format. Should the Linux Standard Base/The Linux Foundation standardize one?

This might seem scary, but remember that you’re already used to having one choice of certain components in Linux. There’s only one kernel and–as far as I know, only one X system (I don’t really consider rare forks, obsolete, outdated versions and such, as alternatives).

Another question, is the command line mode needed in 2009? Can the powerful grep, pipe, less‐stuff be replaced by a snappy file manager with some filtered views? And why can’t Linux have a nice and smooth startup screen like Windows and OS X?

Why are there folders named usr, dev and etc in the file system? usr sounds like user, but it means Unix System Resources. dev could for a newcomer be mistaken for developer, etc sounds more like et cetera than settings etc. Aren’t Users, Settings and Applications more descriptive?

So these are the kind of questions that I wish there would be more discussions about.

Discuss!